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Lines that delight, lines that blight

This WSJ graphic caught my eye. The accompanying article is here. The article (judging from the sub-header) makes two separate points, one about the total amount of money raised in IPOs in a year, and the change in market value of those newly-public companies one year from the IPO date. The first metric is shown...

Counting large crowds

So the inauguration was on Friday, and there’s been some disagreement about how many people showed up to the event. It turns out, as one might expect, counting thousands of people moving in and out of a space without some kind of counting mechanism like turnstiles is tricky. The New York Times provides a bit...

Catalog of visualization tools

There are a lot of visualization-related tools out there. Here’s a simple categorized collection of what’s available, with a focus on the free and open source stuff. This site features a curated selection of data visualization tools meant to bridge the gap between programmers/statisticians and the general public by only highlighting free/freemium, responsive and relatively...

Embedding.js: Data-driven environments for virtual reality

Embedding.js is a work-in-progress JavaScript library by Beau Cronin that makes it more straightforward to create data-driven environments. Think virtual reality and rotating areas in the browser. From Cronin: [I]t’s not just about 3D — we’ve used various depth cues in windowed visualization settings for some time, and in some cases these techniques have been put to...

Lines that delight, lines that blight

This WSJ graphic caught my eye. The accompanying article is here. The article (judging from the sub-header) makes two separate points, one about the total amount of money raised in IPOs in a year, and the change in market value of those newly-public companies one year from the IPO date. The first metric is shown by the size of the bubbles while the second metric is displayed as distances from...

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Counting large crowds

So the inauguration was on Friday, and there’s been some disagreement about how many people showed up to the event. It turns out, as one might expect, counting thousands of people moving in and out of a space without some kind of counting mechanism like turnstiles is tricky. The New York Times provides a bit of background. Tags: counting, estimation

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Catalog of visualization tools

There are a lot of visualization-related tools out there. Here’s a simple categorized collection of what’s available, with a focus on the free and open source stuff. This site features a curated selection of data visualization tools meant to bridge the gap between programmers/statisticians and the general public by only highlighting free/freemium, responsive and relatively simple-to-learn technologies for displaying both basic and complex, multivariate datasets. It leans heavily toward open-source...

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Embedding.js: Data-driven environments for virtual reality

Embedding.js is a work-in-progress JavaScript library by Beau Cronin that makes it more straightforward to create data-driven environments. Think virtual reality and rotating areas in the browser. From Cronin: [I]t’s not just about 3D — we’ve used various depth cues in windowed visualization settings for some time, and in some cases these techniques have been put to good use. But something altogether different happens when we inhabit an environment, and in particular...

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Mixing cartography and landscape drawing

Artist Matthew Rangel hikes cross-country and through the mountains, exploring and drawing along the way. He then mixes his drawings with maps and photos from history for unique results and perspective. My location drawings of large expanses throughout my journey serve to reinforce our land-based visual codes by the activity of transcribing the land through yet another system of careful measurements. This practice deepens my personal connection with the land,...

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Draw the patterns of Obama’s presidency

A couple of years back The New York Times asked readers to draw on a blank plot the relationship between income and college attendance. It was a way to get you to think about your own preconceptions and compare them against reality. The Times recently applied the same mechanic to the changes during Barack Obama’s presidency. Bonus: Here’s how to make your own you-draw-it graph. Tags: drawing, game, New York...

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Interview with Sesame Street’s Count von Count

Focusing on immigrant characters in television shows, The Guardian US’s data editor Mona Cholabi interviewed Sesame Street’s Count von Count. It only lasts a few minutes but will put a smile on your face. Tags: Count von Count, Guardian, Sesame Street

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History of data visualization

I have an affinity for new things designed as old things, so this brief history of data visualization by RJ Andrews hits the spot. I have placed cartoons representing important works of data visualization along a fictitious scroll map in the style of Ogilby’s atlas. The road marches you through time, passing many charts, through towns (named for key contributors whose charts make up said towns), and over waterways that...

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Balloon maps

There was a time when the best way to get a view from above was to hop into a hot air balloon, which eventually led to the so-called “balloon map.” Cara Giaimo for Atlas Obscura starts the story with a ballooner named Thomas Baldwin. In an age of transatlantic flights and Google Earth, Baldwin’s suggestions seem a bit quaint. But in his time, when almost everyone was stuck on the...

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National Geographic Infographics, the book

Infographics devolved a bit in recent years, but there was a time the term wasn’t immediately associated with content marketing. (And there is still plenty of good infographic work that actually informs.) National Geographic is one such source of inspiration, and now you can get a best-of collection in book form that spans over a century. With an essay by Nigel Holmes, charting the evolution of National Geographic over the...

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