Tracking Historical Twitter Followers: @elisewho vs. @stiles

My wife (@elisewho) and I (@stiles) had a silly social media moment yesterday when I replied to one of her tweets — despite the fact that she was sitting in an adjacent room of our Seoul apartment. USC professor Robert Hernandez (a.k.a. @webjournalist) captured it:   Among my favorite media couples are @elisewho and @stiles. pic.twitter.com/HLp3g90Tgc — Robert is in S. Korea (@webjournalist) February 12, 2018 The exchange, which we both...

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Who’s Competing at Pyeongchang? A Breakdown By Sports, Nations, Genders

More than 2,900 athletes from 92 nations and territories are competing in the Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea. The event has 15 different sports (and many events within each). Which sports have the most athletes? Hockey, which requires a 23-person roster, leads the list, followed by largely individual sports, such as alpine and cross-country skiing: Here’s how those sports break down by the number of competing countries. Again, alpine...

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Which Countries Sent the Most Athletes to Pyeongchang?

Because I live in Seoul and work as a journalist, I’m paying close attention to the Winter Olympics as they open tonight in Pyeongchang, South Korea. I don’t know much about the Winter Games’ history, so I decided first to research which countries are here. Europe dominates: Here’s a world map (Russia has many athletes here, but they’re not eligible for medals because of a doping scheme): And a table,...

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Visualizing the Historical Relationship Between White, Black Unemployment Rates

President Trump was right last month when he bragged that black unemployment rate was at a historical low. The rate in December was 6.8 percent, the lowest it’s been since 1972 (though it ticked back up nearly a percentage point last month). But the president’s statement excluded some important context about the historic movement of this rate by race and ethnicity. I’ve tried to explain in these graphics. First, here...

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Visualizing Income Equality in Major World Economies

Years after a global crisis, the world’s largest economies are again growing, The New York Times reported over the weekend. Every major economy on earth is expanding at once, a synchronous wave of growth that is creating jobs, lifting fortunes and tempering fears of popular discontent. A tweet on the subject prompted a friend to respond with a question about whether income inequality has grown — and that in turn prompted...

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The Curious Case of South Korea’s Vanishing Washing Machine Exports

The Trump administration last week announced that it planned to impose higher fees, known as tariffs, to countries that export washing machines and solar panels the United States. The tariffs, prompted by complaints from American companies who feel disadvantaged by global trade, were applied across the world — even though they seem primarily aimed at two nations who dominate the market: China and South Korea. That’s in part because both countries...

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The Curious Case of South Korea’s Vanishing Washing Machine Exports

The Trump administration last week announced that it planned to impose higher fees, known as tariffs, to countries that export washing machines and solar panels the United States. The tariffs, prompted by complaints from American companies who feel disadvantaged by global trade, were applied across the world — even though they seem primarily aimed at two nations who dominate the market: China and South Korea. That’s in part because both countries...

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Mapping the United States’ Korean Population

I’ve often felt fortunate that I get to write about South Korea for the Los Angeles Times, a newspaper that’s still interested in stories related to life, politics and culture here — not just the strongman to the North. That interest is in part because the Times remains a serious paper that’s trying to stay committed to foreign news, but also because a decent portion of its readers are Korean. The...

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“My 52 Books of 2017: A Data-Driven Look Back”

Viz-ing my wife’s crazy book-reading habits… Source: Hey Elise Via: Elise Hu It suppose it was fortuitous that the year I decided to read 52 books was also a year the news was an epic dumpster fire. I needed the escape from reading news alerts. But reading MORE than I already do was tricky, when a huge chunk of my job is simply reading, writing, and then… Read more at:...

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How Do We Solve North Korea? Yonsei University Students Have Ideas.

I gave a guest lecture today to an East Asian international relations course at Yonsei University in Seoul. As part of the class, the more than 40 students participated in an exercise by answering this question about North Korea: How do we address the North Korea nuclear issue? 1. Accept as nuclear state 2. Strike known nuclear targets 3. International sanctions 4. Suspend U.S. military drills 5. Diplomacy 6. Two...

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