Trolling the uncertainty dial

During the election last year, The New York Times ran an uncertainty dial to show where the vote was swaying. Not everyone appreciated it. Many people hate it. The Outline disliked it enough to troll with an uncertainty dial of their own. Personally, I like the dial, but I think it does require a certain level of statistical knowledge to not lose your marbles watching it. Tags: uncertainty

0 0
Alone Time

It’s harder to make friends as you get older. There aren’t as many (forced) opportunities to find them and we grow pickier with who we spend our time with. So… Read More

0 0
Parts of America that most resemble the future

The Census Bureau released estimates for demographic breakdowns for each county — in 2060. With these estimates as the baseline, Niraj Chokshi and Quoctrung Bui for The Upshot compared it against current population estimates. The result is a map of counties most resembling the past, present, and future. Clark County, which occupies that corner of Nevada, is the county that most looks like the United States of 2060 in terms...

0 0
When babies are born, the cycle

Movies would have you believe that birth is random and unpredictable. (And if you haven’t been part of the birth process, you’d be surprised by how slow it actually is.) While uncertainty is always in play, there’s a certain cycle to it all. Zan Armstrong and Nadieh Bremer for Scientific American, using 2014 data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, examined the regularity and the reasons for the...

0 0
Email Deletion Flowchart

We all get a lot of emails, and there’s a large subset of them that almost instantly end up in the archive or the trash bin. In the past year, this subset seems to have really grown for me. They tend to follow a similar pattern to “submit infographic” probably 90 percent of the time. At this point, the patterns seem so regular that I can archive without ever opening...

0 0
A thousand ways to draw a thing

Google released the Quick, Draw! dataset, so the closer looks at the collection of 100,000 sketches are coming in. This fun piece by Yannick Assogba uses principal components to arrange doodles in some organized way. Reminiscent of Aaron Koblin’s classic The Sheep Market. Tags: Doodle, Google

0 0
A guide for using open data to combat corruption

Open Up: A Guide to Using Open Data to Combat Corruption is free for download. A broad understanding of corruption recognises that it is not just about isolated acts between two different agents: the one who offers a bribe, and the one who receives it. Instead, corruption is a complex crime. It is driven by networks of officials, professional intermediaries and companies. So in order to tackle corruption effectively, you...

0 0
Data Everywhere, Statisticians Anywhere

I had the honor to deliver the commencement speech at the UCLA Statistics graduation this past weekend. I’m going to put this here for posterity before my memory tucks it away never to be uttered again. I truncated the speech last minute, so these notes are little more coherent than my delivery. A big congratulations to all of you! It took a lot of work, a lot of distributions, sampling,...

0 0
Circle drawing as an indicator for culture

Thu-Huong Ha and Nikhil Sonnad for Quartz looked at the doodling dataset from Google, in search of cultural differences hidden in how we draw circles around the world. We used the public database from Quick, Draw! to compare how people draw basic shapes around the world. Our analysis suggests that the way you draw a simple circle is linked to geography and cultural upbringing, deep-rooted in hundreds of years of...

0 0
Normal coffee

Nerd humor: Asked for a normal coffee ☕ pic.twitter.com/JoakebV9xN — Matt Moores (@MooresMt) June 14, 2017 That barista deserves a tip. Tags: humor

0 0