Bloomberg

8 posts
Who marries who, by profession

People with certain professions tend to marry others with a given profession. Adam Pearce and Dorothy Gambrell for Bloomberg Business were curious. When it comes to falling in love, it’s not just fate that brings people together—sometimes it’s their jobs. We scanned data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2014 American Community Survey—which covers 3.5 million households—to find out how people are pairing up. You get a matrix of professions organized...

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Finding meaning in Big Blue California

Via Twitter, Pat complained that this Bloomberg graphic is confusing: The accompanying article is here. The gist of the report is that electric cars are much more popular on the West coast because the fuel efficiency of such cars goes down dramatically in colder climates. (Well, there are political reasons too, also discussed in the article.) What makes this chart confusing? Our eyes are drawn to big blue California, and...

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ASCII business report

Bloomberg put together their list of 50 companies to watch in 2016. For each business is a chart or graphic, and the whole thing is in ASCII text. And in case you're wondering, yes, you can view it as a plain text file. All I need now is my old dot matrix printer. Tags: Ascii, Bloomberg

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Stock trading game

Bloomberg Business has an interesting stock trading game with a simple premise. A time series line starts at the beginning of a stock's life and runs its course all the while you buy and sell trying to profit. Click and hold the mouse button to buy, and release to sell. The key is to click when the stock price is low and to release when it's high. Of course, this...

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Searching for stock market spoofers

Stock market spoofers put in orders to buy with the intent to cancel. This can shift prices up with fake interest, or it can shift prices down with a wave of cancellations. The spoofers then take advantage of the shifts by buying and selling accordingly. Bloomberg has an interesting stepper that walks you through the process for how one might catch such spoofers. It starts with an overview. A minute...

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Quick change of mind on social issues

As Supreme Court hearings for same-sex marriage start today, Alex Tribou and Keith Collins for Bloomberg look back at timelines for past social issues, such as interracial marriage and abortion. Each line represents an issue, and the height shows the number of states that removed the ban each year, so you end up with lines that increase slowly, and then there's a sudden jolt upwards that ends in federal action....

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Feeling hot, hot, hot

When you look at overall global temperatures over time, you see a rising line and new heat records set. Instead of just one line though, Tom Randall and Blacki Migliozzi for Bloomberg split up the time series by year and animated it. Each year is overlaid on top of the other with a new time series in each frame. The dotted line rises too as new records are set, and...

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Basic chart, wrong conclusions

A short post on Bloomberg from 2013 describes the fall of U.S. mens' income for the past forty years. To illustrate, the author uses the chart above, and we're like, "Oh gee willikers, that sure is a big drop in income. I guess mens' income is well on its way to zero dollars. Gosh darn it to heck." But maybe we're riled up for nothing. Eric Portelance takes a small...

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