Data Art

1 posts
Tracking ballet dancer movements

Research group Euphrates experimented with lines and a ballet dancer’s movements in Ballet Rotoscope: By the way, rotoscoping is an old technique used by animators to capture movement. Pictures or video are taken and lines are traced for use in different contexts. [via @Rainmaker1973] Tags: ballet, rotoscope

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How generative music works

Generative music comes from the design of a system that produces notes that follow a set of rules. Tero Parviainen provides a detailed, interactive explainer for how this works in practice using ample examples. Take your time with this one. Tags: music

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Looking for patterns and structures from the sky

Photographer Bernhard Lang takes pictures in small planes and helicopters, pointing his camera towards the ground. In the ongoing project Aerial Views, he focuses on patterns and structures, which makes for interesting visuals that you’d miss on the ground. Tags: photography, physical

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Visualization song release

Ukranian band Obiymy Doschu released a new song Razom. “It’s a uplifting and tender song about being afraid of your own hapiness and holding your feelings inside, and that sometimes just a little step in the direction of a loved one will help you find yourself again.” Sounds good to me. The lead singer is also an engineer at Mapbox, and he made a visualization to accompany a song. Each...

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Visualizing fertilization of egg by sperm at the atomic level, with a Star Wars theme

Don Ingber and Charles Reilly of the Wyss Institute used data at the atomic level to visualize the simulation of sperm fertilizing an egg. The researchers used a Star Wars theme. To see if entertainment could offer a solution to this challenge, Ingber teamed up with Charles Reilly, Ph.D., a molecular biophysicist, professional animator, and Staff Scientist at the Wyss Institute who previously worked at movie director Peter Jackson’s Park...

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Art piece uses wind energy to mine cryptocurrency and then fund climate research

HARVEST is an art piece by Julian Oliver that consists of a 4G-connected waterproof computer connected to a wind turbine. While it is powered by the wind, the computer mines for for cryptocurrency, and earnings are then cashed out as donations to climate change research organizations. Yeah. Tags: climate, crytocurrency

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Everyday thresholds visualized in dramatic fashion

This is a fun one that’s weirdly suspenseful. Everyday thresholds, like the slow flip of a light switch towards the on position and stacking blocks until they fall over, are displayed on one side. On the other side, a line chart shows progress towards a threshold. Tags: humor, threshold

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Photorealistic balls of precious metals placed outside their mines

Artist Dillon Marsh uses CGI balls of metal placed outside of mines to show how much was extracted from each location. The project is called For What It’s Worth. These images combine photography and computer generated elements in an effort to visualise the output of a mine. The CGI objects represent a scale model of the materials removed from each mine, a solid mass occupying a scene showing the ground...

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Karate-inspired projection mapping

I have no idea how projection mapping works, so it kind of feels like magic to me. I like it. This work projects onto a martial artist, making him bigger than life. Tags: projection mapping

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Infinite Twitter ad campaign, based on data profiles

As you probably know, Twitter (and all social media) collects data about you and infers your likes, dislikes, wants, dreams, hopes, etc. Sam Lavigne set up a scraper to find out all the user segments, ranging from “buyers of cheese” to “households with people who have recently moved into a new home.” It can get pretty detailed. Lavigne then used this data to automatically generate an infinite ad campaign, on...

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