Data Art

57 posts
A thousand ways to draw a thing

Google released the Quick, Draw! dataset, so the closer looks at the collection of 100,000 sketches are coming in. This fun piece by Yannick Assogba uses principal components to arrange doodles in some organized way. Reminiscent of Aaron Koblin’s classic The Sheep Market. Tags: Doodle, Google

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Looking for culture expression in 50 million doodles

Using Google’s Quick Draw dataset, a collection of 50 million drawings across 345 categories, Mauro Martino looked for visual differences and similarities across countries in how people doodle. The result is his project Forma Fluens. As you can see above, drawings of an eye, the sun, and a face came out roughly the same. But then there are country-specific things like a power outlet: Good stuff. [Thanks, Mauro] Tags: culture,...

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Pollution popsicles

Students at the National Taiwan University of Arts made popsicles using sewage runoff to highlight pollution problems in their area. Then they replicated the popsicles and made stylish wrappers for a longer-lasting display. Mmm, sewage. [via Mashable] Tags: pollution, popsicles

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Solar System in a bottle

From Little Planet Factory, a Solar System in a bottle made to scale: A small bottle attempting to maintain the correct scale between the 8 planets of the solar system at a scale of 1:5,000,000,000. Much as in reality the entire bottle is almost entirely dominated by the volume (and mass) of the four gas giants while the four solid planets settle almost dust like in comparison at the bottom...

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A story of humanity in the pixels of a Reddit April Fool’s experiment

On April Fool’s Day, Reddit launched a blank canvas that users could add a colored pixel every few minutes. It ran for 72 hours, and the evolution of the space as a whole was awesome. What if you look more closely at the individual images, edits, and battles for territory? Even more interesting. sudoscript looks closer, breaking participants into three groups — the creators, protectors, and destroyers — who fight...

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Time-lapse of community-edited pixels

For April Fool’s Day, Reddit ran a subreddit, r/place, that let users edit pixels in a 1,000 by 1,000 blank space for 72 hours. Users could only edit one pixel every ten minutes, which forced patience and community effort. This is the time-lapse of the effort. Kind of great. It’s fun to watch the edits of thousands converge. It’s a complete hodgepodge but it all fit together in the relatively...

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Evolution of The New York Times front page

From Josh Begley, this quickfire flip book shows every New York Times front page since 1852. Watch the shift from all words, to a handful of small pictures, to larger pictures, to color, and then more color pictures. It reminds me of the flip book for the Hawaiian Star and the comparison of pages for popular science magazines, which show a similar evolution. Tags: animation, New York Times, news

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Forest of Numbers

To celebrate the ten-year anniversary of the National Art Center in Tokyo, Emmanuelle Moureaux made the Forest of Numbers. The installation “Forest of Numbers” visualized the decade of the future from 2017 to 2026, created a sense of stillness across the large exhibition space. More than 60,000 pieces of suspended numeral figures from 0 to 9 were regularly aligned in three dimensional grids. A section was removed, created a path...

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Sharing the same traits and qualities

My son used to watch Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood (a modern take on Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood) a lot, and one song’s chorus goes like, “In some ways we are different, but in so many ways we are the same.” This commercial from TV2 in Denmark is the grown-up, categorical version of that message. Tags: commercial, human

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Emotional arcs for inaugural addresses

Inaugural addresses come in different flavors, with different messages and purpose. Periscopic passed video of the ten most recent speeches through the Microsoft Emotion API to estimate emotion from each speaker’s facial expressions. Then they used a feather metaphor to visualize the results. Shown here in the form of collected emotion arcs, each “feather” represents an inaugural address. Each barb of the feather is a moment during the speech where...

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