Data Art

3 posts
Art piece uses wind energy to mine cryptocurrency and then fund climate research

HARVEST is an art piece by Julian Oliver that consists of a 4G-connected waterproof computer connected to a wind turbine. While it is powered by the wind, the computer mines for for cryptocurrency, and earnings are then cashed out as donations to climate change research organizations. Yeah. Tags: climate, crytocurrency

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Everyday thresholds visualized in dramatic fashion

This is a fun one that’s weirdly suspenseful. Everyday thresholds, like the slow flip of a light switch towards the on position and stacking blocks until they fall over, are displayed on one side. On the other side, a line chart shows progress towards a threshold. Tags: humor, threshold

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Photorealistic balls of precious metals placed outside their mines

Artist Dillon Marsh uses CGI balls of metal placed outside of mines to show how much was extracted from each location. The project is called For What It’s Worth. These images combine photography and computer generated elements in an effort to visualise the output of a mine. The CGI objects represent a scale model of the materials removed from each mine, a solid mass occupying a scene showing the ground...

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Karate-inspired projection mapping

I have no idea how projection mapping works, so it kind of feels like magic to me. I like it. This work projects onto a martial artist, making him bigger than life. Tags: projection mapping

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Infinite Twitter ad campaign, based on data profiles

As you probably know, Twitter (and all social media) collects data about you and infers your likes, dislikes, wants, dreams, hopes, etc. Sam Lavigne set up a scraper to find out all the user segments, ranging from “buyers of cheese” to “households with people who have recently moved into a new home.” It can get pretty detailed. Lavigne then used this data to automatically generate an infinite ad campaign, on...

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Empty bladder, full bladder

I always enjoy the data sketches that Mona Chalabi posts on Instagram. She takes typically everyday data and sketches them or uses props to communicate the actual meaning. Check them out if you aren’t familiar. In her most recent sketch, Chalabi used fruit to compare an empty bladder and stomach to a full bladder and stomach. Source:┬áNanomedicine Volume I, 1999 #datasketch A post shared by Mona Chalabi (@mona_chalabi) on Jun...

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A thousand ways to draw a thing

Google released the Quick, Draw! dataset, so the closer looks at the collection of 100,000 sketches are coming in. This fun piece by Yannick Assogba uses principal components to arrange doodles in some organized way. Reminiscent of Aaron Koblin’s classic The Sheep Market. Tags: Doodle, Google

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Looking for culture expression in 50 million doodles

Using Google’s Quick Draw dataset, a collection of 50 million drawings across 345 categories, Mauro Martino looked for visual differences and similarities across countries in how people doodle. The result is his project Forma Fluens. As you can see above, drawings of an eye, the sun, and a face came out roughly the same. But then there are country-specific things like a power outlet: Good stuff. [Thanks, Mauro] Tags: culture,...

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Pollution popsicles

Students at the National Taiwan University of Arts made popsicles using sewage runoff to highlight pollution problems in their area. Then they replicated the popsicles and made stylish wrappers for a longer-lasting display. Mmm, sewage. [via Mashable] Tags: pollution, popsicles

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Solar System in a bottle

From Little Planet Factory, a Solar System in a bottle made to scale: A small bottle attempting to maintain the correct scale between the 8 planets of the solar system at a scale of 1:5,000,000,000. Much as in reality the entire bottle is almost entirely dominated by the volume (and mass) of the four gas giants while the four solid planets settle almost dust like in comparison at the bottom...

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