Education

18 posts
Announcing a new venture

This is a great time for people in the data business. If you go on Linkedin and look for data jobs, there are several thousand open positions, just in the New York area. Every department within any business is accumulating data, and they need people to help them get value out of the data. There are also lots of people I meet who would like to transition their careers to...

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Sorting out what’s meaningful and what’s not

A few weeks ago, the New York Times Upshot team published a set of charts exploring the relationship between school quality, home prices and commute times in different regions of the country. The following is the chart for the New York/New Jersey region. (The article and complete data visualization is here.) This chart is primarily a scatter plot of home prices against school quality, which is represented by average test...

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Looking for more affordable homes and better schools in the suburbs

Families often move out of the city to the suburbs for more affordable housing (or more space) and better schools for the kids. Quoctrung Bui and Conor Dougherty for The Upshot plot these two things, average price per square foot and school district performance, to compare against the respective city. In addition, there are two more encoded variables in each bubble. Size represents population, and color represents an average commute...

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Visualizing citation impact

Michael Bales and his associates at Cornell are working on a new visual tool for citations data. This is an area that is ripe for some innovation. There is a lot of data available but it seems difficult to gain insights from them. The prototypical question is how authoritative is a particular researcher or research group, judging from his or her or their publications. A proxy for "quality" is the...

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Race to the top, Erasmus edition

(This is a submission from reader Lawrence Mayes. Thank you Lawrence!) I came across this unusual graphical representation of the destinations of scholarship students: [Kaiser here: The charts are hidden inside an annoying Flash app and it seems that the bottom half of the chart is cropped out.] (the original can be seen here: http://www.ibercampus.eu/-270-000-students-benefitted-from-eu-grants-to-study-or-2076.htm) The question is: what parameter is used to illustrate the figures? - Line length or...

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Fields of Study Ranked Over Past Few Decades

Based on bachelor's degrees conferred, here are the fields that were and are currently popular. Read More

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Sorting out the data, and creating the head-shake manual

Yesterday's post attracted a few good comments. Several readers don't like the data used in the NAEP score chart. The authors labeled the metric "gain in NAEP scale scores" which I interpreted to be "gain scores," a popular way of evaluating educational outcomes. A gain score is the change in test score between (typically consecutive) years. I also interpreted the label "2000-2009" as the average of eight gain scores, in...

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Involuntary head-shaking is probably not an intended consequence of data visualization

This chart is in the Sept/Oct edition of Harvard Magazine: Pretty standard fare. It even is Tufte-sque in the sparing use of axes, labels, and other non-data-ink. Does it bug you how much work you need to do to understand this chart? Here is the junkchart version: In the accompanying article, the journalist declared that student progress on NAEP tests came to a virtual standstill, and this version highlights the...

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Diversity percentages for US schools

Based on 2014 estimates from the U.S. Department of Education, the Chronicle of Higher Education compiled a straightforward searchable and sortable table that shows the race percentages for more than 4,600 institutions. FYI: The search function is basic, and you have to enter a school’s name to match as it is entered in the system. For example, a search for “Berkeley” only shows the schools that start with that but...

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Out of state, public education

Nick Strayer for the New York Times shows the flow of college freshman to other states for public education: Students have long traveled across state lines to go to selective private colleges. But at public colleges, which have historically served local residents, the number of out-of-state freshmen has nearly doubled since 1986, according to data from the Department of Education. See the full piece for in- and out-of-state numbers for...

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