environment

29 posts
Moving ice

Ice in Antartica is in constant (very slow) motion, and as ocean waters warm, the flow of ice accelerates. The New York Times mapped the flows, showing where the ice is headed. And, if you’re interested in how they did this, NYT graphics editor Derek Watkins provides the rundown. Tags: environment, glaciers, New York Times

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Melting glaciers

Glaciers at Glacier National Park in Montana are melting. Using data from the United States Geological Survey and Portland State University, Nadja Popovich for The New York Times maps the shrinking glaciers with their 2015 footprint overlaid on their footprints from 50 years ago. Tags: environment, glaciers, New York Times

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Breathing Earth of vegetation

Using data from NOAA STAR, Nadieh Bremer creates a breathing Earth that shows the seasonal cycles of vegetation over the course of a year. The animation happening in the map above, through all 52 weeks of 2016, visualizes these seasonal cycles. The rise and fall of the growing season in the Northern Hemisphere is particularly visible. However, when focusing on different parts of the planet other cycles & different seasons...

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X-Ray of the oceans

Using satellite data and spatial models, researchers estimate human influence in the ocean. Darker means more impact. Two-thirds of the ocean shows increased strain from human-related factors, such as fishing and climate change. And more than three-quarters of coastal waters suffer from climate change and increases in the effects of harmful land-based activities, including pollution. In all, the researchers classified more than 40 percent of the ocean as “heavily impacted”...

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Climate Change Coloring Book

The Climate Change Coloring Book by Brian Foo makes data tactile and interactive. “The goal is to encourage learning, exploration, and reflection on issues related to climate change through act of coloring.” It’s in the early days of a Kickstarter campaign, but I suspect it’ll be funded in no time. Pledged. Tags: book, climate, environment

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Following the carbon dioxide

This animated visualization from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center shows a model of carbon dioxide swirl around the planet, “using observations from NASA’s Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO-2) satellite.” Tags: carbon, environment, NASA

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Houston flooding on the rise

Climate change is doing some weird stuff. What were once rare weather events could grow more common. ProPublica and The Texas Tribune zoom in on Houston, where there’s likely to be much more flooding than usual and not enough residents prepared for the rise. scientists say climate change is causing torrential rainfall to happen more often, meaning storms that used to be considered “once-in-a-lifetime” events are happening with greater frequency....

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Finding the wet princes of Bel Air

In case you didn’t know, there’s a drought here in California so there are rules for when you can and can’t water your grass and plants. Not everyone adheres to those rules though. And some households really don’t follow the rules. In Los Angeles, or more specifically, Bel Air, there are a handful of households using millions of gallons per year. Michael Corey and Lance Williams for Reveal used satellite...

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Mississippi drainage

Horace Mitchell for NASA’s Scientific Visualization Studio mapped the massive drainage basin that is the Mississippi Watershed. The Mississippi Watershed is the largest drainage basin in North America at 3.2 million square kilometers in area. The USGS has created a database of this area which indicates the direction of waterflow at each point. By assembling these directions into streamflows, it is possible to trace the path of water from every...

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Oceans absorbing heat

It keeps getting hotter on this planet, and the oceans are absorbing most of the heat. Tim Wallace for the New York Times shows several decades of changes. Tags: environment, New York Times, temperature, Tim Wallace

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