facebook

4 posts
Facebook still allowed race exclusion for housing advertisers

Last year, ProPublica revealed that Facebook allowed housing advertisers to exclude races in their campaigns. Facebook said they would address the issue. ProPublica returned to the topic. Facebook didn’t do a very good job. All of these groups are protected under the federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to publish any advertisement “with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or...

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Prophet for forecasting with a lot of data

Facebook released Prophet, which is a procedure to quickly forecast with time series data. Prophet is a procedure for forecasting time series data. It is based on an additive model where non-linear trends are fit with yearly and weekly seasonality, plus holidays. It works best with daily periodicity data with at least one year of historical data. Prophet is robust to missing data, shifts in the trend, and large outliers....

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Data Selfie: Chrome extension logs what Facebook learns about you

Facebook logs data about you and how you use their application. I know this. You know this. From there, Facebook makes inferences and serves you ads that might be relevant. Data Selfie is a Chrome extension that attempts to log similar data about you so that you can see what Facebook sees. The data stays local on your computer, and you can export it or delete it. You also get...

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U.S. culture through TV show geography

Map who “likes” television shows on Facebook, by ZIP code, and you get a good idea of cultural boundaries. This is what Josh Katz for the Upshot did for 50 of the most liked shows in the United States, finding three distinct regions: “cities and their suburbs; rural areas; and what we’re calling the extended Black Belt.” Tags: facebook, television, Upshot

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Breaking the algorithmic black box

The general public kind of knows about data privacy issues. But not really. Or they know, and they’re willing to trade for the ability to share things easily on social media. I liken it to people who eat hot dogs but avoid animal parts that aren’t in the shape of a steak. As long as it’s packaged right and you can’t see the bits, it must be okay. It’s similar...

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Sans human, Facebook’s Trending Topics algorithm faired poorly

Last week, Facebook announced that it was making the Trending Topics section more automated. More algorithm-based. Less person-based. On Monday, the section showed a fake news story at the top of the list for several hours. Nick Statt for the Verge on the human element: The changes instituted on Friday didn’t throw all of that away; Facebook has been slowly stripping away the human element of Trending Topics for months...

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Demographics of laughter on the web

There are a handful of ways to express laughter online, and it appears there are subtle differences in demographics, based on what you use. After reading an anecdotal story in the New Yorker by Sarah Larson, Facebook Research looked at the data. Ms. Larson discusses the emergence of the peculiar hehe, which is "poised upon us by the youth." Are the hehes really a more youthful expression than hahas? The...

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Trust engineers

The most recent episode of RadioLab is on social experimentation and social networks. More specifically, Facebook and their timeline tinkering. Because Facebook, or something like it, is more and more the way we share and like, and gossip and gripe. And because it's so big, Facebook has a created a laboratory of human behavior the likes of which we've never seen. We peek into the work of Arturo Bejar and...

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