human

9 posts
Mass exodus at human scale

Big numbers are too abstract in our minds to fully understand the scale of things. So, to show the full gravity of the hundreds of thousands of Muslims fleeing Myanmar’s Rakhine state, Reuters starts with the individuals and builds your intuition towards the true scale. Tags: human, scale

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Complement data with emotion for full effect

Data is a great vehicle for arguments, but the (not just visual) perception can change completely depending how a reader feels. Cognitive neuroscientist Tali Sharot talks facts and emotions on Hidden Brain. The example at the end is interesting. Tell a person a joke when they’re sad, and they probably won’t think the joke is funny. Make the person happy first, and it’s more likely they’ll see the joke from...

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Sharing the same traits and qualities

My son used to watch Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood (a modern take on Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood) a lot, and one song’s chorus goes like, “In some ways we are different, but in so many ways we are the same.” This commercial from TV2 in Denmark is the grown-up, categorical version of that message. Tags: commercial, human

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Skittle disconnect

This is what happens when there is a disconnect between data and what it represents. So much wrong. This image says it all. Let's end the politically correct agenda that doesn't put America first. #trump2016 pic.twitter.com/9fHwog7ssN — Donald Trump Jr. (@DonaldJTrumpJr) September 19, 2016 I need to avoid social media for the next month. There is something upsetting every single time these days. Tags: human, Skittles

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Twitter bot generates biographies via Census data

We usually see Census data in aggregate. It comes in choropleth maps or as statistics about various subpopulations and geographies. Is there value in seeing the numbers as individuals? What about the people behind the numbers? FiveThirtyEight intern Jia Zhang experiments on Twitter. [I] built a Twitter bot that mines for details in the data. Called censusAmericans, it tweets short biographies of Americans based on data they provided to the...

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Discrimination algorithms

Claire Cain Miller for the Upshot on when algorithms discriminate: There is a widespread belief that software and algorithms that rely on data are objective. But software is not free of human influence. Algorithms are written and maintained by people, and machine learning algorithms adjust what they do based on people’s behavior. As a result, say researchers in computer science, ethics and law, algorithms can reinforce human prejudices. I bring...

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Data into art and connecting to humans

Visualization tends to rest in the realm of efficiency and accuracy. From a research perspective, these are easier things to measure than say, emotion and connection to the data that a visualization represents. In decision-making and well, just overall opinion about the world we live in, social aspects of data play a significant role. The Creators Project interviewed data artists who work on this fuzzier side of insight. Tags: Creators...

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The dots are people

The simple analysis is to approach data blind, as machine output. But this almost always produces an incomplete analysis and a detached, less than meaningful visualization. Jacob Harris, a developer at the New York Times, talks context, empathy, and what the dots represent. In reference to the New York Times' map of deaths in Baghdad after receiving the Wikileaks war logs: Before it was a final graphic though, it was...

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Chart none of the things

When it comes to storytelling, copious amounts of data often means lots of charts. Sometimes though, a chart isn't what you need. Sarah Slobin, a graphics editor for the Wall Street Journal, talks about such an experience. The urge was to chart all the things, but in the end, there was a better route. Losing the graphics made sense to all of us on the project. What worked best for...

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