infographics

1 posts
When babies are born, the cycle

Movies would have you believe that birth is random and unpredictable. (And if you haven’t been part of the birth process, you’d be surprised by how slow it actually is.) While uncertainty is always in play, there’s a certain cycle to it all. Zan Armstrong and Nadieh Bremer for Scientific American, using 2014 data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, examined the regularity and the reasons for the...

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Baseball hitting angles on the rise

After the crackdown on performance-enhancing drugs, home runs in professional baseball dipped the past few years. They seem to be back up though, and new metrics on hitting angle might have something to do with it. Dave Sheinin and Armand Emamdjomeh for The Washington Post delve into the angles, along with hit speed, and how they lead to more home runs. Tags: baseball, Washington Post

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Gerrymandering game shows you hot it works

Gerrymandering is the practice of manipulating boundaries in such a way that favors a political party. If you slice and group in various ways, you can end up with different election results. How many different ways can you draw boundaries though? And can results really change that much, depending on you draw the boundaries? District, by Christopher Walker, is a puzzle game that shows you how it works. The goal:...

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Sandwich alignment chart

By @matttomic, this chart speaks to me. Tags: humor, sandwich

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Life expectancy if all diseases were magically cured

Here’s a fun what-if simulation that imagines a world where all natural causes of death were gone. People only die of things like car crashes and homicide. The result: people who live to thousands of years old. Of course, this assumes that the likelihood of dying from external causes stays the same. With such a long life expectancy, do people start to take more risks? Or do we become more...

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Senators and Reps whose voting doesn’t quite match the constituent’s

I know, it’s only April 2017, but some senators and representatives have some extra planning to as they figure out how to persuade midterm voters to re-elect them when the voters went a different direction for the presidential election. Kevin Schaul and Kevin Uhrmacher for The Washington Post use a scatterplot and scrollytelling to explain. Tags: voting, Washington Post

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Finding the craft beer capital of America

You had me at craft beer. Russell Goldenberg for The Pudding looks for the capital based on three factors — number of breweries, quality of breweries, and location — under the premise that the whole process of picking the best is really subjective. Don’t miss the second the chart, which is a scatterplot that shifts favorite cities based on your preferences. Tags: beer

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Context, color and animation: a nice effort

What made this infographic from South Carolina Ports is the choice of contextual comparisons. The simple animation also helps. (Original here if the animated gif isn't working.) The random colors mean nothing but they did make me look at the graphic in the first place.

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Climate Change Coloring Book

The Climate Change Coloring Book by Brian Foo makes data tactile and interactive. “The goal is to encourage learning, exploration, and reflection on issues related to climate change through act of coloring.” It’s in the early days of a Kickstarter campaign, but I suspect it’ll be funded in no time. Pledged. Tags: book, climate, environment

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Best infographics in the news

The annual Malofiej Awards is the big one for infographics in the news. The 25th one just passed, and you can browse all the winners here. There’s a lot of great work that you should associate with infographics — and not the spammy stuff that fills my inbox. Tags: Malofiej

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