infographics

165 posts
Mikaela Shiffrin pulling away for gold

Mikaela Shiffrin won her first gold medal in PyeongChang with a fraction of a second lead. In events where athletes race side-by-side, it’s easier to see how close such a lead is. But with alpine skiing, it feels more like a race against a clock. So to capture some of the dramatics of the former, Derek Watkins and Denise Lu for The New York Times imagined the results had all...

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Visual introduction to the Fourier Transform

One of my least favorite electrical engineering courses in college was on signals and communications. I remember there being a lot of Fourier Transforms. I also remember falling asleep a lot, because it was a two-hour lecture with the lights turned off. Maybe if the demos were more visual like this, I would’ve stayed awake. (Probably not.) Tags: Fourier Transform

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Where constituent input ends up

When you have input to send Congress, you have a number of communication options available to you: phone, email, social media, etc. Many of the bigger issues have dedicated sites that help automate some of the process, which of course leads to a large volume of input that lands in a congressperson’s voicemail, inbox, and notifications tab. Where does it all go? The OpenGov Foundation looked into it and produced...

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Olympian mechanics

Well this is awesome. The New York Times highlighted four olympians with a mix of video and graphics: figure skater Nathan Chen, alpine ski racer Mikaela Shiffrin, snowboarder Chloe Kim, and snowboarder Anna Gasser. These are fun to watch, and it’s so fascinating to hear from the individuals who strive to be the best. Also, I am glad that graphics editors (and us) can take a break from other matters...

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Olympians in your living room through augmented reality

Well this is awesome. The Winter Olympics start this Friday, and The New York Times published this piece using augmented reality. Point your phone’s camera somewhere flat in your room, and you see four olympians in a still action shot. Walk around them, walk up to them, and see the details. My four-year-old got a kick out of it. For the last Winter Olympics, The Times aimed to make the...

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Scissors congruence

The Wallace–Bolyai–Gerwien theorem says that if you have two polygons of equal area, you can cut one into pieces, and then place them back together to form the second piece. Dima Smirnov and Zivvy Epstein made an interactive to demonstrate. Draw two shapes and watch the magic happen. Tags: geometry, theorem

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Hand-drawn how-to instructions using zero words

Inspired by Dear Data, the data drawing pen pal project, designers Josefina Bravo, Sol Kawage, and Tomoko Furukawa use the postcard medium to send each other weekly how-to instructions for a wide variety of everyday things. The only rule is that they can’t use words. As of writing this, they’re on week 37, which covered how to roll maki, how to eat an apple like a boss, and how to...

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Is there something wrong with democracy?

Max Fisher and Amanda Taub, for The New York Times, answer the question with a video and charts. And if you’re wondering how they generated a high resolution chart to video, Adam Pearce has you covered. Tags: democracy, New York Times

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Porn traffic before and after the missile alert in Hawaii

PornHub compared minute-to-minute traffic on their site before and after the missile alert to an average Saturday (okay for work). Right after the alert there was a dip as people rushed for shelter, but not long after the false alarm notice, traffic appears to spike. Some interpret this as people rushed to porn after learning that a missile was not headed towards their home. Maybe that’s part of the reason,...

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Compare your fears against reality

From ABC News, this is a clever comparison between people’s worst fears and the number of deaths caused by the things that people fear. It starts by getting the reader to think about his or her fears and then places them in the context of causes of death. Tags: fear

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