Network Visualization

1 posts
Mappings for Choose Your Own Adventure books

Every now and then there’s a visual exploration of the Choose Your Own Adventure series. It seems that each gets a bit more complex, so I appreciate the simplicity of these official maps from Chooseco, which shows the structure of each book. Atlas Obscura provides the details. On the official maps, however, the endings aren’t coded in any way that reveals their nature. Instead, they operate according to a simple...

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How disinformation spreads in a network

Disinformation is kind of a problem these days, yeah? Fatih Erikli uses a simulation that works like a disaster spread model applied to social networks to give an idea of how disinformation spreads. I tried to visualize how a disinformation becomes a post-truth by the people who subscribed in a network. We can think this network as a social media such as Facebook or Twitter. The nodes (points) in the...

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Apple vs. Google company structure, as seen through patents

For Co.Design, Periscopic compared patent ownership between Apple and Google, which ends up providing a good idea of company structure. “Over the past 10 years Apple has produced 10,975 patents with a team of 5,232 inventors, and Google has produced 12,386 with a team of 8,888,” writes Wes Bernegger, data explorer at Periscopic. Those numbers are, frankly, pretty similar in terms of proportion. “The most notable difference we see is...

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How much the US imports from Mexico

Most goods imported from Mexico are untaxed under the North American Free Trade Agreement. The Administration wants to tax those billions of dollars of goods coming in. David Yanofsky for Quartz plotted the imported products. Quartz gathered import data from the US Census Bureau comprising 6,011 hierarchical product categories, the amount imported, and the tax collected. Every product the US buys at least $1 million worth from Mexico is shown...

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How different languages represent van Gogh

Christian Laesser takes an abstract look at how different languages represent Vincent van Gogh through various Wikipedia pages.  The visualization explores how different languages present Van Gogh’s work and life by images. Inspired by Geolinguistic Contrasts in Wikipedia. The viz tries to show different narative strategies by showing the image type, origin date and authorship. You can reveal the connections between languages by hovering the images. I’m not quite convinced...

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Star Trek character network

Star Trek fans rejoice. Mollie Pettit from Datascope Analytics visualized the interactions between all the characters in all the movies, series, and episodes. This visualization shows interactions between characters in the Star Trek Universe based on the episodes or movies you have selected. Each circle represents a character, and links represent interactions between characters. The more interactions between two characters, the thicker the link between them; similarly, the more interactions...

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Charted history of music, from its origins to present

Musicmap is an attempt to show the history of music over time and how it came to be what it is today. Musicmap attempts to provide the ultimate genealogy of popular music genres, including their relations and history. It is the result of more than seven years of research with over 200 listed sources and cross examination of many other visual genealogies. Its aim is to focus on the delicate...

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Play chess against the machine and see what it’s thinking

The Thinking Machine, by Martin Wattenberg and Marek Walczak, shows you the thought process of a computer trying to win at chess. There have been several iterations that date back to 2002, but the most recent iteration was built for modern browsers and you can play against the computer. Tags: chess, Martin Wattenberg

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Game of Thrones discussions for every episode, visualized

I hear there’s some show called “Game of Thrones” that’s kind of popular these days. Twitter visualized how every episode was discussed, counting the character connections, the emojis used, and the changes over time. See how popular each character was, and the emojis used to described each character. In the visualization below, each circle represents a character with its size proportional to how often the character was mentioned in the...

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Air transportation network

Flight pattern maps are fun to look at and reveal the complexity of air transportation on a daily basis. But, there are other angles to look at this data from. Martin Grandjean used a force-directed graph to focus less on geography and more on volume and connections. Color represents continent, circles represent airports, and circle size represents number of routes. Major observations: India is more connected to the Middle East...

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