New York Times

29 posts
Moving ice

Ice in Antartica is in constant (very slow) motion, and as ocean waters warm, the flow of ice accelerates. The New York Times mapped the flows, showing where the ice is headed. And, if you’re interested in how they did this, NYT graphics editor Derek Watkins provides the rundown. Tags: environment, glaciers, New York Times

0 0
LeBron James passed Michael Jordan in playoff points

As a Golden State Warriors fan, I am obligated to dislike LeBron James, but there is no denying that he is a great basketball player. James recently passed Michael Jordan for playoff points with number 5,995, and he’s got plenty left in the tank it seems. Adam Pearce for The New York Times shows the point trajectory with a return of the scrolling visualization. Tags: basketball, New York Times, sports

0 0
Melting glaciers

Glaciers at Glacier National Park in Montana are melting. Using data from the United States Geological Survey and Portland State University, Nadja Popovich for The New York Times maps the shrinking glaciers with their 2015 footprint overlaid on their footprints from 50 years ago. Tags: environment, glaciers, New York Times

0 0
Visual simulations to show Uber game strategies

Uber uses psychology and video game mechanics to encourage drivers to work longer and drive in certain areas. Noam Scheiber for The New York Times details the gray area that Uber resides in since drivers aren’t official employees. Uber exists in a kind of legal and ethical purgatory, however. Because its drivers are independent contractors, they lack most of the protections associated with employment. By mastering their workers’ mental circuitry,...

0 0
Conflicted public opinion about global warming

Based on estimates from the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication, The New York Times mapped the percentage of people who think global warming will harm the country against the percentage of people who think it will harm them personally. It’s a big contrast. Almost opposites, which is a big source of why action is so slow-moving. Check out the Yale interactive too to see more contrasting opinions. Tags: global...

0 0
Evolution of The New York Times front page

From Josh Begley, this quickfire flip book shows every New York Times front page since 1852. Watch the shift from all words, to a handful of small pictures, to larger pictures, to color, and then more color pictures. It reminds me of the flip book for the Hawaiian Star and the comparison of pages for popular science magazines, which show a similar evolution. Tags: animation, New York Times, news

0 0
Draw the patterns of Obama’s presidency

A couple of years back The New York Times asked readers to draw on a blank plot the relationship between income and college attendance. It was a way to get you to think about your own preconceptions and compare them against reality. The Times recently applied the same mechanic to the changes during Barack Obama’s presidency. Bonus: Here’s how to make your own you-draw-it graph. Tags: drawing, game, New York...

0 0
Football catches visualized

It’s always fun to go back to sports articles and graphics that were a lead-up to a game the day after. The newest addition: this graphic from The New York Times that shows wide receiver Odell Beckham Jr.’s catches this season. It shows route patterns, the catch, yards after the catch, and touchdown paths. If you’re not into football, just take it in as a small multiples example. Tags: football,...

0 0
Map of New York City shadows

Shadows cast by buildings affect the feel and flow of a city, and lack of sunlight can change aspects of daily living, such as rent. In a place like New York City, where there are tall buildings aplenty, the effects are obvious. Quoctrung Bui and Jeremy White for The New York Times mapped the darkness. The results are based on research from the Tandon School of Engineering at New York...

0 0
Actual deportation numbers

There was a lot of talk about deporting millions of illegal immigrants immediately, but as The New York Times shows, the actual number that could be deported is much less. Haeyoun Park and Troy Griggs use a clustered, force-directed graph to show the pool of 11 million immigrants and then filter down as you scroll. The transitions are key. Tags: deportation, New York Times

0 0