Olympics

1 posts
Who’s winning the medal race, depending on how you weight the medals

Every year, we look at the medal counts of each country. Who’s winning? It depends on how much value you place on each medal. Do you only count the golds and disregard silver and bronze? Do you just treat all medals the same? Josh Katz for The Upshot lets you test all the possibilities with this interactive. Apply different values to each medal type by mousing over the x-y coordinate...

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Mikaela Shiffrin pulling away for gold

Mikaela Shiffrin won her first gold medal in PyeongChang with a fraction of a second lead. In events where athletes race side-by-side, it’s easier to see how close such a lead is. But with alpine skiing, it feels more like a race against a clock. So to capture some of the dramatics of the former, Derek Watkins and Denise Lu for The New York Times imagined the results had all...

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Olympian mechanics

Well this is awesome. The New York Times highlighted four olympians with a mix of video and graphics: figure skater Nathan Chen, alpine ski racer Mikaela Shiffrin, snowboarder Chloe Kim, and snowboarder Anna Gasser. These are fun to watch, and it’s so fascinating to hear from the individuals who strive to be the best. Also, I am glad that graphics editors (and us) can take a break from other matters...

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Which Countries Sent the Most Athletes to Pyeongchang?

Because I live in Seoul and work as a journalist, I’m paying close attention to the Winter Olympics as they open tonight in Pyeongchang, South Korea. I don’t know much about the Winter Games’ history, so I decided first to research which countries are here. Europe dominates: Here’s a world map (Russia has many athletes here, but they’re not eligible for medals because of a doping scheme): And a table,...

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Olympians in your living room through augmented reality

Well this is awesome. The Winter Olympics start this Friday, and The New York Times published this piece using augmented reality. Point your phone’s camera somewhere flat in your room, and you see four olympians in a still action shot. Walk around them, walk up to them, and see the details. My four-year-old got a kick out of it. For the last Winter Olympics, The Times aimed to make the...

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Composite Olympic moments

One more Olympics-related piece for the road. The New York Times used photo compositing to show a handful of critical moments for individual athletes. The above is the Laurie Hernandez’ dismount during the team event. And, I can’t go without mentioning the Nike human chain commercial from six years years ago, which is the video version of this. Tags: compositing, New York Times, Olympics

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Heptathlon rankings with parallel coordinates

The Guardian covered the rankings for the women’s heptathlon, specifically how Nafissatou Thiam from Belgium pulled off a surprise gold. The main chart is a variant of a parallel coordinates plot. However, the chart type, which is usually read left to right, is rotated for vertical reading, and instead of straight connecting lines, a path of right angles is used instead. Nice. [Thanks, Matthew] Tags: Guardian, Olympics, parallel coordinates

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Every fastest man on one track

The New York Times has been pulling from the vault for this year’s Olympics, adapting previous graphics to current results. If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. With Usain Bolt making the 100-meter look entirely too easy, NYT compares his time to times from winners of Olympics past — all on the same track. If you like that, be sure to check out the original video versions from 2012. Tags:...

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Why all the swimming ties in the Olympics

As the Olympics are all about reaching peak physical potential, it shouldn’t surprise that a lot of races are close, but there’s been a good number of ties this year. The measurement system allows for precision up to the millionth of a second. So what gives? Timothy Burke for Deadspin provides the explanation. In a 50 meter Olympic pool, at the current men’s world record 50m pace, a thousandth-of-a-second constitutes...

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Michael Phelps race times since his first Olympics

That Michael Phelps. He is a crazy man, in the best possible way. Derek Watkins and Larry Buchanan for the New York Times compare race times of young Michael Phelps against those of current Michael Phelps. The piece as a whole serves as a quick visual history of the legendary swimmer’s career, that we still get to watch more of (if I can figure out NBC’s broadcasting schedule, that is)....

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