Politics

8 posts
Let’s not mix these polarized voters as the medians run away from one another

Long-time follower Daniel L. sent in a gem, by the Washington Post. This is a multi-part story about the polarization of American voters, nicely laid out, with superior analyses and some interesting graphics. Click here to see the entire article. Today's post focuses on the first graphic. This one: The key messages are written out on the 2017 charts: namely, 95% of Republicans are more conservative than the median Democrat,...

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Let’s not mix these polarized voters as the medians run away from one another

Long-time follower Daniel L. sent in a gem, by the Washington Post. This is a multi-part story about the polarization of American voters, nicely laid out, with superior analyses and some interesting graphics. Click here to see the entire article. Today's post focuses on the first graphic. This one: The key messages are written out on the 2017 charts: namely, 95% of Republicans are more conservative than the median Democrat,...

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Starstruck and doubled over: losing poise over Indian charts

Twitter follower @ashwink_s didn't see eye-to-eye with the following charts that appeared in an Indian publication. There is the infamous racetrack chart: In the racetrack chart, the designer has embedded data in the angles at the center of the concentric circles but the visual cues point to the arc lengths. If the same proportion of people voted Yes as voted No, the two arcs should look like this: The length...

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Visualizing electoral college politics: exercise in displaying relationships between variables

Reader Berry B. sent in a tip quite some months ago that I just pulled out of my inbox. He really liked the Washington Post's visualization of the electoral college in the Presidential election. (link) One of the strengths of this project is the analysis that went on behind the visualization. The authors point out that there are three variables at play: the population of each state, the votes casted...

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Wheel of fortune without prizes: the negative report about negativity

My friend, Louis V., handed me a report from Harvard's Shorenstein Center, with the promise that I can make a blog post or two from it. And I wasn't disappointed. This report (link) caught some attention a few months ago because of the click-bait headline that the media is "biased" against Trump in his first 100 days. They used the most naive definition of "bias". The metric is the amount...

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Politics of religious leaders

Kevin Quealy for The Upshot looks at political party registration of religious leaders, along with their demographics. Some groups like Reform Judaism and Fundamental Baptist are predictable, whereas others (most) are mixed. Tags: politics, religion

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What do we think of the “packed” bar chart?

Xan Gregg - my partner in the #onelesspie campaign to replace terrible Wikipedia pie charts one at a time - has come up with a new chart form that he calls "packed bars". It's a combination of bar charts and the treemap. Here is an example of a packed barchart, in which the top 10 companies on the S&P500 index are displayed: What he's doing is to add context to...

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Reorientation in the French election

Financial Times has this chart up about the voters for the National Front, which is Marie Le Pen's party. I find the chart very hard to decipher, even though I usually like the dot plot format. The first thing to figure out is not visual. It's a definition of the data. The average voter represents those who voted in the 2015 regional election. The National Front voters are those who...

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What does lying politicians have in common with rainbow colors?

Readers in Charlotte, NC: I am coming your way on April 19. Drop by and say hi. More info on my lecture here. *** Daily Kos printed this chart about the lies that candidates told: (see original here) This is an almost great chart. A color make-over improves readability significantly. What does lying politicians have to do with rainbow colors? Avoid.

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Your charts need the gift of purpose

Via Twitter, I received this chart: My readers are nailing it when it comes to finding charts that deserve close study. On Twitter, the conversation revolved around the inversion of the horizontal axis. Favorability is associated with positive numbers, and unfavorability with negative numbers, and so, it seems the natural ordering should be to place Favorable on the right and Unfavorable on the left. Ordinarily, I'd have a problem with...

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