privacy

1 posts
Every document copy stored on used digital photocopiers

CBS News picked up four used photocopiers and looked at the hard drives. There was a lot of private information stored in them: Nearly every digital copier built since 2002 contains a hard drive – like the one on your personal computer – storing an image of every document copied, scanned, or emailed by the machine. In the process, it’s turned an office staple into a digital time-bomb packed with...

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Facebook logs calls and text messages

Woo. Woo. Alex Hern reporting for The Guardian: In at least one previous version of the Messenger app, Facebook only told users that the setting would enable them to “send and receive SMS in Messenger”, and presented the option to users without an obvious way to opt out: the prompt offered a big blue button reading “OK”, and a much smaller grey link to “settings”. Nowhere in the opt-in dialogue...

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What Facebook and Google know about you

Facebook and Google (among other companies) know a lot about you through the services you use. Dylan Curran for The Guardian provides a rundown: This information has millions of nefarious uses. You say you’re not a terrorist. Then how come you were googling Isis? Work at Google and you’re suspicious of your wife? Perfect, just look up her location and search history for the last 10 years. Manage to gain...

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Steve Jobs on data privacy

From 2010, Steve Jobs on data privacy: Tags: privacy, Steve Jobs

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Predictive policing algorithms used secretly in New Orleans

Speaking of surveillance cities, Ali Winston for The Verge reports on the relationship between Palantir and New Orleans Police Department. They used predictive policing, which is loaded with social and statistical considerations, under the guise of philanthropy. Palantir gained access to personal records: In January 2013, New Orleans would also allow Palantir to use its law enforcement account for LexisNexis’ Accurint product, which is comprised of millions of searchable public...

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Smart surveilled city

Smart home. Smart city. They have a positive ring to it, as if the place or thing will know what we want right when we need it and adjust accordingly. It’s all very grand. That’s assuming the new technologies are all used for good things. Geoff Manaugh for The Atlantic considers what might happen when the sensors and new data streams are used against individuals: As the city becomes a...

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The personal data you generate when you book a flight

Every time we book a flight, a Passenger Name Record is generated and saved by an outdated system, which links to private travel data. Paz Pena, Leil-Zahra Mortada and Rose Regina Lawrence for the Tactical Technology Collective outline that data and describe the consequences of the system failing to keep data private. But although the PNR system was originally designed to facilitate the sharing of information rather than the protection...

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Secret army bases seen in public fitness tracking map

Last year, fitness tracking app Strava released a high detail map of public activity data. Looking more closely, security student Nathan Ruser noticed activity in various parts of the globe that revealed secret US army bases. Alex Hern for The Guardian reports: Zooming in on one of the larger bases clearly reveals its internal layout, as mapped out by the tracked jogging routes of numerous soldiers. The base itself is...

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800 pages of Tinder data

Judith Duportail, writing for the Guardian, requested her personal data from dating service Tinder. She got back 800 pages of all the information she voluntarily gave away. As I flicked through page after page of my data I felt guilty. I was amazed by how much information I was voluntarily disclosing: from locations, interests and jobs, to pictures, music tastes and what I liked to eat. But I quickly realised...

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Uber got hacked and then paid the hackers $100k to not tell anyone

This is fine. Totally normal. Eric Newcomer reporting for Bloomberg: Hackers stole the personal data of 57 million customers and drivers from Uber Technologies Inc., a massive breach that the company concealed for more than a year. This week, the ride-hailing firm ousted its chief security officer and one of his deputies for their roles in keeping the hack under wraps, which included a $100,000 payment to the attackers. Ugh....

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