Quartz

3 posts
Iceberg scale, as described in different countries

A giant iceberg broke off from Antartica. Like, really big. Quartz collected the comparisons made in various countries to make the numbers more relatable to readers. As news traveled around the world that one of the largest icebergs ever observed had finally broken off from Antarctica, reporters were faced with a question of scale. Few among us can visualize just how large a 2,200 square-mile (5,698 square-kilometer) hunk of ice...

0 0
Circle drawing as an indicator for culture

Thu-Huong Ha and Nikhil Sonnad for Quartz looked at the doodling dataset from Google, in search of cultural differences hidden in how we draw circles around the world. We used the public database from Quick, Draw! to compare how people draw basic shapes around the world. Our analysis suggests that the way you draw a simple circle is linked to geography and cultural upbringing, deep-rooted in hundreds of years of...

0 0
California looks green again

In case you didn’t hear, California had a bit of a drought problem for the past few years. We complained about not enough rain constantly, and we finally got a lot of it this year. Now we complain that there’s too much rain (because you know, we have to restore balance). On the upside, the state looks a lot greener and less barren these days. David Yanofsky for Quartz has...

0 0
How much the US imports from Mexico

Most goods imported from Mexico are untaxed under the North American Free Trade Agreement. The Administration wants to tax those billions of dollars of goods coming in. David Yanofsky for Quartz plotted the imported products. Quartz gathered import data from the US Census Bureau comprising 6,011 hierarchical product categories, the amount imported, and the tax collected. Every product the US buys at least $1 million worth from Mexico is shown...

0 0
Where people use certain words

Nikhil Sonnad for Quartz mapped the top 100,000 words used in tweets. Search to your heart’s content. The data for these maps are drawn from billions of tweets collected by geographer Diansheng Guo in 2014. Jack Grieve, a forensic linguist at Aston University in the United Kingdom, along with Andrea Nini of the University of Manchester, identified the top 100,000 words used in these tweets and how often they are...

0 0
Piecing together satellite images

You might think piecing together satellite imagery is a straightforward task of lining up latitude and longitude points. But if you think that, you haven’t actually worked with these things. David Yanofsky, part of the Quartz Things Team, describes how he processes satellite images for one coherent image and how you can to. He starts at downloading the data, moves into stitching together a mosaic, and then adjusting the color...

0 0
We spend more at restaurants than at grocery stores

For decades, Americans spent more money at the grocery store than at eating and drinking establishments. It’s not like that anymore, Quartz reports. Tags: eating, Quartz, spending

0 0
Quartz Atlas opening up to creators

Last year Quartz announced Atlas, which was a place to find all of their charts. Now they’re slowly opening up their platform, namely the chart-making tool, so that others can make charts and share their own data. Why might you want to create charts with Atlas? It’s a chance to use our widely acclaimed charting tool, which makes it easy to visualize data in a simple, consistent, and mobile-friendly style....

0 0
Antibiotic history and the winning bacteria

We take antibiotics. Bacteria dies, but some lives, evolves and develops a resistance to the antibiotic. To better understand why this is such a problem, Keith Collins for Quartz provides a scrolling history of antibiotic development through a series of charts. The animated transitions between charts keep you connected through the text. Although this feels more like it should be a stepper. The boxed text kind of gets in the...

0 0
Guide for dealing with bad data

Enter the real world of data and statistics, and you find that files aren't always neatly wrapped with a bow and delimited fields. Christopher Groskopf, who recently joined Quartz, provides an “exhaustive reference” to deal with the real stuff. Most of these problems can be solved. Some of them can't be solved and that means you should not use the data. Others can't be solved, but with precautions you can...

0 0