satellite

1 posts
Landsat satellite imagery browser

Downloading and viewing satellite imagery is a bit of a process. There are lot of images, and pictures aren’t taken in the exact same spot (because they’re taken from a satellite). The Landsat Viewer makes the viewing a bit easier. Just click and drag the area, select the source, and you’re off. There may or may not be wizardry involved. Tags: Esri, satellite

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California looks green again

In case you didn’t hear, California had a bit of a drought problem for the past few years. We complained about not enough rain constantly, and we finally got a lot of it this year. Now we complain that there’s too much rain (because you know, we have to restore balance). On the upside, the state looks a lot greener and less barren these days. David Yanofsky for Quartz has...

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Detailed time-lapse of everywhere on Earth

A few years back, Google released a time-lapse feature in Google Earth that let you see change through satellite imagery. They updated the feature last week. It’s more detailed and higher resolution than the first version, based on the pixels from about five million images. We took the best of all those pixels to create 33 images of the entire planet, one for each year. We then encoded these new...

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Visualizing the U.S.-Mexican border

There’s been a lot of talk about building a wall at the U.S.-Mexican border lately. Seems straightforward enough, right? Just put some bricks up and be done with it. Well, it’s not really that easy, just from a logistics standpoint. Nevermind the politics. Josh Begley for the Intercept grabbed satellite images for the 1,954 miles of boundary line and then strung together the 200,000 images in a time-lapse to show...

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Finding the wet princes of Bel Air

In case you didn’t know, there’s a drought here in California so there are rules for when you can and can’t water your grass and plants. Not everyone adheres to those rules though. And some households really don’t follow the rules. In Los Angeles, or more specifically, Bel Air, there are a handful of households using millions of gallons per year. Michael Corey and Lance Williams for Reveal used satellite...

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Oil fires in Iraq seen from above

Though far away, there’s still a lot you can see, as the NASA Earth Observatory notes: On August 17, 2016, the Operational Land Imager (OLI) on Landsat 8 acquired an image (above) of dense smoke plumes roughly 50 kilometers (30 miles) south of Mosul. There appear to be multiple sources of fire, most likely oil wells from the Qayyarah oil field. The images in the grid below show the plumes...

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Piecing together satellite images

You might think piecing together satellite imagery is a straightforward task of lining up latitude and longitude points. But if you think that, you haven’t actually worked with these things. David Yanofsky, part of the Quartz Things Team, describes how he processes satellite images for one coherent image and how you can to. He starts at downloading the data, moves into stitching together a mosaic, and then adjusting the color...

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Visual search tool for satellite imagery

Terrapattern is a fun prototype that lets you search satellite imagery simply by clicking on a map. For example, you can click on a tennis court, and through machine learning, the application looks for similar areas. Terrapattern uses a deep convolutional neural network (DCNN), based on the ResNet (“Residual Network”) architecture developed by Kaiming He et al. We trained a 34-layer DCNN using hundreds of thousands of satellite images labeled...

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Dramatic Coastline Changes Around Korea’s Main Airport

When we travel to and from South Korea, we’re often forced to trek out to Incheon International Airport (this country’s Dulles). The massive airport, located on an island about an hour west of Seoul, opened in 2001 and is now one of the largest and busiest in the world. I had no idea, until today, how dramatically the shoreline around the airport has changed in the last three decades. Previously...

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Changing river path seen through satellite images

Sedimentary geologist Zoltan Sylvester downloaded Landsat data using Earth Explorer and strung together images of the Ucayali River to see the changes over thirty years. Thanks to the Landsat program and Google Earth Engine, it is possible now to explore how the surface of the Earth has been changing through the last thirty years or so. Besides the obvious issues of interest, like changes in vegetation, the spread of cities,...

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