Specialty plots

31 posts
The less-is-more story, and its meta

The Schwab magazine has an interesting discussion of a marketing research study purportedly showing "less is more" when it comes to consumer choice. They summarized the experimental setup and results in the following succinct graphic: The data consist of nested proportions. For example, among those seeing display 1, 60% stopped to look at the jams, and among those who stopped, 3% purchased. The nesting is presented as overlap in this...

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Some like it packed, some like it piled, and some like it wrapped

In addition to Xan's "packed bars" (which I discussed here), there are some related efforts to improve upon the treemap. To recap, treemap is a design to show parts against the whole, and it works by packing rectangles into the bounding box. Frequently, this leads to odd-shaped rectangles, e.g. really thin and really tall ones, and it asks readers to estimate relative areas of differently-scaled boxes. We often make mistakes...

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What do we think of the “packed” bar chart?

Xan Gregg - my partner in the #onelesspie campaign to replace terrible Wikipedia pie charts one at a time - has come up with a new chart form that he calls "packed bars". It's a combination of bar charts and the treemap. Here is an example of a packed barchart, in which the top 10 companies on the S&P500 index are displayed: What he's doing is to add context to...

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Light entertainment: Colorful circle of life

World Economic Forum can do better than this...  

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Making the world a richer place #onelesspie #PiDay

Xan Gregg and I have been at it for a number of years. To celebrate Pi Day today, I am ridding the world of one pie chart. Here is a pie chart that is found on Wikipedia: Here is the revised chart: It's been designed to highlight certain points of interest. I find the data quite educational. These are some other insights that are not clear from the revised chart:...

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Here are the cool graphics from the election

There were some very nice graphics work published during the last few days of the U.S. presidential election. Let me tell you why I like the following four charts. FiveThirtyEight's snake chart This chart definitely hits the Trifecta. It is narrowly focused on the pivotal questions of election night: which candidate is leading? if current projections hold, which candidate would win? how is the margin of victory? The chart is...

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Lining up the dopers and their medals

The Times did a great job making this graphic (this snapshot is just the top half): A lot of information is packed into a small space. It's easy to compose the story in our heads. For example, Lee Chong Wai, the Malaysian badminton silver medalist, was suspended for doping for a short time during 2015, and he was second twice before the doping incident. They sorted the athletes according to...

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Raining, data art, if it ain’t broke

Via Twitter, reader Joe D. asked a few of us to comment on the SparkRadar graphic by WeatherSpark. At the time of writing, the picture for Baltimore is very pretty: The picture for New York is not as pretty but still intriguing. We are having a bout of summer and hence the white space (no precipitation): Interpreting this innovative chart is a tough task - this is a given with...

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Showing three dimensions using a ternary plot

Long-time reader Daniel L. isn't a fan of this chart, especially when it is made to spin, as you can see at this link: Like other 3D charts, this one is hard to read. The vertical lines are both good and bad: They make the one dimension very easy to read but their very existence makes one realize the challenges of reading the other dimensions without guidelines. This dataset allows...

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