sports

3 posts
Who’s Competing at Pyeongchang? A Breakdown By Sports, Nations, Genders

More than 2,900 athletes from 92 nations and territories are competing in the Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea. The event has 15 different sports (and many events within each). Which sports have the most athletes? Hockey, which requires a 23-person roster, leads the list, followed by largely individual sports, such as alpine and cross-country skiing: Here’s how those sports break down by the number of competing countries. Again, alpine...

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Which Countries Sent the Most Athletes to Pyeongchang?

Because I live in Seoul and work as a journalist, I’m paying close attention to the Winter Olympics as they open tonight in Pyeongchang, South Korea. I don’t know much about the Winter Games’ history, so I decided first to research which countries are here. Europe dominates: Here’s a world map (Russia has many athletes here, but they’re not eligible for medals because of a doping scheme): And a table,...

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Roger Federer career in rankings and wins

Professional tennis player Roger Federer won his 20th Grand Slam title recently. He’s in year 20 of his career, and over time, he rose, he dominated, he declined, and he came back. Schweizer Radio and Fernsehen visualized Federer’s achievements over the years and compared him to other tennis stars in the process. It reminds me of the Serena Williams piece by The Los Angeles Times a while back. This one...

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A gem among the snowpack of Olympics data journalism

It's not often I come across a piece of data journalism that pleases me so much. Here it is, the "Happy 700" article by Washington Post is amazing.   When data journalism and dataviz are done right, the designers have made good decisions. Here are some of the key elements that make this article work: (1) Unique The topic is timely but timeliness heightens both the demand and supply of...

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Where athletes in professional sports come from

Sports are growing more international with respect to the athletes. Gregor Aisch, Kevin Quealy, and Rory Smith for The Upshot show by how much, with a focus on leagues in Europe and North America. I like how: The dominant home country in each chart doubles as background and a layer; the tooltip shades the country you moused over while still showing the other countries; and the missing data and gaps...

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Light entertainment: this looks like a bar chart

Long-time reader Daniel L. said this made him laugh. This prompted me revive a feature I used to run on here called "Light entertainment." Dataviz work that are so easy to ridicule that one wonders if they weren't just made for the laughs. See all previous installments here. Daniel also said it fails the Trifecta Checkup. What is the question the chart is addressing and what's the message? It's a...

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Report from the NBA Hackathon 2017

Yesterday, I had the honor of being one of the judges at the NBA Hackathon. This is the second edition of the Hackathon, organized by the NBA League Office's analytics department in New York, led by Jason Rosenfeld, pictured here speaking to the crowd: The event was a huge draw - lots of mostly young basketball enthusiasts testing their hands at manipulating and analyzing data to solve interesting problems. I...

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Hidden oil patterns on bowling lanes

This explainer video by Vox on the oil patterns on bowling lanes was oddly fascinating. The varying degrees of oil can change a professional bowler’s strategy as a tournament progresses. I kind of want to be a professional bowler now. This whole data thing is probably a fad anyways. Tags: bowling, sports, Vox

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The Warriors’ Championship Path

As expected, this time, the Golden State Warriors won the championship last night. Go Dubs. Tags: basketball, sports, Warriors

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LeBron James passed Michael Jordan in playoff points

As a Golden State Warriors fan, I am obligated to dislike LeBron James, but there is no denying that he is a great basketball player. James recently passed Michael Jordan for playoff points with number 5,995, and he’s got plenty left in the tank it seems. Adam Pearce for The New York Times shows the point trajectory with a return of the scrolling visualization. Tags: basketball, New York Times, sports

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