Statistical Visualization

1 posts
Catalog of visualization types to find the one that fits your dataset

There are a lot of visualization methods to choose from, and it can be daunting finding the right visual for your data, especially for those just starting out. The Data Viz Project by ferdio is a work-in-progress catalog that aims to make the picking process a bit easier. Start with a bunch of chart types and filter by things like shape, purpose, and data format. If you’re stuck, this should...

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Killings of blacks by whites ruled “justified”

In a collaboration between The Marshall Project and The Upshot, Daniel Lathrop and Anna Flagg analyzed data for 400,000 homicides between 1980 and 2014. In almost 17 percent of cases when a black man was killed by a non-Hispanic white civilian over the last three decades, the killing was categorized as justifiable, which is the term used when a police officer or a civilian kills someone committing a crime or...

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Game of Thrones character chart, you decide

I’ve never seen this Game of Thrones show, but I suspect this will be relevant to many. The Upshot made an interactive that asks readers to place characters on a two-axis chart. The x-axis spans evil to good, and the y-axis spans ugly to beautiful. The result is the above, plus contour plots for each character’s place in the space. Like I said, I don’t anything about the show, but...

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Voronoi diagram of people in the park

From Rod Bogart, a Voronoi diagram of people sitting in Bryant Park. It’s a self-optimizing system to maximize sitting space. Tags: voronoi

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Hotter and hotter summers, extremely hot

Climate scientist James Hansen and team looked at summer temperatures over several decades. The New York Times charted the increases. To create the bell curves, Dr. Hansen and two colleagues compared actual summer temperatures for each decade since the 1980s to a fixed baseline average. During the base period, 1951 to 1980, about a third of local summer temperatures across the Northern Hemisphere were in what they called a “near...

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An interactive to explain histograms, for normal people

Histograms require some statistical knowledge to grasp, and without the tidbits, the distribution chart looks like any other bar chart. So much more though. They can show a lot about your data, and statisticians start nearly every analysis with at least one. Aran Lunzer and Amelia McNamara provide a visual essay to explain how they work, so that you too can reap the rewards. Tags: distribution, histogram

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Boost economy with immigration

Want to increase the GDP? Easy. Let more immigrants in. Lena Groeger for ProPublica: In an analysis for ProPublica, Adam Ozimek and Mark Zandi at Moody’s Analytics, an independent economics firm, estimated that for every 1 percent increase in U.S. population made of immigrants, GDP rises 1.15 percent. So a simple way to get to Trump’s 4 percent GDP bump? Take in about 8 million net immigrants per year. To...

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Gender representation in comic books

Amanda Shendruk for The Pudding analyzed how genders are represented differently in comic books, focusing on “naming conventions, types of superpowers, and the composition of teams to see how male and female genders are portrayed.” The charts are good, but I’m pretty sure the animated GIFs for a handful of female characters make the piece. Tags: comics, gender, The Pudding

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Peak times for leisure and sports

The American Time Use Survey asks people what they do during the day. Activities are split into categories. One of those is sports and leisure, which is further broken down into more specific things like biking and basketball. Henrik Lindberg charted the relative peak times for these subcategories using overlaid area charts. Fun. Lindberg made it in R, and you can grab the data and code here. Tags: time use

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Temperature simulation near the Earth’s core

Researchers are building models to simulate the Earth’s core. From CNRS News: Take a journey to the center of the Earth—as far as its outer core, at least—and you’ll find a swirling mass of metal, mainly iron, kept in liquid form by the region’s intense heat. Temperature and pressure variations across this layer cause the melted metal to rise in hotter zones and to sink in cooler ones—convection movements that...

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