Statistical Visualization

1 posts
Frequency trails chart explainer

Frequency trails, or currently better known as joyplots, is a visualization method to show multiple distributions at once. Taken individually, each distribution is shown as a density curve, and they overlap each other for a three-dimensional effect. Luis Carli provides an interactive explainer for the method. I haven’t been able to put my finger on it, but I think there’s something about the overlapping that sort of serves as a...

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Visualizing nonlinear stories

Many stories don’t follow a linear format. There are flashbacks, or multiple timelines run simultaneously. Story Curves is a research project that tries to visualize the back and forth. Story curves visualize the nonlinear narrative of a movie by showing the order in which events are told in the movie and comparing them to their actual chronological order, resulting in possibly meandering visual patterns in the curve. The main part...

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Triangulate a picture

Triangulate, a fun tool made by Michael Freeman, lets you upload a picture and it randomly assigns points to output something that looks pixelated but with triangles. Give it a try. Tags: Delaunay, images

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How fake data goes viral

BuzzFeed describes how an article on Daily Mail — that falsely reported claims and data about climate change — went viral. Seven months since publishing, the British site finally admitted they were wrong, long after they got all their clickbait traffic I am sure. This doesn’t surprise me, as I had poor experiences with Daily Mail, but it does surprise me that such a large site is allowed to keep...

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Nine rounds a second

The New York Times used sonification along with a dot plot to demonstrate the speed of gunfire in Las Vegas. They compared it to the shooting in Orlando and an automatic weapon. It is possible that the Las Vegas gunman modified his gun to fire faster. This could include using a trigger crank, a mechanical add-on that is rotated like a music box handle and hits the trigger multiple times...

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Given your income, most beneficial tax breaks

With the release of the Republican proposed tax plan, Reuben Fischer-Baum and Kevin Schaul look at where deductions and tax credits are currently. Enter your adjusted gross income or click and drag a slider and the areas shift in the chart to show the most beneficial, given the income. Naturally, I now await to see how this contrasts with the plan. Tags: taxes, Washington Post

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Comparing the strength of Hurricane Irma against previous hurricanes

For perspective, The New York Times compares the strength of Hurricane Irma to hurricanes from the past 50 years that reached Category 3. They transition through three views in the scroller, which would probably be too advanced on their own, but I think the short notes and focus on Irma gets the charts over the hump. Tags: hurricane, New York Times

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Thirty years of hurricanes

After their graphic for thirty years of floods, Axios follows up with thirty years of Atlantic hurricanes. Each area represents the wind speed and time of a hurricane, and color represents the category. Tags: Axios, hurricane

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Using an audience’s own data to highlight both play and security

This is great. Daniel Goddemeyer and Dominikus Baur made Data Futures, which collects multiple choice answers from audience members and then allows the speaker to interact and visualize the results on stage, as well as highlight audience members. I’m imagining this project restructured in a college statistics course with several hundred unwitting students. Seems like a great learning opportunity. Tags: audience, mobile, talk

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He vs. She in film screenplay direction

In screenplays, there are directions that tell actors and actresses what to do or what’s happening other than dialogue. Julia Silge and The Pudding studied which direction is written more often for women and more often for men. More specifically, they looked for the actions that followed “he” and “she” and then tabulated which were more likely for each gender, so you end up with things like snuggle, giggle, and...

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