Statistics

142 posts
Trolling the uncertainty dial

During the election last year, The New York Times ran an uncertainty dial to show where the vote was swaying. Not everyone appreciated it. Many people hate it. The Outline disliked it enough to troll with an uncertainty dial of their own. Personally, I like the dial, but I think it does require a certain level of statistical knowledge to not lose your marbles watching it. Tags: uncertainty

0 0
A guide for using open data to combat corruption

Open Up: A Guide to Using Open Data to Combat Corruption is free for download. A broad understanding of corruption recognises that it is not just about isolated acts between two different agents: the one who offers a bribe, and the one who receives it. Instead, corruption is a complex crime. It is driven by networks of officials, professional intermediaries and companies. So in order to tackle corruption effectively, you...

0 0
Data Everywhere, Statisticians Anywhere

I had the honor to deliver the commencement speech at the UCLA Statistics graduation this past weekend. I’m going to put this here for posterity before my memory tucks it away never to be uttered again. I truncated the speech last minute, so these notes are little more coherent than my delivery. A big congratulations to all of you! It took a lot of work, a lot of distributions, sampling,...

0 0
Circle drawing as an indicator for culture

Thu-Huong Ha and Nikhil Sonnad for Quartz looked at the doodling dataset from Google, in search of cultural differences hidden in how we draw circles around the world. We used the public database from Quick, Draw! to compare how people draw basic shapes around the world. Our analysis suggests that the way you draw a simple circle is linked to geography and cultural upbringing, deep-rooted in hundreds of years of...

0 0
Normal coffee

Nerd humor: Asked for a normal coffee ☕ pic.twitter.com/JoakebV9xN — Matt Moores (@MooresMt) June 14, 2017 That barista deserves a tip. Tags: humor

0 0
Gun emoji usage analysis

Jane Solomon collected tweets that used the gun emoji, and looked at what emojis were used before and after as a way to see how people used the gun. It seems that the sarcastic and reflexive gun emoji pairings are extremely popular, which matches my expectations and the knowledge I brought into this exercise. One result that surprised me was the high collocation with the gun and various heart emoji....

0 0
Past and future of data analysis

Roger Peng, a biostatistics professor at John Hopkins University, talks about the past and future of data analysis, using music as a metaphor for the path. Tags: data analysis, Roger Peng

0 0
Past and future of data analysis

Roger Peng, a biostatistics professor at John Hopkins University, talks about the past and future of data analysis, using music as a metaphor for the path. Tags: data analysis, Roger Peng

0 0
Shocker: ease of use requires expanding, not restricting, choices

Recently, I noted how we have to learn to hate defaults in data visualization software. I was reminded again of this point when reviewing this submission from long-time reader & contributor Chris P. The chart is included in this Medium article, which credits Mott Capital Management as the source. Look at the axis labels on the right side. They have the hallmarks of software defaults. The software designer decided that...

0 0
A pretty good chart ruined by some naive analysis

The following chart showing wage gaps by gender among U.S. physicians was sent to me via Twitter: The original chart was published by the Stat News website (link). I am most curious about the source of the data. It apparently came from a website called Doximity, which collects data from physicians. Here is a link to the PR release related to this compensation dataset. However, the data is not freely...

0 0