Washington Post

9 posts
How far you can drive out of the city in one hour

Using anonymized cell phone data from Here Technologies, Sahil Chinoy for The Washington Post mapped how far you can drive out of major cities during various times of the day. I used to do the kind of math — as I muttered in rage driving out of Los Angeles during rush hour, which by the way is four hours long. Tags: commute, Washington Post

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Visualizing electoral college politics: exercise in displaying relationships between variables

Reader Berry B. sent in a tip quite some months ago that I just pulled out of my inbox. He really liked the Washington Post's visualization of the electoral college in the Presidential election. (link) One of the strengths of this project is the analysis that went on behind the visualization. The authors point out that there are three variables at play: the population of each state, the votes casted...

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Satellite view of the upcoming eclipse’s path

In case you didn’t hear, a solar eclipse is on the way that will be visible on August 21. The total solar eclipse will be visible along a path across the country. The Washington Post, continuing their coverage of the topic, shows the path from above using satellite imagery. See also: every total solar eclipse ever. Tags: eclipse, Washington Post

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Every solar eclipse in your lifetime

The continental United States gets a total solar eclipse on August 21, so Denise Lu for The Washington Post mapped out every total solar eclipse that will happen in your lifetime. Enter the year you were born and see the paths on the globe. Tags: eclipse, Washington Post

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Unintentional deception of area expansion #bigdata #piechart

Someone sent me this chart via Twitter, as an example of yet another terrible pie chart. (I couldn't find that tweet anymore but thank you to the reader for submitting this.) At first glance, this looks like a pie chart with the radius as a second dimension. But that is the wrong interpretation. In a pie chart, we typically encode the data in the angles of the pie sectors, or...

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Baseball hitting angles on the rise

After the crackdown on performance-enhancing drugs, home runs in professional baseball dipped the past few years. They seem to be back up though, and new metrics on hitting angle might have something to do with it. Dave Sheinin and Armand Emamdjomeh for The Washington Post delve into the angles, along with hit speed, and how they lead to more home runs. Tags: baseball, Washington Post

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NFL draft performance vs. expectations

Reuben Fischer-Baum for The Washington Post looks at professional football expectations given their draft picks versus performance. By comparing how much value teams should get given their set of picks with how much value they actually get, we can calculate which franchises make the most of their draft selections. Approximate Value (AV), a stat created by Pro Football Reference that measures how well a player performed overall in a season,...

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Senators and Reps whose voting doesn’t quite match the constituent’s

I know, it’s only April 2017, but some senators and representatives have some extra planning to as they figure out how to persuade midterm voters to re-elect them when the voters went a different direction for the presidential election. Kevin Schaul and Kevin Uhrmacher for The Washington Post use a scatterplot and scrollytelling to explain. Tags: voting, Washington Post

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Your charts need the gift of purpose

Via Twitter, I received this chart: My readers are nailing it when it comes to finding charts that deserve close study. On Twitter, the conversation revolved around the inversion of the horizontal axis. Favorability is associated with positive numbers, and unfavorability with negative numbers, and so, it seems the natural ordering should be to place Favorable on the right and Unfavorable on the left. Ordinarily, I'd have a problem with...

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Shifting national budget

The Washington Post looks at the shifting national budget over the past 40 years. Be sure to keep scrolling past the first overall to see the funding for departments separately. The consistent vertical scale works well. Tags: budget, government, Washington Post

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