Xan Gregg and I started a #onelesspie campaign a few years ago. On Pi Day each year, we find a pie chart, and remake it. On Wikipedia, you can find all manners of pie chart. Try this search, and see for yourself.

Here's one found on the Wiki page about the city of Ogema, in Canada:

Ogema_Stats_canada_pie_chart

This chart has 20 age groups, each given a different color. That's way too much!

I was able to find data on 10-year age groups, not five. But the "shape" of the distribution is much easily seen on a column chart (a histogram).

Redo_ogema_age_distribution

Only a single color is needed.

The reason why I gravitated to this chart was the highly unusual age distribution... this town has almost uniform distribution of age groups, with each of the 10-year ranges accounting for about 11% of the population. Given that there are 9 groups, a perfectly even distribution would be 11% for each column. (Well, the last group of 80+ is cheating a bit as it has more than 10 years.)

I don't know about Ogema. Maybe a reader can explain this unusual age distribution!

 

 

 

Tags:
junkcharts
http://junkcharts.typepad.com/junk_charts/

Comments are closed.