Take a look at the following chart, and guess what message the designer wants to convey:

Wsj_brokercensus

This chart accompanied an article in the Wall Street Journal about Wells Fargo losing brokers due to the fake account scandal, and using bonuses to lure them back. Like you, my first response to the chart was that little has changed from 2015 to 2017.

It is a bit mysterious the intention of the whitespace inserted to split the four columns into two pairs. It's not obvious that UBS and Merrill are different from Wells Fargo and Morgan Stanley. This device might have been used to overcome the difficulty of reading four columns side by side.

The additional challenge of this dataset is the outlier values for UBS, which elongates the range of the vertical axis, squeezing together the values of the other three banks.

In this first alternative version, I play around with irregular gridlines.

Jc_redo_wsjbrokercensus1

Grouped column charts are not great at conveying changes over time, as they cause our eyes to literally jump over hoops. In the second version, I use a bumps chart to compactly highlight the trends. I also zoom in on the quarterly growth rates.

Jc_redo_wsjbrokercensus2

The rounded interpolation removes the sharp angles from the typical bumps chart (aka slopegraph) but it does add patterns that might not be there. This type of interpolation however respects the values at the "knots" (here, the quarterly values) while a smoother may move those points. On balance, I like this treatment.

Tags:
junkcharts
http://junkcharts.typepad.com/junk_charts/

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