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Salary and Occupation

Stating the obvious, salaries vary across occupations. Here are some charts that show by how much for 800 of them. Read More

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Making the most detailed map of auto emissions in America

Using estimates from the Database of Road Transportation Emissions, Nadja Popovich and Denise Lu for The New York Times mapped auto emissions at high granularity. Popovich described their process on Storybench: I want to make graphics that really resonate with people. If that is your goal as a visual journalist, something to think through is just how you can tie data back to a more human experience. To kind of...

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✚ The Best Visualization Course I Ever Took; Membership Update with New Points of View (The Process #65)

This week I reminisce back to when I didn't know anything about visualization, and all I wanted to do was solve analysis problems. Also, some fun updates on the way, exclusively for members. Read More

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Graph literacy, in a sense

Ben Jones tweeted out this chart, which has an unusual feature: What's unusual is that time runs in both directions. Usually, the rule is that time runs left to right (except, of course, in right-to-left cultures). Here, the purple area chart follows that convention while the yellow area chart inverts it. On the one hand, this is quite cute. Lines meeting in the middle. Converging. I get it. On the...

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Why scientists need to be better at visualization

For Knowable Magazine, Betsy Mason looks at the state of (not so good) data visualization in science and offers some direction for how it can improve: [S]cience is littered with poor data visualizations that confound readers and can even mislead the scientists who make them. Deficient data visuals can reduce the quality and impede the progress of scientific research. And with more and more scientific images making their way into...

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Growing Your Visualization Toolset (and Mine), a FlowingData Membership Update

It’s time to kick the tires on some new tools. I’ve been running FlowingData Membership for almost eight years now, and one of the main benefits is that you get unlimited access to step-by-step tutorials. They’re based on my experiences analyzing and visualizing data. This is great, because you get first-hand, practical advice on how to make any chart instead of hand-wavy tips with a semi-usable template. The downside is...

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Map of nighttime lights normalized by population

You’ve probably seen the composite map of lights at night from NASA. It looks a lot like population density. Tim Wallace adjusted the map for population, so that you can see (roughly) the areas that produce more light per person. Adjusting NOAA nighttime lights for population reveals areas that create an outsized amount of light per person living there. pic.twitter.com/k91cGyWvLd — Tim Wallace (@wallacetim) November 10, 2019 Tags: lights, population,...

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£Billions UK Pounds Visualized

UK election time and all parties, as per usual, are blasting £BILLIONS into the headlines. Here’s some fresh visualized context for those numbers. Created by @vizsweet. » See the visualisation » See the data

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How Much You Should Be Saving for Retirement

There are a lot of variables to consider, but for people of middle income, here's a suggestion, based on when you start saving and when you want to retire. Read More

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xkcd-style charts in JavaScript

For xkcd fans, here’s a JavaScript library by Tim Qian that lets you style your charts like xkcd. There’s something about sketchy, comic-style charts that makes the data feel more approachable. Maybe just because it’s different or looks more casual? I mean, I would use the style sparingly and maybe not in your next business meeting, but it’s kind of fun to mess with. You can also do this in...

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