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Tongue in cheek but a master stroke

Andrew jumped on the Benford bandwagon to do a tongue-in-cheek analysis of numbers in Hollywood movies (link). The key graphic is this: Benford's Law is frequently invoked to prove (or disprove) fraud with numbers by examining the distribution of first digits. Andrew extracted movies that contain numbers in their names - mostly but not always sequences of movies with sequels. The above histogram (gray columns) are the number of movies...

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Data visualization activities for kids

Nightingale has a kid’s section with printable visualization activities. Get the kids started early while they absorb information like a sponge. Tags: kids, Nightingale

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✚ Dot Patterns – The Process 157

Welcome to issue #157 of The Process, the newsletter for FlowingData members about how the charts get made. I’m Nathan Yau, and this week I’m admiring how dots can be used to show both high granularity and overall patterns. Become a member for access to this — plus tutorials, courses, and guides.

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Humorous charts to organize thoughts

When I’m feeling confused about what’s going on around me, I gravitate towards making charts, so Michelle Rial’s book of charts, Maybe This Will Help: How to Feel Better When Things Stay the Same, resonates. It’s available for pre-order. Tags: book, humor, Michelle Rial

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Beautiful News, a book charting the good things in the world

From David McCandless and team, who you might know from such books as Information is Beautiful and Knowledge is Beautiful has a new book on Beautiful News: Inspired by our ongoing Beautiful News project, the book surfaces and visualises the amazing, beautiful, positive things *still* happening in the world. Things we can’t always see because we’re fixated on the negativity of the news. As per our previous books, this one...

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A little stitch here, a great graphic is knitted

The Wall Street Journal used the following graphic to compare hurricanes Ida and Katrina (link to paywalled article). This graphic illustrates the power of visual communications. Readers can learn a lot from it. The paths of the storms can be compared. The geographical locations of the landfalls are shown. The strengthening of wind speeds as the hurricanes moved toward Louisiana is also displayed. Ida is clearly a lesser storm than...

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Black neighborhoods split by highways

Rachael Dottle, Laura Bliss and Pablo Robles for Bloomberg on how urban highways often split communities: By the 1960s, the neighborhood’s business core was gone, replaced by newly constructed Interstate 94. Homes that had been a short walk to the shops now overlooked a six-lane highway shuttling commuters between the Twin Cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul. Homes and businesses were seized and destroyed under eminent domain. The neighborhood was...

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Where Americans Live

Everyone gets a dot. You get a dot. And you get a dot. And you.Read More

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A first look at our new book!

Announcing our new infographic mega-tome, Beautiful News, published soon by HarperCollins. Inspired by our ongoing Beautiful News project, the book surfaces and visualises the amazing, beautiful, positive things *still* happening in the world. Things we can’t always see because we’re fixated on the negativity of the news. As per our previous books, this one is a welter of beautiful facts & rigorous data, visualised in riotously colourful visualisations, charts & concept maps. The...

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Cases, hospitalizations, and deaths for vaccinated vs. unvaccinated

The CDC released a chart that shows case, hospitalization, and death rates for fully vaccinated (blue) against not fully vaccinated (black). As you might expect, the rates for the fully vaccinated are much lower, especially for hospitalizations and deaths. Tags: CDC, coronavirus, unvaccinated, vaccination

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