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Datawrapper updates pricing structure, do more for free

Datawrapper, a focused web tool that makes online charts easier to put together and share, changed their pricing structure. There used to be a couple of paid tiers for individuals and small teams, but now you get more for free. And even though it’s free: We won’t sell your data. Some companies make the user into the product, but this is not our business model. All data you upload to...

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Using old ship logs as a window into the weather in the 1800s

For Reuters, Feilding Cage describes a weather time machine project by NOAA that uses old shipping logs to build climate models for the 19th century: In the 19th and early 20th centuries, millions of weather observations were carefully made in the logbooks of ships sailing through largely uncharted waters. Written in pen and ink, the logs recorded barometric pressure, air temperature, ice conditions and other variables. Today, volunteers from a...

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✚ Moratorium On Bar Chart Races; When Impractical Visualization is More Practical (The Process #68)

The dataisbeautiful subreddit announced a moratorium on the ever popular bar chart race. The frequency of submissions that used the method got out of hand and spam made it all the less savory. Still, the method holds value. Read More

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Haikus generated based on your map location and OpenStreetMap data

Satellite Studio made a map thing that generates haikus based on OpenStreetMap data and your location. From the announcement: [W]e automated making haikus about places. Looking at every aspect of the surroundings of a point, we can generate a poem about any place in the world. The result is sometimes fun, often weird, most of the time pretty terrible. Also probably horrifying for haiku purists (sorry). This is pretty great....

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How Job Groups Changed Over the Past Seven Decades

In the 1950s, almost half of all employed people were either in farming or manufacturing. As you can imagine, work changed a bit over the years. Read More

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AI-generated pies

Janelle Shane applied her know-how with artificial intelligence to generate new types of pies that the world has never seen: People wonder about what it would be like if a super-intelligent AI decided to place all of humanity in a realistic simulation. I wonder what it would be like if the simulation were built by today’s AI instead – whose computing power is somewhere around the level of an earthworm’s....

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Everything in the universe

In this video, Dominic Walliman attempts to illustrate and explain all of the known things in the universe. There’s also a poster version. Tags: Dominic Walliman, space

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All the Foreign Bodies That Got Stuck

Many things get stuck in people's bodies. This is the percentage breakdown for the most common objects that end up in the emergency room. Read More

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✚ Visualization Tools, Datasets, and Resources — November 2019 Roundup (The Process #67)

Every month I collect new visualization tools, datasets, and resources. Here is the good stuff for November. Read More

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Scroll, scroll, scroll through the depths of the ocean

The oceans are deep. But how deep and what’s down there? Neal Agarwal provides this piece, The Deep Sea, that scales the depths of the ocean to your browser window. Scroll, scroll, and then scroll some more to see what sea life (and other things) reside at various depths. Agarwal’s Size of Space piece from last month explores the size of space in a similar vein. It’s equally fun. This...

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