Bees use social distancing

Research by M. Pusceddu et al. shows that honeybees use social distancing when a parasite is introduced to the hive. In a parasite-free hive, activities are spread throughout the hive, whereas clusters form when parasites are detected. The Economist illustrated the difference with a grids of dot densities. Tags: bees, Economist, social distancing

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Emissions and energy usage from Ethereum network

It seems clear that Ethereum (and other cryptocurrencies) in its current state is bad for the environment, but it’s hard to say how bad it really is. Kyle McDonald estimated emissions and energy usage to try to understand better: “Ethereum is comparable to keeping 2-3 coal power plant running.” See McDonald’s real-time estimates here. Tags: cryptocurrency, emissions, Ethereum, Kyle McDonald

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FlowingData Shop is Open, Temporarily

I’m opening the print shop for a few days. Get your order in, and I’ll try my best to get it to you before Christmas.

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✚ Visualization Tools and Resources, November 2021 Roundup

Welcome to issue #167 The Process, the newsletter for FlowingData members that looks closer at how the charts get made. I’m Nathan Yau, and we’re back from Thanksgiving. I hope you were able to take some time off. Every month I collect tools and resources to help you make better charts. This month I’m including some job listings too, as there were some that caught my eye. Here’s the good...

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Rapidly growing African cities

In a multi-faceted piece, The Washington Post described the rapidly growing cities in Africa that are projected to be the most populated cities in the world: In three projections by the University of Toronto’s Global Cities Institute, Africa accounted for at least 10 of the world’s 20 most populous cities in 2100. Even in the institute’s middle-of-the-road development scenario, cities that many Americans may seldom read about, such as Niamey,...

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Bird power rankings

Using data from Project FeederWatch, which is a community tracking project to count birds around feeders, Miller et al. estimated the pecking order among 200 species. This was in 2017. For The Washington Post, Andrew Van Dam and Alyssa Fowers worked with the researchers for an updated ranking using a more comprehensive dataset. The result is bird power rankings 2021 edition. Tags: birds, ranking, Washington Post

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Thanksgiving Ravine

That’s a lot of email. Tags: email, Thanksgiving

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Simpson’s Paradox in vaccination data

This chart, made by someone who is against vaccinations, shows a higher mortality rate for those who are vaccinated versus those who are not. Strange. It shows real data from the Office of National Statistics in the UK. As explained by Stuart McDonald, Simpson’s Paradox is at play: [W]ithin the 10-59 age band, the average unvaccinated person is much younger than the average vaccinated person, and therefore has a lower...

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Inflation in the context of age generations

When you compare the price of things today against prices one year ago, almost everything increased in cost at a rapid rate. While out of the ordinary, it’s definitely not the first time this happened. The New York Times zoomed out to show year-over-year price change since 1960, framing the timeline in the context of age generations. Zoom into the data super close, and every blip can seem like a...

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Map made of candy corn to show corn production

With candy corn as her medium, Jill Hubley mapped corn production in the United States, based on data from the USDA. With just three hues of yellow, orange, and white and three heights to match, Hubley was able to clearly show the geographical patterns. For reference, here is the USDA corn map: Finally, I have a use for my kids’ leftover Halloween candy. Tags: candy, corn, Jill Hubley, physical

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