How the American Work Day Changed in 15 Years

The American Time Use Survey recently released results for 2018. That makes 15 years of data. What's different? What's the same? Read More

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Modern reproduction of an 1868 catalog of flower illustrations

Nicholas Rougeux, who has a knack and the patience to recreate vintage works in a modern context, reproduced Elizabeth Twining’s Illustrations of the Natural Orders of Plants: If someone told me when I was young that I would spend three months of my time tracing nineteenth century botanical illustrations and enjoy it, I would have scoffed, but that’s what I did to reproduce Elizabeth Twining’s Illustrations of the Natural Orders...

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Make charts that ask readers to predict the line

A few years ago, The New York Times asked readers to guess a trend line before showing the actual data. It forced readers to test their own beliefs against reality. TheyDrawIt from the MU Collective is a tool that lets you make similar prediction charts: These line graphs encourage readers to reflect on their own beliefs by predicting the data before seeing it. Only after they draw a prediction does...

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✚ Select Your Weapon (The Process #48)

Some people love the Tidyverse in R. Others are less fond of it. For me, the more tools the better. Read More

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Data-driven hipster reading list

When it comes to reading lists, we usually look for what’s popular, because if a lot of people read something, then there must be something good about it. Russell Goldenberg and Amber Thomas for The Pudding took it the other direction. Using checkout data from the Seattle Public Library, they looked for books that haven’t been checked out in decades. Also: How cool is it that there’s an API to...

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Bachelor’s Degree Movers

As industries change and interests shift, some bachelor's degrees grow more popular while others become less so. Read More

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Atlas of all the moons in our solar system

National Geographic went all out on their atlas of moons. Space. Orbits. Rotating and interactive objects in the sky. Ooo. You’ll want to bookmark this one for later, so you can spend time with it. Tags: moon, National Geographic, space

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Animated maps of seasonal Earth

As you might expect, NASA collects a lot of data, and much of it is seasonal. Eleanor Lutz animated a few maps to show the detail: To show a few examples, the NASA Earth Observations website includes data on seasonal fire incidence (1), vegetation (2), solar insolation, or the amount of sunlight (3), cloud fraction (4), ice sheet coverage (5), and processed satellite images (6). My own map (7) combines...

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Cost of a Census undercount

The citizenship question for the upcoming Census is still stuck in limbo. One of the arguments against the question is that it could lead to a significant undercount in population, which can lead to less funding. For Reuters, Ally J. Levine and Ashlyn Still show how this might happen with a highlight on federal programs that rely on population estimates. Tags: census, Reuters, undercount

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What is R, what it was, and what it will become

Roger Peng provides a lesson on the roots of R and how it got to where it is now: Chambers was referring to the difficulty in naming and characterizing the S system. Is it a programming language? An environment? A statistical package? Eventually, it seems they settled on “quantitative programming environment”, or in other words, “it’s all the things.” Ironically, for a statistical environment, the first two versions did not...

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