Democratic candidates who Iowa fairgoers could name

In a “radically unscientific survey” Kevin Uhrmacher and Kevin Schaul for The Washington Post asked 59 Iowa State Fair attendees if they could name Democratic candidates. Participants circled the ones they knew. Above are the results in aggregate. I’m less interested in the results since I’m not so sure about the small sample, but the visual is fun. The scribble scrabble look is representative of the fuzzy dataset, and I...

0 0
Measuring pop music’s falsetto usage

Vox and Matt Daniels delved into falsetto in pop music over the years. Is falsetto a big trend now compared to the rest of the history? The process of finding the answer, noisy data and all, was just as interesting as the answer itself. Tags: falsetto, Matt Daniels, music, Vox

0 0
✚ Annotate Charts to Help Your Data Speak, Because the Data Has No Idea What It Is Doing (The Process #52)

This week, we talk annotation and how it can make your charts more readable and easier to understand. Read More

0 0
Predicting whether you are Democrat or Republican

The New York Times is in a quizzy mood lately. Must be all the hot weather. Sahil Chinoy shows how certain demographics tend towards Democrat or Republican, with a hook that that lets you put in your own information. A decision tree updates as you go. Reminds of the Amanda Cox decision tree classic from 2008. Tags: decision tree, Democrat, demographics, quiz, Republican, voting

0 0
Everyday charts book

Add a book to the humorous-charts-documenting-the-everyday genre. Am I Overthinking This? by Michelle Rial charts the everyday. I like how Rial uses everyday objects to show everyday data informally. [Amazon link] Tags: book, humor

0 0
Most Unliked Sandwich

Which sandwich do people not like the most? The winner: the Cheese and Tomato, if that even counts as an actual sandwich. Read More

0 0
Warped shape of the galaxy

Dorota M. Skowron et al. made the first 3-D map of the galaxy. Sean Greene and Andrea Roberson reporting for the Los Angeles Times: Astronomers have understood since the 1950s that the galaxy is curved, but until now, they’ve based that idea on models and indirect measurements. Over a six-year period, the researchers took more than 100 images of the galaxy from their observatory in the Chilean Andes. In particular,...

0 0
Why you shouldn’t use ZIP Codes for spatial analysis

For Carto, Matt Forrest explains why you shouldn’t use ZIP codes for spatial analysis: The problem is that zip codes are not a good representation of real human behavior, and when used in data analysis, often mask real, underlying insights, and may ultimately lead to bad outcomes. To understand why this is, we first need to understand a little more about the zip code itself. In a nutshell, ZIP Codes...

0 0
How an earthquake can trigger others on the opposite side of the world

Speaking of earthquakes, Will Chase looked back at a 2012 earthquake in Sumatra that triggered not only a bunch of small ones in the vicinity, but other large ones around the world: In the ten days following the Sumatra mainshock, 44 earthquakes M5.5+ were recorded. The statistics were clear: this nine-fold increase was highly significant, and most researchers agreed the likely explanation was remote triggering by the M8.6 Sumatra earthquake....

0 0
Earthquake trigger

For The New York Times, Derek Watkins used animated maps to show how a large earthquake can lead to thousands of small ones. Living in California, I’ve experienced a handful of these, but it had been a while before feeling one a few weeks ago. I may or may not have immediately started looking at earthquake insurance. Tags: Derek Watkins, earthquake, New York Times

0 0