book

37 posts
Book review: Visualizing Baseball

I requested a copy of Jim Albert’s Visualizing Baseball book, which is part of the ASA-CRC series on Statistical Reasoning in Science and Society that has the explicit goal of reaching a mass audience. The best feature of Albert’s new volume is its brevity. For someone with a decent background in statistics (and grasp of basic baseball jargon), it’s a book that can be consumed within one week, after which...

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Sprawlball, an in-depth look into the evolution of modern basketball

If you’ve seen a basketball shot chart in the past few years, it was probably made or inspired by the work of Kirk Goldsberry. Coming from a cartography and data visualization background, Goldsberry applied his skills to basketball data, and he has a new book called Sprawlball. It tells the story of how this modern era of shooting threes at high volume came to be. Come for the charts: Stay...

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Sprawlball, an in-depth look into the evolution of modern basketball

If you’ve seen a basketball shot chart in the past few years, it was probably made or inspired by the work of Kirk Goldsberry. Coming from a cartography and data visualization background, Goldsberry applied his skills to basketball data, and he has a new book called Sprawlball. It tells the story of how this modern era of shooting threes at high volume came to be. Come for the charts: Stay...

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Book Preview: How Charts Lie, by Alberto Cairo

If you’re like me, your first exposure to data visualization was as a consumer. You may have run across a pie chart, or a bar chart, perhaps in a newspaper or a textbook. Thanks to the power of the visual language, you got the message quickly, and moved on. Few of us learned how to create charts from first principles. No one taught us about axes, tick marks, gridlines, or...

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A visualization book using only hand-drawn illustrations

RJ Andrews has a visualization design book coming out in January called Info We Trust. He hand-drew about 300 graphics for the book. One of the reasons: I decided very early that Info We Trust would not use any existing images, mine or others. Found examples work fine for certain books. They are also convenient, the work is already done! But found images bring baggage too. You might choose an...

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Report from Data Visualization Meetup

On Monday, Principal Analytics Prep sponsored the Data Visualization Meetup, organized by the indefatigable Naomi Robbins. The keynote speaker is NYU professor Kristen Sosulski, who just published a book titled “Data Visualization Made Simple” (link). At the Meetup, we announced a Part-Time Immersive Program. This allows the completion of the Certified Data Specialist program in three levels on a more relaxed, evening schedule. Level 1 will run two nights a...

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A collection of Charles-Joseph Minard’s statistical graphics

Charles-Joseph Minard, best known for a graphic he made (during retirement, one year before his death) showing Napoleon’s March, made many statistical graphics over his career. The Minard System from Sandra Rendgen is a collection of these works. The first section is background on Minard, his famed graphic, and his process, but really, you get it for the collection of vintage graphic goodness. [Amazon link] Tags: book, Charles-Joseph Minard

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Create your own visual journal of data

Giorgia Lupi and Stefanie Posavec continue on their path of Dear Data with a book that you draw in: Observe, Collect, Draw! The first section describes some of the basics of journaling with data and how you can use various visual encodings. However, the main part of the book is a journal that guides you through collection and the visual encodings that Lupi and Posavec used with their postcards. First,...

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Nigel Holmes new illustrated book on Crazy Competitions

Nigel Holmes, the graphic designer known for his playful illustrated graphics, has a new book: Crazy Competitions. It’s exactly what it sounds like. Whether it’s flinging frozen rats or parading in holly evergreens, racing snails or carrying wives, human beings have long displayed their creativity in wild, odd, and sometimes just wonderful rituals and competitions. To show what lengths we’ll go to uphold our eccentric customs, British American graphic designer...

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Hans Rosling wrote a book on Factfulness

Hans Rosling was able to build excitement around data like no other. Truth and progress was his rally cry. Before he died, he was working on a book with his Gapminder co-founders Anna Rosling Rönnlund and Ola Rosling. The book, Factfulness: Ten Reasons We’re Wrong About the World—and Why Things Are Better Than You Think, is out now. Ordered and looking forward to it. Tags: book, facts, Hans Rosling, world

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