climate change

8 posts
Increasing ocean temperatures, decreasing ice

For National Geographic, Kennedy Elliot made a series of heatmaps that show the relative shifts in the ocean: The oceans don’t just soak up excess heat from the atmosphere; they also absorb excess carbon dioxide, which is changing the chemistry of seawater, making it more acidic. “Ocean acidification is one simple and inescapable consequence of rising atmospheric CO2 that is both predictable and impossible to attribute to any other cause,”...

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Light installation shows future water lines against existing structures

Timo Aho and Pekka Niittyvirta used sensors, LED lights, and timers to display future water lines: By use of sensors, the installation interacts with the rising tidal changes; activating on high tide. The work provides a visual reference of future sea level rise. The installation explores the catastrophic impact of our relationship with nature and its long term effects. The work provokes a dialogue on how the rising sea levels...

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How fast emissions would reduce if other plans were adopted

The United States is doing pretty poorly in reducing emissions. For The New York Times, Brad Plumer and Blacki Migloiozzi, show the current status and what could happen if the U.S. adopted more drastic plans already in place around the world. The moving particles underneath the trend line is a nice touch to bring the abstract closer to what the data represents. Contrast this piece with Plumer’s piece from a...

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3-D tube chart of global CO2 concentration and temperature

Because you can never have enough time series charts that show increases of CO2 and temperature over decades. By Kevin Pluck: Differing from the variations we’ve seen before, time is on the circle, and the metrics are on the vertical. Then it rotates for dramatic effect. See also the the two-dimensional Cartesian version from Bloomberg and the polar coordinate version by Ed Hawkins. There are also plenty more temperature charts....

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Cities projected to be under water by 2100

Using Climate Central sea-level rise estimates, The Guardian plots and maps the potential consequences of a 3.2-degree rise in temperature by 2100. One of the biggest resulting threats to cities around the world is sea-level rise, caused by the expansion of water at higher temperatures and melting ice sheets on the north and south poles. Scientists at the non-profit organisation Climate Central estimate that 275 million people worldwide live in...

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Carbon emissions goals vs. current paths

Brad Plumer and Nadja Popovich reporting for The New York Times: Under the Paris deal, each country put forward a proposal to curtail its greenhouse-gas emissions between now and 2030. But no major industrialized country is currently on track to fulfill its pledge, according to new data from the Climate Action Tracker. Not the European Union. Not Canada. Not Japan. And not the United States, which under President Trump is...

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Iceberg scale, as described in different countries

A giant iceberg broke off from Antartica. Like, really big. Quartz collected the comparisons made in various countries to make the numbers more relatable to readers. As news traveled around the world that one of the largest icebergs ever observed had finally broken off from Antarctica, reporters were faced with a question of scale. Few among us can visualize just how large a 2,200 square-mile (5,698 square-kilometer) hunk of ice...

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Houston flooding on the rise

Climate change is doing some weird stuff. What were once rare weather events could grow more common. ProPublica and The Texas Tribune zoom in on Houston, where there’s likely to be much more flooding than usual and not enough residents prepared for the rise. scientists say climate change is causing torrential rainfall to happen more often, meaning storms that used to be considered “once-in-a-lifetime” events are happening with greater frequency....

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