Climate

13 posts
Low temperatures map of the United States

Based on data from the Global Forecast System, The New York Times mapped the lowest temperatures across the country between February 14 and 16. The blue-orange color scale diverges at freezing, which creates a striking image of a very cold country. The dotted lines and temperature labels make the patterns especially obvious. As someone who lives in an orange area, I was shocked by all of the blue. Stay safe....

0 0
Interactive data essays on climate change

In their second issue, Parametric Press focuses on climate change with a set of interactive data essays: The articles explore the gamut of our climate’s past, present, and future, exploring not only what has happened (and is happening) but also what should happen, and what we as citizens should do to realize that future. In this issue you will find a personalized history of Earth’s CO2 record, a close look...

0 0
Racist housing policy from 1930s and present-day temperature highs

Brad Plumer and Nadja Popovich for The New York Times show how policies that marked black neighborhoods as “hazardous” for real estate investment led to a present-day with fewer trees and higher temperatures. The maps that shift back and forth between past districting and how things are now show the picture clearly. This goes hand-in-hand with how tree-cover and neighborhood incomes are also tightly coupled. Tags: climate, housing, New York...

0 0
Global warming color stripes, as decorative conversation starter

Ed Hawkins, who you might recognize from charts such as spiraling global temperature and the aforementioned temperature grid, encourages you to show your stripes. Select your region, and see how average temperature increased. I saw this last year, but I just realized that people are using this chart to print, knit, and decorate. Emmalie Dropkin made a blanket: Pueblo Vida Brewing and the University of Arizona Climate Systems Center used...

0 0
Climate change displayed, with shower tiles

Based on a chart by Ed Hawkins, the shower wall of Gretchen Goldman and Tom Di Liberto transformed into a canvas to show global warming. Each row represents a country, and each cell — I mean tile — represents the temperature difference compared to the overall average for the time period. Tags: climate, global warming, physical, shower

0 0
Visual guide for the fires in Australia

For The Guardian, Niko Kommenda and Josh Holder provide a visual guide to the bushfires in Australia: Satellite data from Nasa showed a stark increase in the number of fire detections in November and December compared with previous years. Satellites detect fire “hotspots” by measuring the infrared radiation emitted by the blazes. In previous years, between 2,000 and 3,000 such hotspots were recorded each December in the south-east, while in...

0 0
Arctic ice melting

One way to gauge the amount of ice in the Arctic is to look at the average age of the ice. From the NASA Scientific Visualization Studio, the map above shows the estimated age of ice on a monthly basis, going back to 1984: One significant change in the Arctic region in recent years has been the rapid decline in perennial sea ice. Perennial sea ice, also known as multi-year...

0 0
Using old ship logs as a window into the weather in the 1800s

For Reuters, Feilding Cage describes a weather time machine project by NOAA that uses old shipping logs to build climate models for the 19th century: In the 19th and early 20th centuries, millions of weather observations were carefully made in the logbooks of ships sailing through largely uncharted waters. Written in pen and ink, the logs recorded barometric pressure, air temperature, ice conditions and other variables. Today, volunteers from a...

0 0
Making the most detailed map of auto emissions in America

Using estimates from the Database of Road Transportation Emissions, Nadja Popovich and Denise Lu for The New York Times mapped auto emissions at high granularity. Popovich described their process on Storybench: I want to make graphics that really resonate with people. If that is your goal as a visual journalist, something to think through is just how you can tie data back to a more human experience. To kind of...

0 0
Hotter days where you were born

It’s getting hotter around the world. The New York Times zooms in on your hometown to show the average number of “very hot days” (at least 90 degrees) since you were born and then the projected count over the next decades. Then you zoom out to see how that relates to the rest of the world. I’ve always found it interesting that visualization and analysis are typically “overview first, then...

0 0