Climate

49 posts
Mapping extreme heat

For Bloomberg, Marie Patino reports on the shifting design choices for mapping weather extremes. The rainbow color scheme and sunny icons aren’t cutting it anymore. Tags: Bloomberg, climate, color, heat

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Mapping the cool spots in hot cities

As city centers heat up, people search for cooler areas. For Bloomberg Green, Laura Millan, Hayley Warren and Jeremy Scott Diamond mapped the neighborhoods for a handful of hot cities that have something to cool the area: Satellite images produced by the European Space Agency, working in part with data from NASA and the US Geological Survey, now have a high enough resolution to allow for temperature variations to be...

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A plea to stop climate change from the guy who makes maps

For Washington Post Opinion, a struggling mapmaker makes a plea to stop climate change, because there are no more suitable colors left in the spectrum to show hot: My point is, unless you are here with some kind of innovative new color that is clearly hotter than red and won’t create these ambiguities, our only alternative is to stop climate change. If you won’t do it for the charismatic megafauna...

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Timelines for record temperatures

Speaking of the heat wave in Europe, Pierre Breteau for Le Monde charted record high temperatures using a step chart for each weather station in France: These graphs represent, for a part of the 146 stations for which Météo-France provided us with the data, the level of the most extreme temperatures ever recorded and their date. The data are fragmentary because it is difficult to go back beyond the 1990’s,...

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Melting popsicles to visualize a heat wave

Many European countries are experience record high temperatures, so The Washington Post used melting popsicles to attach something relatable to the numbers and standard heatmap. But: It turns out that it takes popsicles much longer to melt than we had expected. In this unscientific experiment, the shortest melt time was around 12 minutes, in 90 degrees Fahrenheit, under Madrid’s beating sun. It took as long as 50 minutes earlier in...

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Pollution by the rich versus poor

Based on estimates from the World Inequality Lab, Bloomberg shows how wealthier individuals’ habits — not just countries’ activities — contribute more to overall carbon emissions. There’s a 3-D grid map with a square for each country. It transitions from the usual way of looking at national carbon emissions to carbon emissions from the wealthy who live everywhere. You can always count on Bloomberg to keep their graphics spicy. Tags:...

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Days since record-high temperatures

Here’s a fun/alarming weather map from The Pudding. Using data from the Applied Climate Information System, they show the number of days since a record-high temperature in hundreds of U.S. cities. The counters are in the style of those signs in factories that show days since the last injury. Tags: climate, Pudding, temperature

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Mapping the probable heat around the world

Earth is getting warmer, and the previously abstract concept seems to grow more concrete every day. Probable Futures mapped increasing heat, decreasing cold, and shifting humidity under different warming scenarios. You have the global view shown above, and then when you zoom in enough, you can click on grid cells for the model estimates. Dots on the map point to a handful of short stories on how warming has changed...

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Climate normals mapped over time

Every decade the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration releases climate normals to provide a baseline to compare current weather against. NOAA just released the estimates for 1991 to 2020. As you might expect, and shown in the maps above, it’s getting hotter. Tags: climate, NOAA, normal

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Cooling Gulf Stream

This is quite a dive by Moises Velasquez-Manoff and Jeremy White for The New York Times. They look at the potential danger of melting ice from Greenland flowing into the Gulf Stream. An animated map of currents and temperature, reminiscent of NASA’s Perpetual Ocean from 2011, shows what’s going on underwater. The piece flies you through as you scroll with a familiar view as if you’re in space looking down....

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