color

89 posts
Trying too hard

Today, I return to the life expectancy graphic that Antonio submitted. In a previous post, I looked at the bumps chart. The centerpiece of that graphic is the following complicated bar chart. Let's start with the dual axes. On the left, age, and on the right, year of birth. I actually like this type of dual axes. The two axes present two versions of the same scale so the dual...

0 0
Color palette generator

In the never-ending quest to find the perfect color scheme for any given situation at any given moment, Coolors is another set of tools to find the right shades for your application. The twist is that there’s a generator that shows you schemes based on inputs, such as a certain hue or a photograph. There is also a list of trending palettes. Tags: color, generator

0 0
Speedometer charts: love or hate

Pie chart hate is tired. In this post, I explain my speedometer hate. (Also called gauges,  dials) Next to pie charts, speedometers are perhaps the second most beloved chart species found on business dashboards. Here is a typical example:   For this post, I found one on Reuters about natural gas in Europe. (Thanks to long-time contributor Antonio R. for the tip.) The reason for my dislike is the inefficiency...

0 0
Another reminder that aggregate trends hide information

The last time I looked at the U.S. employment situation, it was during the pandemic. The data revealed the deep flaws of the so-called "not in labor force" classification. This classification is used to dehumanize unemployed people who are declared "not in labor force," in which case they are neither employed nor unemployed -- just not counted at all in the official unemployment (or employment) statistics. The reason given for...

0 0
Mapping extreme heat

For Bloomberg, Marie Patino reports on the shifting design choices for mapping weather extremes. The rainbow color scheme and sunny icons aren’t cutting it anymore. Tags: Bloomberg, climate, color, heat

0 0
Funnels and scatters

I took a peek at some of the work submitted by Ray Vella's students in his NYU dataviz class recently. The following chart by Hosanah Bryan caught my eye: The data concern the GDP gap between rich and poor regions in various countries. In some countries, especially in the U.K., the gap is gigantic. In other countries, like Spain and Sweden, the gap is much smaller. The above chart uses...

0 0
A plea to stop climate change from the guy who makes maps

For Washington Post Opinion, a struggling mapmaker makes a plea to stop climate change, because there are no more suitable colors left in the spectrum to show hot: My point is, unless you are here with some kind of innovative new color that is clearly hotter than red and won’t create these ambiguities, our only alternative is to stop climate change. If you won’t do it for the charismatic megafauna...

0 0
Diagram of watercolors from the 17th century

In 1692, artist A. Boogert published a guide to watercolors, showing the thousands of possibilities of mixing 31 shades. Nicholas Rougeux, as per his specialty, modernized the work into an interactive diagram. Tags: color, Nicholas Rougeux

0 0
Who trades with Sweden

It's great that the UN is publishing dataviz but it can do better than this effort: Certain problems are obvious. The country names turned sideways. The meaningless use of color. The inexplicable sequencing of the country/region. Some problems are subtler. "Area, nes" - upon research - is a custom term used by UN Trade Statistics, meaning "not elsewhere specified". The gridlines are debatable. Their function is to help readers figure...

0 0
A German obstacle course

A twitter user sent me this chart from Germany. It came with a translation: "Explanation: The chart says how many car drivers plan to purchase a new state-sponsored ticket for public transport. And of those who do, how many plan to use their car less often." Because visual language should be universal, we shouldn't be deterred by not knowing German. The structure of the data can be readily understood: we...

0 0