coronavirus

203 posts
How N95 masks work

In efforts to reduce further spread of the virus, the US is set to distribute millions of free N95 masks across the country. Aaron Steckelberg and Bonnie Berkowitz for The Washington Post illustrated how the masks work. Early in the pandemic, N95 masks were hard to get. My wife, who is a healthcare worker, described how she and her colleagues would have to reuse N95 masks and store them in...

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Death rates by vaccination booster status

Our World in Data continues their important work on providing and showing up-to-date Covid data. Most recently, they updated death rates in Switzerland by vaccination plus booster status. The rates for the unvaccinated are expectedly much higher, but also the rates for those with a booster are multiples lower than those fully vaccinated with no booster. Tags: coronavirus, mortality, Our World in Data, vaccination

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Spiral graph to show Covid-19 cases

This spiralized chart by Gus Wezerek and Sara Chodosh for NYT Opinion has sparked discussions on what it means to communicate data. A lot of people don’t like it. I’m gathering my thoughts, but I think it’s fine for two main reasons: (1) it’s a lead-in to an opinion piece and (2) it’s not trying to replace the straight-up linear views that we’ve grown uncomfortably familiar with over two-plus years....

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What the omicron numbers tell us and do not tell us

May Louise Kelly for NPR spoke briefly with biostatistics professor Natalie Dean on the omicron surge and what we can take away from the data: Yeah, I mean, the public health impact is made up a lot of different things, and we’re most acutely interested in severe disease and death. But, of course, infections have impacts and we think about the disruption – you know, all the people who are...

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Covid-19 mortality before and after vaccine eligibility

Denise Lu and Albert Sun for The New York Times show the shifts in Covid-19 deaths among different demographic groups: The change in death rates among groups is starker by race and ethnicity, and the death rate has risen particularly sharply for middle-aged white people. Covid-19 now accounts for a much larger share of all deaths for that group than it did before vaccines were widely available. In a series...

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A catalog of all the Covid visualizations

The COVID-19 Online Visualization Collection is a project to catalog Covid-related graphics across countries, sources, and styles. They call it COVIC for short, which seems like a stretch for an acronym and a confusing way to introduce a project to people. But, it does categorize over 10,000 figures, which could be useful as a reference and historical context. Tags: collection, coronavirus

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Vaccination rates compared against country wealth

Vaccine supply is only part of the equation. For The New York Times, Keith Collins and Josh Holder looked at distribution of available doses in countries, categorized by income group. Tags: coronavirus, New York Times, vaccination

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Flowchart for pandemic supply chain issues

Lazaro Gamio and Peter S. Goodman for The New York Times used a flowchart to explain how the world’s supply chains got to where they are now. The scroll takes you through the set of intertwining variables. Tags: coronavirus, New York Times, supply

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Simpson’s Paradox in vaccination data

This chart, made by someone who is against vaccinations, shows a higher mortality rate for those who are vaccinated versus those who are not. Strange. It shows real data from the Office of National Statistics in the UK. As explained by Stuart McDonald, Simpson’s Paradox is at play: [W]ithin the 10-59 age band, the average unvaccinated person is much younger than the average vaccinated person, and therefore has a lower...

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Euler diagram to illustrate base rate fallacy

Some people point out that vaccinated people are still hospitalized as a defense against getting vaccinated. But they ignore the inverse which compares the number of those who are not hospitalized. Someone (source?) made this Euler diagram to illustrate the inverse. It’s about making a fair comparison. People who wear seat belts can still die in a car collision. People who use contraception can still get STIs. People who eat...

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