coronavirus

61 posts
An Incalculable Loss

The New York Times used their full front page to list 1,000 names of the 100,000 who died due to the virus. There is an online version, which is equally moving. Tags: coronavirus, deaths, New York Times

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They Were Us.

This is The New York Times front page for Sunday, May 24, 2020. Tags: coronavirus, front page, New York Times

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Moves towards reopening the country

Using anonymized cellphone data from SafeGraph, Reade Levinson and Chris Canipe for Reuters mapped the change in foot traffic for different types of businesses over time. Orange represents more movements since the first week of March. Blue means less. Yellow means about the same. We’re working towards all orange. Fingers crossed. Sidenote: Now isn’t really the time, but when it is, we’re gonna have to come back to this mobile...

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Bad denominator

With coronavirus testing, many governments have used the percentage of tests that came back positive over time to gauge progress and decide whether or not it’s time to reopen. To calculate percentage, they divide confirmed cases by total tests. The denominator — total tests — often comes from the CDC, which apparently hasn’t done a good job calculating that denominator, because not all tests are the same. Alexis C. Madrigal...

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✚ Improving the Georgia Cases Chart (The Process 090)

The Georgia Department of Public Health published a questionable chart showing confirmed Covid-19 cases over time. Intentionally misleading or poorly made chart? Read More

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Reopening states and how they currently measure up

States are reopening. Some seem ready, and some less so. Lena V. Groeger and Ash Ngu for ProPublica made a reference so that you can quickly see how your state is doing in five important metrics: To give people context on state reopenings, and what happens afterward, we are tracking metrics derived from a set of guidelines published by the White House for states to achieve before loosening restrictions. Even...

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Households that lost income

This straightforward grid map by Danielle Alberti for Axios shows the percentage of adults in a household where someone lost employment income. In all likelihood, you know someone affected in one way or another. The data comes from the Census Household Pulse Survey, which is an effort to gauge the impact of Covid-19. Tags: Axios, coronavirus, Danielle Alberti, unemployment

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Drawing the coronavirus

What does the coronavirus look like? Rebekah Frumkin for The Paris Review highlights various illustrations and renderings, focusing on why each looks the way it does: The disease that has put the entire world on pause is easily communicable, capable of stowing silently away in certain hosts and killing others, and, to the human eye, entirely invisible. In media parlance it’s become our “invisible enemy”: a nightmarish, oneiric force that...

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Florida data manager fired over transparency of Covid-19 data

Rebekah Jones, GIS manager for the Florida Department of Health, was fired a couple of weeks ago, apparently for making the state’s Covid-19 data more accessible and transparent. Florida Today reports on an email that Jones sent to researchers: She warned that she does not know what the new team’s intentions are for data access, including “what data they are now restricting.” “I understand, appreciate, and even share your concern...

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Where unemployment benefits are higher than lost wages

Economists at the University of Chicago analyzed unemployment benefits from the CARES act and compared them against median salaries for different occupations and by state. FiveThirtyEight highlighted the differences: The researchers uncovered other kinds of inequality, too. In some professions, like janitorial work, people who are employed by essential businesses are continuing to show up to their jobs under hazardous conditions. But in doing so, they may be eligible for...

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