coronavirus

95 posts
How air spreads on a subway train

If someone sneezes in a closed space, you hope that the area has good ventilation, because those sneeze particles are going to spread. The New York Times explains in the context of a subway train. Wear a mask. Tags: coronavirus, mask, New York Times, simulation, subway

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Visual explanation for how herd immunity works

Herd immunity works when you have enough people who are immune to a disease, maybe because they already got it or there’s a vaccine, so that the disease can’t spread anymore to those who don’t have a resistance. For The Washington Post, Harry Stevens is back with simulitis to demonstrate how this works in greater detail. It starts at the individual level, generalizes to a larger group, and then zooms...

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Distribution of unemployment at the tract level

We’ve been hearing a lot about national unemployment rate, but it’s not uniformly distributed across the country. Some areas are a lot higher, some places are a lot lower, and there are places in between. To see the variation across the United States, Yair Ghitza and Mark Steitz estimated unemployment at the tract level. Quoctrung Bui and Emily Badger for NYT’s The Upshot have the maps and histograms zooming in...

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What schools might look like if students go back

Dana Goldstein, with illustrations by Yuliya Parshina-Kottas, imagines what school might look like if students go back. Face shields, distancing, masks, and pods. I’m having trouble imagining any of this working in practice, especially with the young ones. Tags: coronavirus, New York Times, school

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If the unemployed lose $600 per week

A $600 per week benefit expires for the unemployed at the end of July. Congress is still deciding what to do after. For The New York Times, Ella Koeze highlights the percentage of usual income the unemployed will receive as a function of annual earnings and weekly benefit amount if the benefit goes away. Each dot represents a state. The percentage ranges in the background provide a point of reference...

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Wearing masks and infection rate

Studies suggest that wide adoption of masks can reduce the spread of the coronavirus. A meta-analysis by Ali Mokdad and his research group at the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation estimates at least a 30% reduction and up to 50%, which can lead to a big difference, as illustrated by Connie Jin for NPR: Wear the mask. Tags: Connie Jin, coronavirus, mask, NPR

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Comparing U.S. coronavirus case rates to other hot spots

The numbers are high here in the United States, and at this point, they look bad on their own. But compare it to other countries that are currently hit hard, the U.S. looks even worse. For The New York Times, Lauren Leatherby makes the comparisons. Tags: coronavirus, Lauren Letherby, New York Times, scale, scrollytelling

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Park sounds before and during the pandemic

With lockdown orders arounds the world, places that we’re allowed to go sound different. The MIT Senseable City Lab looked at this shift in audio footprint through the lens of public parks: Using machine learning techniques, we analyze the audio from walks taken in key parks around the world to recognize changes in sounds like human voices, emergency sirens, street music, sounds of nature (i.e., bird song, insects), dogs barking,...

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Remote work and industry

Some industries are more compatible with remote work than others. Jonathan I. Dingel and Brent Neiman at the University of Chicago estimated the scale of the differences. For Reuters, Sarah Slobin reports using a variable width bar chart to show likelihood of close contact with others against likelihood of in person work: Professional, management and technology jobs run the gamut from accountants and architects to lawyers, insurance underwriters and web...

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Understanding Covid-19 statistics

For ProPublica, Caroline Chen, with graphics by Ash Ngu, provides a guide on how to understand Covid-19 statistics. The guide offers advice on interpreting daily changes, spotting patterns over longer time frames, and finding trusted sources. Most importantly: Even if the data is imperfect, when you zoom out enough, you can see the following trends pretty clearly. Since the middle of June, daily cases and hospitalizations have been rising in...

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