coronavirus

7 posts
Case rates adjusted for the unvaccinated

Covid-19 cases in the United States were down, but they’re moving up again, mostly among the unvaccinated. Dan Keating and Leslie Shapiro for The Washington Post break down the comparisons by state. A difference chart for each state shows the overall rate compared against an adjusted rate for the unvaccinated population. As you might expect, the rate for the latter is always higher. There are three more points of reference....

0 0
Slowing and then renewed interest in getting vaccinated

When countries gained access to vaccines, there was an initial burst of vaccinations, but the rate leveled off in most places. Then a variant arrives, and an incentive or another push for vaccinations increases the rate. Reuters looks at the rate shift in different countries, in the context of trying to reach 70 percent vaccinated. The set of difference charts took me a minute to digest, but then seems straightforward...

0 0
India vaccine procurement compared to other countries

Prasanta Kumar Dutta and Manas Mishra reporting for Reuters on the slow rollout of Covid-19 vaccinations in India: Compared to many Western countries, India was late in procuring vaccines. Modi’s government placed the first advance order for an unapproved vaccine only this month, after being criticised for being slow. Countries including the United States and Britain signed orders last year. Tags: coronavirus, India, Reuters, vaccine

0 0
Hospitalization rates for the unvaccinated

Overall, Covid-19 cases and hospitalizations are down in the United States, but much of that is from vaccinations. When you look at only those who are not vaccinated, the rates are still high in many areas of the country. Dan Keating and Leslie Shapiro for The Washington Post show the differences. Tags: coronavirus, vaccination, Washington Post

0 0
Four types of people who prevent full vaccination

The United States vaccination rate was rolling for a while there, but it has slowed down. Sema Sgaier for NYT Opinion talks about why that is, breaking it down to four general types of people who are hesitant or don’t plan on getting vaccinated: After conducting a national survey of U.S. adults, we grouped people into distinct profiles based on their shared beliefs and barriers to getting the vaccine. This...

0 0
Coping with the big numbers

Connie Jin, who works for NPR and updates a Covid-19 dashboard, talks about in comic-form feeling numb to the large numbers and hot to deal. It comes back to the individual. Tags: comic, Connie Jin, coronavirus, NPR, scale

0 0
Map of people moving during pandemic

It was only a matter of time before someone showed dots moving across a map to show migration during the pandemic. Again, using USPS change of address data, Yan Wu and Luis Melgar for the Wall Street Journal (paywalled) showed where people moved in the country. As shown through other views, a lot of the movement wasn’t out of the ordinary, but in some areas — mainly San Francisco and...

0 0
‘Less than 10 percent’ outdoors

The CDC said that “less than 10 percent” of coronavirus cases were from outdoor transmissions. David Leonhardt for The New York Times argues why in all likelihood that number is way too high and leads to public confusion: If you read the academic research that the C.D.C. has cited in defense of the 10 percent benchmark, you will notice something strange. A very large share of supposed cases of outdoor...

0 0
Trending hobbies during the pandemic

This past year has seen a rising interest in long-lost hobbies due to shelter-in-place, social distancing, and lockdown orders. Google Trends and Polygraph charted the hobbies that saw the biggest spikes each day of the year. I’m surprised that sourdough or bread-making is on there, but maybe they didn’t fall under the hobby definition they used. Tags: coronavirus, Google, hobbies, Polygraph, trends

0 0
Pandemic migrations

With the restrictions of the pandemic, you might expect an unusually big wave of people leaving cities for more open space. Using USPS’s change of address data, Jed Kolko, Emily Badger and Quoctrung Bui, for NYT’s The Upshot, show that this was not quite the case. This surprised me, because I live in a suburban area that saw a flux of home buyers, which made prices approach ridiculous ranges. I...

0 0