Data Art

121 posts
Minimalist creative coding environment

tixy.land is a minimalist coding environment by Martin Kleppe: Control the size and color of a 16×16 dot matrix with a single JavaScript function. The input is limited to 32 characters – but no limits to your creativity! Fun. You can find a tiny bit more info here. Tags: dots, Martin Kleppe, minimalist

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Exploration of 12 timelines along Sunset Boulevard

In 1966, artist Ed Ruscha published Every Building on the Sunset Strip, which was a stiched collection of photos taken while driving along Sunset Boulevard. Ruscha continued to take pictures over the years. Getty and Stamen made the multi-year work available online with a unique explorer that lets you drive the drive along 12 timelines. Select your vehicle, the years, and move along the map. See also Eric Rodenbeck’s process...

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I am a book. I am a portal to the universe.

Stefanie Posavec and Miriam Quick have a new book out called I am a book. I am a portal to the universe. I’m different to any other book around today. I am not a book of infographics. I’m an informative, interactive experience, in which the data can be touched, felt and understood, with every measurement represented on a 1:1 scale. How long is an anteater’s tongue? How tiny is the...

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Elevation data molded in the base of a pint glass

North Drinkware molded Half Dome in the bottom of a hand-blown pint glass using elevation data from the United States Geological Survey. Wow. [via @blprnt] Tags: elevation, glass, Half Dome, North Drinkware

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Disappearing animals as a matrix of dots

Reddit user WhiteCheeks used dot density to show population counts of various animals. Each dot represents an animal. So animals with lower counts show less obviously. This is similar to the use of pixelation to show endangered species, which I think works better since the size of the dots above don’t encode anything. Tags: animals, extinction

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Stock market mountains

After seeing stoxart, I was reminded of Michael Najjar’s project High Altitude from 2010-ish. He used photos he captured while climbing Mount Aconcagua, the highest mountain in the Americas, as the backdrop for stock data: The series visualizes the development of the leading global stock market indices over the past 20-30 years. The virtual data mountains of the stock market charts are resublimated in the craggy materiality of the Argentinean...

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Stock market charts turned into illustrated landscapes

stoxart is a project by Gladys where she turns stock market chart to landscape illustrations. The peaks become mountains, the dips become a space for the moon and the stars. The above is an illustration for Purple, which specializes in mattresses, and its base chart which forms the landscape. Here’s another for Ford, with an apt illustration of a Ford truck riding the terrain: Grab a print here (or request...

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Using a slime mold simulation for generative art

Slime mold are single-celled organisms that can work together to form multicellular structures. Antonio Sánchez Chinchón used slime mold simulations generate these images: This post talks about a generative system called Physarum model, which simulates the evolution of a colony of extremely simple organisms that, under certain environmental conditions, result into complex behaviors. Apart from the scientific interest of the topic, this model produce impressive images like this one, that...

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A million dollars vs. a billion visualized with a road trip

A million dollars. A billion dollars. The latter is 1,000 times more than the former. Just add a few zeros, right? Tom Scott used a road trip to visualize the actual difference in scale. Scott starts by setting the baseline of a million dollars with a short, one-minute walk. Stack one million dollar bills after the other and it’s about the length of a football field. Stack one billion, and...

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Data visualization wallpaper

As a 100-day project, Alli Torban has been imagining what a data visualization designer’s wallpaper might look like through the years. She started in 1920, and with one design per year, she’s up to 1989. The focus on aesthetics shows slow shifts in colors and patterns through time. Although I feel like the early 1980s, when The Visual Display of Quantitative Information was first published, should look super minimalist with...

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