Data Art

1 posts
Data visualization wallpaper

As a 100-day project, Alli Torban has been imagining what a data visualization designer’s wallpaper might look like through the years. She started in 1920, and with one design per year, she’s up to 1989. The focus on aesthetics shows slow shifts in colors and patterns through time. Although I feel like the early 1980s, when The Visual Display of Quantitative Information was first published, should look super minimalist with...

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Meandering procedural river maps

Robert Hodgin built a procedural system he calls Meander to generate the beauty above, among several others: My all-time favorite map-based data visualization was created in 1944. Harold Fisk, working with the US Army Corp. of Engineers, mapped the length of the Mississippi River. What sets his visualization apart from others is that he maps the river through time, and manages to do so in a way that is both...

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Global warming color stripes, as decorative conversation starter

Ed Hawkins, who you might recognize from charts such as spiraling global temperature and the aforementioned temperature grid, encourages you to show your stripes. Select your region, and see how average temperature increased. I saw this last year, but I just realized that people are using this chart to print, knit, and decorate. Emmalie Dropkin made a blanket: Pueblo Vida Brewing and the University of Arizona Climate Systems Center used...

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Climate change displayed, with shower tiles

Based on a chart by Ed Hawkins, the shower wall of Gretchen Goldman and Tom Di Liberto transformed into a canvas to show global warming. Each row represents a country, and each cell — I mean tile — represents the temperature difference compared to the overall average for the time period. Tags: climate, global warming, physical, shower

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Social distancing demonstrated with balls and mousetraps

The Ohio Department of Health released this video to show the advantages of social distancing: That’s a lot of balls and mousetraps to setup. Tags: balls, commercial, coronavirus, mousetrap, Ohio

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Now pull

A comic by Marcos Balfagón attaches action to the curve. Tags: comic, coronavirus, curve

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Quilt that shows daily high and low temperatures

Reddit user quantum-kate used daily high and low temperatures in Denver in 1992 as the basis of this quilt. I feel like I should learn to knit. Tags: quilt, temperature

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Faking traffic on Google Maps with a wagon of 99 smartphones

Google Maps incorporates data from smartphones to estimate traffic in any given location. Artist Simon Weckert used this tidbit to throw the statistical models off the scent. With a wagon of 99 smartphones, he turned roads red on Google Maps just by walking around. Nice. Tags: Google Maps, physical, Simon Weckert, traffic

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Flow Fields, a generative art tool

Flow Fields, a generative art tool by Michael Freeman, lets you adjust various parameters, such as color, smoothness, and fluctuations, and the flows just keep coming. Pretty. The code is up on GitHub and is based on Daniel Shiffman’s Coding Train tutorials. Tags: flow, Mike Freeman

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Haikus generated based on your map location and OpenStreetMap data

Satellite Studio made a map thing that generates haikus based on OpenStreetMap data and your location. From the announcement: [W]e automated making haikus about places. Looking at every aspect of the surroundings of a point, we can generate a poem about any place in the world. The result is sometimes fun, often weird, most of the time pretty terrible. Also probably horrifying for haiku purists (sorry). This is pretty great....

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