election

46 posts
Fixing the ‘impeach this’ map with a transition to a cartogram

As discussed previously, the “impeach this” map has some issues. Mainly, it equates land area to votes, which makes for a lot of visual attention to counties that are big even though not many people live in them. So, Karim Douïeb used a clever transition to change the bivariate map to a cartogram. Now you can have a dual view. Tags: election, impeachment

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The ‘impeach this’ map has some issues

Philip Bump explains why the “impeach this” map is a bit dubious: By now, this criticism of electoral maps is taught in elementary schools. Or, at least, it should be. Those red counties in Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wyoming, for example, are home to 1.6 million 2016 voters — fewer than half of the number of voters in Los Angeles County. Trump won 1 million votes in those...

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Democratic candidates who Iowa fairgoers could name

In a “radically unscientific survey” Kevin Uhrmacher and Kevin Schaul for The Washington Post asked 59 Iowa State Fair attendees if they could name Democratic candidates. Participants circled the ones they knew. Above are the results in aggregate. I’m less interested in the results since I’m not so sure about the small sample, but the visual is fun. The scribble scrabble look is representative of the fuzzy dataset, and I...

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Mapping politically polarized cities

Rachael Dottle, for FiveThirtyEight, looked for political differences in cities and ranked them, based on precinct voting margins for the 2016 election: To see just how politically segregated America’s urban areas are, we used each city’s 2016 election results to calculate its dissimilarity index — basically, a number that tells us how separated its Republicans and Democrats are from one another, with higher numbers indicating more segregation. This technique is...

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More candidates and earlier

For Bloomberg, Lauren Leatherby and Paul Murray describe the heightened eagerness to enter the race for United States president. The stacked timelines, looking like squished bunches of Twizzlers, shows when people entered and withdrew during past election seasons. We’re 536 days out and 23 Democrats are in. In contrast, there were 8 around this time in 2008. Tags: Bloomberg, election

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Color distribution in campaign logos

In news graphics, blue typically represents Democrat and red represents Republican. However, the definition isn’t so clear-cut by actual party usage. Chris Alcantara for The Washington Post broke it down in 900 campaign logos used during the recent midterms. Each strip represents a logo. Tags: color, election, Washington Post

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✚ Election Visualization Circle of Life

Election night has become quite the event for newsrooms and graphics departments over the years, and the visualization production cycle has started to feel more familiar each time. Read More

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Midterm shifts versus the 2016 election

The Guardian goes with scaled, angled arrows to show the Republican and Democrat swings in these midterms for the House compared against those of 2016. It reminds me of the classic wind-like map by The New York Times from 2012, but the angles seem to give the differences a bit more room to breathe. Tags: difference, election, Guardian

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How a meme grew into a campaign slogan

A meme that cried “jobs not mobs” began modestly, but a couple of weeks later it found its way into a slogan used by the President of the United States. Keith Collins and Kevin Roose for The New York Times traced the spread of the meme through social media using a beeswarm chart. Blue represents activity on Twitter, yellow represents Facebook, and orange represents Reddit. Circles are sized by retweets,...

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Demographic effects on voting intention

The Economist built an election model that treats demographic variables like blocks that output a probability of voting Republican or Democrat: Our model adds up the impact of each variable, like a set of building blocks. As a result, a group of weak predictors that point in the same direction can cancel out a single strong one. In theory, the model could identify a black voter as a Republican leaner,...

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