election

40 posts
✚ Election Visualization Circle of Life

Election night has become quite the event for newsrooms and graphics departments over the years, and the visualization production cycle has started to feel more familiar each time. Read More

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Midterm shifts versus the 2016 election

The Guardian goes with scaled, angled arrows to show the Republican and Democrat swings in these midterms for the House compared against those of 2016. It reminds me of the classic wind-like map by The New York Times from 2012, but the angles seem to give the differences a bit more room to breathe. Tags: difference, election, Guardian

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How a meme grew into a campaign slogan

A meme that cried “jobs not mobs” began modestly, but a couple of weeks later it found its way into a slogan used by the President of the United States. Keith Collins and Kevin Roose for The New York Times traced the spread of the meme through social media using a beeswarm chart. Blue represents activity on Twitter, yellow represents Facebook, and orange represents Reddit. Circles are sized by retweets,...

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Demographic effects on voting intention

The Economist built an election model that treats demographic variables like blocks that output a probability of voting Republican or Democrat: Our model adds up the impact of each variable, like a set of building blocks. As a result, a group of weak predictors that point in the same direction can cancel out a single strong one. In theory, the model could identify a black voter as a Republican leaner,...

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Maps of the issues mentioned most in election advertising

As the midterm elections loom, the ads focusing on key issues are running in full force. Using data from Nielsen, Bloomberg mapped the issues talked about across the country. Bloomberg News analyzed more than 3 million election ads for 2018 congressional and gubernatorial races to get a sense of the most commonly discussed issue in 210 local television markets, as defined by the Nielsen Company. Across the U.S., 16 different...

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Faces of diverse midterms

As one might expect, many women, people of color, and L.G.B.T. candidates are running in this year’s midterms. It’ll be one of the most diverse elections in U.S. history. The New York Times provides a scrolly breakdown with 410 cutout faces floating around on your screen. Tags: diversity, election

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xkcd maps 2018 midterm election challengers

Randall Munroe, Kelsey Harris, and Max Goodman for xkcd mapped all the challengers for the the upcoming midterm elections. Names are colored by political party. They are sized by the level of office a candidate is running for and the chances of success. (I’m not totally sure how that scale works though.) Interact with the map to focus on regions, and click on names, which directs you to the candidate’s...

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Geography of voter turnout

Based on data from Dave Leip’s Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections, The Washington Post mapped voter turnout on a diverging color scale. Orange represents lower than average turnout in 2016 and purple represents higher than average. Not to diminish the meaning of the map, but the most shocking part might be the placement of Hawaii. Tags: election, voting, Washington Post

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High school statistics class builds election prediction model

High school seniors, in the Political Statistics class at Montgomery Blair High School in Silver Spring, Maryland, built a prediction model for the upcoming elections: Under the guidance of Mr. David Stein, this model (which we named the Overall Results of an Analytical Consideration of the Looming Elections a.k.a. ORACLE of Blair) was developed by a group of around 70 high school seniors, working diligently since the start of September....

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2018 House forecast from FiveThirtyEight

Ever since the huge forecasting upset in 2016, I’ve tended to stay away from that stuff. I mean, it was painful to watch the Golden State Warriors, a huge favorite to win the championship basically the whole series, lose to the Cleveland Cavaliers. Yeah. The Warriors. What were you thinking of? Alas, it is 2018, and FiveThirtyEight has their forecast for who will control the House. Mainly, I post for...

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