election

2 posts
Bloomberg ad spending, relative to other candidates’

Mike Bloomberg’s ad spending might not be that much relative to his own net worth, but compared to other candidates’ spending, it’s a whole lot of money. The Washington Post puts the spending into perspective with a long scroller. Each rectangle represents $100k, and there are “mile markers” along the way to keep you anchored on the scale. Tags: ads, Bloomberg, election, spending, Washington Post

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Bloomberg ad spending, relative to other candidates’

Mike Bloomberg’s ad spending might not be that much relative to his own net worth, but compared to other candidates’ spending, it’s a whole lot of money. The Washington Post puts the spending into perspective with a long scroller. Each rectangle represents $100k, and there are “mile markers” along the way to keep you anchored on the scale. Tags: ads, Bloomberg, election, spending, Washington Post

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Presidential Hopefuls screensaver bounces heads around based on polling data

I know you don’t get enough election coverage these days and are probably like, “I wish there was a way I could be reminded of who’s running with bouncing heads across my screen whenever I come back to my computer. That would be super.” Well, look no more. The Presidential Hopefuls screensaver by Robert Tolar Haining is what you’re looking for. Tags: election, screensaver

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Quiz to see which Democratic candidate agrees with you most

The Washington Post asked Democratic candidates a series of policy questions. To see which one agrees with you most, the Post made a quiz: Now, it’s your turn to answer. Below are 20 questions we found particularly interesting, mostly because they reveal big differences between the remaining major candidates. We haven’t asked the campaigns about every topic, but this selection tries to cover a variety of issues. Answer as many...

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Fixing the ‘impeach this’ map with a transition to a cartogram

As discussed previously, the “impeach this” map has some issues. Mainly, it equates land area to votes, which makes for a lot of visual attention to counties that are big even though not many people live in them. So, Karim Douïeb used a clever transition to change the bivariate map to a cartogram. Now you can have a dual view. Tags: election, impeachment

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The ‘impeach this’ map has some issues

Philip Bump explains why the “impeach this” map is a bit dubious: By now, this criticism of electoral maps is taught in elementary schools. Or, at least, it should be. Those red counties in Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wyoming, for example, are home to 1.6 million 2016 voters — fewer than half of the number of voters in Los Angeles County. Trump won 1 million votes in those...

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Democratic candidates who Iowa fairgoers could name

In a “radically unscientific survey” Kevin Uhrmacher and Kevin Schaul for The Washington Post asked 59 Iowa State Fair attendees if they could name Democratic candidates. Participants circled the ones they knew. Above are the results in aggregate. I’m less interested in the results since I’m not so sure about the small sample, but the visual is fun. The scribble scrabble look is representative of the fuzzy dataset, and I...

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Mapping politically polarized cities

Rachael Dottle, for FiveThirtyEight, looked for political differences in cities and ranked them, based on precinct voting margins for the 2016 election: To see just how politically segregated America’s urban areas are, we used each city’s 2016 election results to calculate its dissimilarity index — basically, a number that tells us how separated its Republicans and Democrats are from one another, with higher numbers indicating more segregation. This technique is...

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More candidates and earlier

For Bloomberg, Lauren Leatherby and Paul Murray describe the heightened eagerness to enter the race for United States president. The stacked timelines, looking like squished bunches of Twizzlers, shows when people entered and withdrew during past election seasons. We’re 536 days out and 23 Democrats are in. In contrast, there were 8 around this time in 2008. Tags: Bloomberg, election

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Color distribution in campaign logos

In news graphics, blue typically represents Democrat and red represents Republican. However, the definition isn’t so clear-cut by actual party usage. Chris Alcantara for The Washington Post broke it down in 900 campaign logos used during the recent midterms. Each strip represents a logo. Tags: color, election, Washington Post

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