immigration

11 posts
Immigration in the United States visualized as rings of tree trunk

Pedro M. Cruz, John Wihbey, Avni Ghael and Felipe Shibuya from Northeastern University used a tree metaphor to represent a couple centuries of immigration in the United States: Like countries, trees can be hundreds, even thousands, of years old. Cells grow slowly, and the pattern of growth influences the shape of the trunk. Just as these cells leave an informational mark in the tree, so too do incoming immigrants contribute...

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Go Back Where You Came From

For a second, let's imagine that everyone with a immigrants in their family tree left the country. Read More

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Citizenship question returning to Census

Emily Baumgaertner reporting for The New York Times: But critics of the change and experts in the Census Bureau itself have said that, amid a fiery immigration debate, the inclusion of a citizenship question could prompt immigrants who are in the country illegally not to respond. That would result in a severe undercount of the population — and, in turn, faulty data for government agencies and outside groups that rely...

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Boost economy with immigration

Want to increase the GDP? Easy. Let more immigrants in. Lena Groeger for ProPublica: In an analysis for ProPublica, Adam Ozimek and Mark Zandi at Moody’s Analytics, an independent economics firm, estimated that for every 1 percent increase in U.S. population made of immigrants, GDP rises 1.15 percent. So a simple way to get to Trump’s 4 percent GDP bump? Take in about 8 million net immigrants per year. To...

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Visa restrictions and possible impact on innovation

The Washington Post talked to three experts on the American workforce and innovation and how immigration restrictions to the US might impact future progress. Aside from the important topic the ratio of words to charts is interesting. I’ve gotten used to seeing pieces that are chart-heavy or word-heavy, but this is more one-to-one. I like it. Tags: immigration, Washington Post

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Demographics for immigrants from banned countries

As I’m sure you know, the current administration banned immigrants from seven countries recently. The New York Times looks at immigrants from these countries who already settled in the United States — their education, salaries, and where they live. Tags: ban, demographics, immigration

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Charting U.K. Immigration by Country

Outsiders, like me, who are trying to understand how much immigration is driving the “Brexit” debate about the European Union might consider this fact: Britons are much more likely today to encounter people born in another country — both inside and outside Europe — than they were a decade ago. In 2014, about 1 in 8 people residents were born outside the U.K. — up from about 1 in 11 a...

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South Korea’s Foreigners, Over Time

Note: I followed my wife, a foreign correspondent for NPR News, to Seoul last year. This is one of a series of posts exploring our adopted country’s demographics, politics and other nerdy data stuff. Let me know if you have ideas for future posts. Yesterday we looked a the most-recent data on foreign residents in South Korea, breaking down their home countries and new locations. But how has this changed...

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Where are South Korea’s Foreigners From?

Separating foreigners from the locals at a recent street festival celebrating Buddha’s birthday. I had to move across the globe, but I’ve finally cracked The One Percent. Not in wealth, of course. But I am one of about 24,000 civilian Americans living in South Korea, population 50.2 million. So that means I’m quite seriously in the minority. In my central Seoul district, for example, there are about 1,500 registered* Americans**...

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Immigration history

American immigration history is chock full of policies and restrictions, and you can see the effects in the distribution of immigrants into this country over the years. Alvin Chang for Vox steps you through the major policy shifts since 1820. The graphic above shows how these policies affect who enters the country. It shows 200 years of legal immigration into the United States — and how different policies and international...

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