infographics

8 posts
Modern reproduction of an 1868 catalog of flower illustrations

Nicholas Rougeux, who has a knack and the patience to recreate vintage works in a modern context, reproduced Elizabeth Twining’s Illustrations of the Natural Orders of Plants: If someone told me when I was young that I would spend three months of my time tracing nineteenth century botanical illustrations and enjoy it, I would have scoffed, but that’s what I did to reproduce Elizabeth Twining’s Illustrations of the Natural Orders...

0 0
Data-driven hipster reading list

When it comes to reading lists, we usually look for what’s popular, because if a lot of people read something, then there must be something good about it. Russell Goldenberg and Amber Thomas for The Pudding took it the other direction. Using checkout data from the Seattle Public Library, they looked for books that haven’t been checked out in decades. Also: How cool is it that there’s an API to...

0 0
Atlas of all the moons in our solar system

National Geographic went all out on their atlas of moons. Space. Orbits. Rotating and interactive objects in the sky. Ooo. You’ll want to bookmark this one for later, so you can spend time with it. Tags: moon, National Geographic, space

0 0
Cost of a Census undercount

The citizenship question for the upcoming Census is still stuck in limbo. One of the arguments against the question is that it could lead to a significant undercount in population, which can lead to less funding. For Reuters, Ally J. Levine and Ashlyn Still show how this might happen with a highlight on federal programs that rely on population estimates. Tags: census, Reuters, undercount

0 0
Guide to manipulated video

I have a feeling we’re in for a lot of manipulated videos as we get closer to the election. The Washington Post provides a guide for the different types. I hope they keep building on this with a guide on how to spot the fakes, but as they say, knowing is half the battle. Tags: fake, video, Washington Post

0 0
The Periodic Table, a challenge in information organization

Reader Chris P. points me to this article about the design of the Periodic Table. I then learned that 2019 is the “International Year of the Periodic Table,” according to the United Nations. Here is the canonical design of the Periodic Table that science students are familiar with. (Source: Wikipedia.) The Periodic Table is an exercise of information organization and display. It's about adding structure to over 100 elements, so...

0 0
Scale of the Hong Kong protest

You know those sped up videos where there’s a long line for something and someone walks the length of it? The New York Times did the scrolly equivalent for the recent Hong Kong protest, using snaps from aerial video and stringing them together geographically. A lot of people showed up. Tags: Hong Kong, New York Times, photography, protest

0 0
Mapping Bob Ross

Fathom Information Design recently made tools to find patterns in documents of text. They applied their tools to Bob Ross: Using custom tools we’ve built to understand large document sets, we analyzed the transcripts of all 403 episodes of Bob Ross’ “The Joy of Painting” to see how his famous phrases evolved over 31 seasons. That analysis, which you can read in detail, revealed the clusters shown here, which are...

0 0
Jeopardy! winners making chart jokes

James Holzhauer is on a record-breaking Jeopardy! win streak. It’s not so much for the number of wins in a row — an impressive 30 so far — but for how much he wins per game. He’s on pace to break current record-holder Ken Jennings’ total winnings of $2.5 million in less than half the number of games. Chicago Tribune made this chart to show Holzhauer’s cumulative sum: Holzhauer commented:...

0 0
Why some Asian accents swap Ls and Rs

Vox delves into why Ls and Rs often get replaced by Asian speakers using English as a second language. Some sounds aren’t prevalent in other languages, and it’s not the same across all Asian languages. Tags: Asian, language, Vox

0 0