infographics

1 posts
Paying for Elizabeth Warren’s proposed policies

Elizabeth Warren has big plans, and they would cost a lot with a big shift in government spending. The New York Times breaks it down. I realize the topic here is important, but NYT’s bubble game is on point in this piece. Check out those transitions as the bubbles funnel into the screen from the top and how the pie-like segments rotate as each segment is highlighted. Force-directed graphs, for...

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Scale of space browser

I always enjoy me some scale of space graphics. Neal Agarwal made an interactive browser that starts at astronaut scale and quickly zooms you out to larger objects with a fisheye view. See also: if the moon were a pixel, planets from various perspectives, a scaled physical model of the solar system, and the really slow speed of light. Tags: scale, space

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Visualizing the Friends sitcom

Marion Rouayroux, a graphic designer and a big fan of the show Friends, collated a bunch of data about the sitcom. Then she visualized the data with a series of information graphics. Tags: Friends, television

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Diverging line plot as the perfect comic

This is perfect. Willikin Wolf made characters out of two dots moving along their paths of productivity and wages. Something’s wrong pic.twitter.com/tMhNPk85pH — Willikin Wolf (@WillikinWolf) September 23, 2019 More data+comics, please. Tags: comic, Willikin Wolf

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School diversity visualized with moving bubbles

The Washington Post visualized 13,000 school districts to show the change in diversity between 1995 and 2017. Each bubble represents a district and the size represents number of students. The bubbles transition to diverse, undiverse, and extremely undiverse. It’s an important topic and worth the read. But right now, all I can think about is that I need to up my moving bubble game. Tags: diversity, school, Washington Post

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Stacking Apple apps in the App Store

For The New York Times, Jack Nicas and Keith Collins stack up app rankings in the App Store. Apple’s apps appear to find their way to the top of searches, perhaps more often than you might expect. I like how the graphics navigate through the stacked bars. It starts with a realistic view of scrolling through apps on an iPhone, and then zooms out on each section until you’re looking...

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A sim to show self-driving car challenges

On the surface, driving a car might seem fairly straightforward. Follow the rules of the road, don’t crash, and watch out for others. So why not just let a computer do all of the work? The Washington Post provides an interactive simulator to put you in the passenger seat and see for yourself. Tags: game, self-driving, simulation, Washington Post

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Plastic bottles purchased in a day, Eiffel Tower for scale

Millions of plastic bottles are purchased every day around the world. What does that look like? Simon Scarr and Marco Hernandez for Reuters virtually piled the estimated number of bottles purchased in an hour, day, month, and up to the past 10 years. They used the Eiffel Tower for scale. The above is just one day’s worth. Tags: plastic, Reuters, scale

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History of slavery in America

USA Today looks at some of the numbers on 17th century slavery in America. The format, with zooms in and out and shifts to different views, focuses both on scale and the individuals. Tags: slavery, USA Today

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How much warmer your city will get

BBC News asks a straightforward question: How much warmer is your city? Enter your country and then your city. You get a time series along with projections. It reminds me of The New York Times piece from a few years ago, but the BBC one uses more recent data and covers major cities worldwide. Tags: BBC, global warming

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