infographics

1 posts
Cow representation in the Senate

For the Absurd America section of The Washington Post, Sergio Peçanha asks the question that’s on everyone’s mind: Are cows better represented in the Senate than people? Tags: cows, Senate, Sergio Peçanha, Washington Post

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Quiz to see which Democratic candidate agrees with you most

The Washington Post asked Democratic candidates a series of policy questions. To see which one agrees with you most, the Post made a quiz: Now, it’s your turn to answer. Below are 20 questions we found particularly interesting, mostly because they reveal big differences between the remaining major candidates. We haven’t asked the campaigns about every topic, but this selection tries to cover a variety of issues. Answer as many...

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Scale of Australia bushfires shown with unit charts

Outside of Australia, it can be a challenge to get a grasp of how bad the bushfires actually are. There have been some attempts that overlay a map of Australia over various locations, but they’ve varied in accuracy. This scrolling unit chart by Reuters Graphics makes the comparison more concrete. Each square represents a square kilometer, a counter at the top ticks up as you scroll, and geographic points of...

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Visual guide for the fires in Australia

For The Guardian, Niko Kommenda and Josh Holder provide a visual guide to the bushfires in Australia: Satellite data from Nasa showed a stark increase in the number of fire detections in November and December compared with previous years. Satellites detect fire “hotspots” by measuring the infrared radiation emitted by the blazes. In previous years, between 2,000 and 3,000 such hotspots were recorded each December in the south-east, while in...

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Weight gain lines

From Kim Warp for The New Yorker. Ha. Ha. It’s funny because it’s true. It reminds me of Amanda Cox’s dress size graphic for the NYT. [Thanks, Mike] Tags: humor, New Yorker, weight

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Timelines to make you feel old

One of the best ways to feel old is to look to your past and realize how long ago it was. Wait Buy Why demonstrates with a bunch of timeline splits. For example: “Remember when Jurassic Park, The Lion King, and Forrest Gump came out in theaters? Closer to the moon landing than today. I feel like there was an xkcd comic about this, but the closest I could find...

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How online school ratings are flawed

Standardized ratings are a challenge, because they often try to encapsulate many variables into a single variable. On the upside, a single score is quick and easy to see, but on the downside, variance goes into hiding and people/things that don’t fit a defined standard get dinged. Vox looks at these challenges in the context of online school ratings. Tags: ratings, school, Vox

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Everything in the universe

In this video, Dominic Walliman attempts to illustrate and explain all of the known things in the universe. There’s also a poster version. Tags: Dominic Walliman, space

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Scroll, scroll, scroll through the depths of the ocean

The oceans are deep. But how deep and what’s down there? Neal Agarwal provides this piece, The Deep Sea, that scales the depths of the ocean to your browser window. Scroll, scroll, and then scroll some more to see what sea life (and other things) reside at various depths. Agarwal’s Size of Space piece from last month explores the size of space in a similar vein. It’s equally fun. This...

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Compare your city’s air pollution to the rest of the world

High air pollution can lead to serious health risks, but you can’t usually see particulate matter floating in the air around you. So we have no base for comparison and only an abstract sense of what’s bad and okay. The New York Times tries to make the pollution more visible. They lead with moving particles across your screen at a density that matches approximately to what the Environmental Protection Agency...

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