infographics

6 posts
School diversity visualized with moving bubbles

The Washington Post visualized 13,000 school districts to show the change in diversity between 1995 and 2017. Each bubble represents a district and the size represents number of students. The bubbles transition to diverse, undiverse, and extremely undiverse. It’s an important topic and worth the read. But right now, all I can think about is that I need to up my moving bubble game. Tags: diversity, school, Washington Post

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Stacking Apple apps in the App Store

For The New York Times, Jack Nicas and Keith Collins stack up app rankings in the App Store. Apple’s apps appear to find their way to the top of searches, perhaps more often than you might expect. I like how the graphics navigate through the stacked bars. It starts with a realistic view of scrolling through apps on an iPhone, and then zooms out on each section until you’re looking...

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A sim to show self-driving car challenges

On the surface, driving a car might seem fairly straightforward. Follow the rules of the road, don’t crash, and watch out for others. So why not just let a computer do all of the work? The Washington Post provides an interactive simulator to put you in the passenger seat and see for yourself. Tags: game, self-driving, simulation, Washington Post

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Plastic bottles purchased in a day, Eiffel Tower for scale

Millions of plastic bottles are purchased every day around the world. What does that look like? Simon Scarr and Marco Hernandez for Reuters virtually piled the estimated number of bottles purchased in an hour, day, month, and up to the past 10 years. They used the Eiffel Tower for scale. The above is just one day’s worth. Tags: plastic, Reuters, scale

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History of slavery in America

USA Today looks at some of the numbers on 17th century slavery in America. The format, with zooms in and out and shifts to different views, focuses both on scale and the individuals. Tags: slavery, USA Today

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How much warmer your city will get

BBC News asks a straightforward question: How much warmer is your city? Enter your country and then your city. You get a time series along with projections. It reminds me of The New York Times piece from a few years ago, but the BBC one uses more recent data and covers major cities worldwide. Tags: BBC, global warming

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Democratic candidates who Iowa fairgoers could name

In a “radically unscientific survey” Kevin Uhrmacher and Kevin Schaul for The Washington Post asked 59 Iowa State Fair attendees if they could name Democratic candidates. Participants circled the ones they knew. Above are the results in aggregate. I’m less interested in the results since I’m not so sure about the small sample, but the visual is fun. The scribble scrabble look is representative of the fuzzy dataset, and I...

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Measuring pop music’s falsetto usage

Vox and Matt Daniels delved into falsetto in pop music over the years. Is falsetto a big trend now compared to the rest of the history? The process of finding the answer, noisy data and all, was just as interesting as the answer itself. Tags: falsetto, Matt Daniels, music, Vox

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Predicting whether you are Democrat or Republican

The New York Times is in a quizzy mood lately. Must be all the hot weather. Sahil Chinoy shows how certain demographics tend towards Democrat or Republican, with a hook that that lets you put in your own information. A decision tree updates as you go. Reminds of the Amanda Cox decision tree classic from 2008. Tags: decision tree, Democrat, demographics, quiz, Republican, voting

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Everyday charts book

Add a book to the humorous-charts-documenting-the-everyday genre. Am I Overthinking This? by Michelle Rial charts the everyday. I like how Rial uses everyday objects to show everyday data informally. [Amazon link] Tags: book, humor

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