infographics

435 posts
A view from the Moon’s south pole

NASA Goddard visualized the point of view from the south pole of the Moon, based on years of data collection to map the Moon’s surface. The result is a data-based time-lapse that shows Earth moving up and down and long shadows because the run shines at a low angle. It’s a neat contrast to what we see from Earth and makes me wonder what other points of view there are....

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How the 3-point line changed basketball

Vox shows how the 3-point line is “breaking” the game. The basic math says a 3-point shot is more efficient for scoring points than a 2-point shot if the team can make a high enough percentage of attempts. It’s why the mid-range shot has fallen out of favor. But it’s more an evolution than a breaking. Defense adapts, and then offense adjusts to that, etc. Stephen Curry making double-digit threes...

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Comparing abortion limits in the U.S. against other countries

The Washington Post, in an effort that I’m sure took more energy and time than it looks, compared U.S. abortion laws against those in other countries: In the last three decades, countries around the world have made it easier to legally get an abortion. In some parts of the United States, however, it’s gotten harder. Just this month, Mexico’s supreme court ruled to decriminalize the practice. Argentina’s Senate legalized abortion...

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Visual guide for protecting your home from wildfire

Aaron Steckelberg and Tik Root for The Washington Post provide a visual guide on how to protect your home from wildfire. It starts with an ember floating carefree in the air, and then the tour highlights actions you can take. Can’t wait for the guides on how to protect your home from flooding and/or how to dress for extreme temperatures. Tags: 3-d, Washington Post, wildfire

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This is a good Venn diagram.

[via] Tags: humor

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Sand mining viewed from above

Poyang Lake is China’s largest freshwater lake, but sand mining has changed its depth and structure, which messes up the ecosystem. Simon Scarr and Manas Sharma for Reuters used satellite imagery to show the scale and disruption of the mining activities. The ships look like little bugs slowly eating away at the coastline. Tags: mining, Poyang Lake, Reuters, satellite imagery

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Humorous charts to organize thoughts

When I’m feeling confused about what’s going on around me, I gravitate towards making charts, so Michelle Rial’s book of charts, Maybe This Will Help: How to Feel Better When Things Stay the Same, resonates. It’s available for pre-order. Tags: book, humor, Michelle Rial

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Beautiful News, a book charting the good things in the world

From David McCandless and team, who you might know from such books as Information is Beautiful and Knowledge is Beautiful has a new book on Beautiful News: Inspired by our ongoing Beautiful News project, the book surfaces and visualises the amazing, beautiful, positive things *still* happening in the world. Things we can’t always see because we’re fixated on the negativity of the news. As per our previous books, this one...

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Black mortality gap

Anna Flagg, for NYT’s The Upshot, used dots arranged as a stacked area chart to show the difference between two mortality rates. Each dot represents 10 people, and they start as a random cloud. A transition to show rate by age lends focus to both an absolute and relative count. Tags: Anna Flagg, mortality, race, Upshot

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Bitcoin power usage

You might have heard that Bitcoin uses a lot of electricity. More than some countries. You might have wondered how that could be possible. The New York Times explains with a set of graphics and illustrations. Tags: Bitcoin, electricity, New York Times

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