infographics

208 posts
Inflated counts for cleared rape cases

Newsy, Reveal and ProPublica look into rape cases in the U.S. and law enforcement’s use of exceptional clearance. The designation allows police to clear cases when they have enough evidence to make an arrest and know who and where the suspect is, but can’t make an arrest for reasons outside their control. Experts say it’s supposed to be used sparingly. Culled data from various police departments shows the designation is...

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How a meme grew into a campaign slogan

A meme that cried “jobs not mobs” began modestly, but a couple of weeks later it found its way into a slogan used by the President of the United States. Keith Collins and Kevin Roose for The New York Times traced the spread of the meme through social media using a beeswarm chart. Blue represents activity on Twitter, yellow represents Facebook, and orange represents Reddit. Circles are sized by retweets,...

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Faces of diverse midterms

As one might expect, many women, people of color, and L.G.B.T. candidates are running in this year’s midterms. It’ll be one of the most diverse elections in U.S. history. The New York Times provides a scrolly breakdown with 410 cutout faces floating around on your screen. Tags: diversity, election

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Bugs that live on you in AR

I really like what The New York Times has been doing with augmented reality lately. What usually feels gimmicky is used as a tool to provide scale and detail and to invite closer observation. In their most recent, the Times got in the Halloween spirit and showed the “monsters that live on you.” You can view it in the browser, but it doesn’t quite compare to seeing a human-sized cockroach...

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Interactive comic to remember things better

In a time we commit less to memory and rely more on technology supplements, Nicky Case provides an interactive comic to teach the science of spaced repetition, which can be used to “remember anything forever-ish.” My memory is horrible, and it only gets worse with time. I needed this. Tags: memory, Nicky Case

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Visualizing science

Jen Christiansen spoke about her extensive experience as a graphics editor for Scientific American. Her talk notes span a wide range of topics from the “rules”, the spectrum of visualization, and collaboration: [S]ome of my favorite recent Scientific American graphics are the result of bringing together different artists—plucking experts from each of those groups and matching them up to create a final image that draws upon all of their strengths,...

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The French takes back cinema but can you see it?

I like independent cinema, and here are three French films that come to mind as I write this post: Delicatessen, The Class (Entre les murs), and 8 Women (8 femmes).  The French people are taking back cinema. Even though they purchased more tickets to U.S. movies than French movies, the gap has been narrowing in the last two decades. How do I know? It's the subject of this infographic:  How do I...

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The French takes back cinema but can you see it?

Kaiser Fung (JunkCharts, Principal Analytics Prep) finds a visual design that highlights the insights from data comparing ticket sales of U.S. movies versus French movies in France.

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News homepage design overview

As you click through the news, you can probably almost always figure out what source is loading without the URL or title. Just judge based on the layout. Noah Veltman made this overview to show how news orgs prioritize editorial content, ads, and sponsored content. Tags: homepage, news, Noah Veltman

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Timeline of Earth

Here’s a fun piece by Andy Bergmann that shows the timeline of Earth. It’s a long-ish, straightforward scroller that vertically spaces significant events during the history of the planet. You start with the formation of Earth 4.6 billion years ago and work your way up to present day. Tags: Earth, timeline

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