infographics

60 posts
Voting guide for your state

The Washington Post provides another straightforward voting guide, based on where you live and how you plan to vote. Election season is always interesting graphics-wise, because all of the news outlets are starting with the same data and information. But they all show the data a little differently, asking various questions or using different visual approaches. Things are just getting started, but contrast this Post piece with FiveThirtyEight’s voting guide....

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Math behind wearing masks

The math behind wearing a mask can seem unintuitive at times. Minute Physics and Aatish Bhatia break it down in this illustrated video to show why wearing masks works: The premise is that there’s a two-way effect with breathing in and breathing out. There are some assumptions here, but there’s an interactive component that lets you adjust the variables. They’ve also made the code available. Tags: Aatish Bhatia, coronavirus, mask,...

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Choose your own election outcome

The election is full of what-ifs, and the result changes depending on which direction they take. Josh Holder and Alexander Burns for The New York Times use a pair of circular Voronoi diagrams and draggable bubbles so that you can test the what-ifs. Contrast this with NYT’s 2012 graphic showing all possible paths. While the 2012 graphic shows you the big picture, the 2020 interactive places more weight on individual...

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How to vote in each state

Each state is handling mail-in voting in a certain way with varying timelines and rules. FiveThirtyEight provides a straightforward state-by-state guide so you can see what your state is doing. I like the color-coded grid map doubling as quick navigation. You get the overview and a jump to the state of interest. Tags: election, FiveThirtyEight, voting

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Minutes spoken at the Republican Convention

The New York Times provides a breakdown of minutes spoken at the Republican National Convention. The bubbles, sized by minute count, start as an overview of everyone who spoke, and then cluster into specific groups as you scroll. Tags: convention, New York Times, Republican, talking

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A testing mess: one chart, four numbers, four colors, three titles, wrong units, wrong data

Twitterstan wanted to vote the following infographic off the island: (The publisher's website is here but I can't find a direct link to this graphic.) The mishap is particularly galling given the controversy swirling around this year's A-Level results in the U.K. For U.S. readers, you can think of A-Levels as SAT Subject Tests, which in the U.K. are required of all university applicants, and represent the most important, if...

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Scale of the explosion in Beirut

There was an explosion in Beirut. It was big. How big? Marco Hernandez and Simon Scarr for Reuters provide a sense of scale: George William Herbert, an adjunct professor at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies Center for Nonproliferation Studies and a missile and effects consultant, used two methods to estimate the yield of the explosion. One used visual evidence of the blast itself along with damage assessments. The other...

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Data-information-conspiracy

Seems about right. (Who made it?) Tags: conspiracy, humor

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Ask how you can give

A reader and colleague was frustrated with the following graphic that appeared in the otherwise commendable article in National Geographic (link). The NatGeo article provides a history lesson on past pandemics that killed millions. What does the design want to convey to readers? Our attention is drawn to the larger objects, the red triangle on the left or the green triangle on the right. Regarding the red triangle, we learn...

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How air spreads on a subway train

If someone sneezes in a closed space, you hope that the area has good ventilation, because those sneeze particles are going to spread. The New York Times explains in the context of a subway train. Wear a mask. Tags: coronavirus, mask, New York Times, simulation, subway

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