infographics

83 posts
Comparing the coronavirus to past deadly events

One way to estimate the impact of the coronavirus is to compare it against expected mortality. People are still dying of other causes. The virus has increased the total counts around the world. The New York Times compared these increases against other deadly events: Only the worst disasters completely upend normal patterns of death, overshadowing, if only briefly, everyday causes like cancer, heart disease and car accidents. Here’s how the...

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Why time feels weird right now

For Reuters, Feilding Cage provides a series of interactive tidbits to demonstrate why time perception feels like a mess these days. Various factors skew our perception different directions. On emotion: A busy day usually goes by quickly, but for some the opposite is true in 2020. Frontline healthcare workers, for example, know they are at high risk of exposure to the coronavirus, and the resulting anxiety heightens their attentiveness and...

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Who is responsible for climate change?

Kurzgesagt, in collaboration with Our World in Data, tackle the question of who is responsible for climate change and who should fix it. As you might imagine, the answer is not always straightforward. Tags: climate change, Kurzgesagt

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Vaccine tracker

As we know, it typically takes years to develop a vaccine that is approved for wide scale use. For the coronavirus, researchers are trying to speed up that timeline. Jonathan Corum and Carl Zimmer for The New York Times have started a vaccine tracker to keep watch. They’ve categorized the vaccines by phase and those that are part of Operation Warp Speed. (Earmarked for later: a closer look at government...

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Challenges of reopening the meatpacking plant

To reopen safely, meatpacking plants have to take precautions to provide space and separation for workers. But the process typically involves a lot of people working close together. The New York Times illustrates the process and the challenges moving forward. Tags: coronavirus, meatpacking, New York Times, reopening

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Pen plotter used as storytelling device

Pen plotters slowly draw out a picture line-by-line, so when you watch a chart plot out, it shows up on the paper one piece at a time. Silfa Huttner and Duncan Geere’s use this unraveling “feature” in Plottervision. In the video above, they describe fluctuating oil prices. Pen plotters are all the rage these days. I think it must be some combination of pressure and time. That’s all it takes...

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A comic on spotting misinformation

There’s a lot of misinformation passing through the internets right now. A lot. Connie Jin, for NPR, made a comic that explains how to spot it. I suspect FD readers are better than average at staying skeptical, but maybe pass this along to the family members who aren’t so good and picking out what is real and not. Tags: comic, Connie Jin, coronavirus, misinformation, NPR

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54 ways coronavirus changed the world

The coronavirus has changed everything. Larry Buchanan, for The New York Times, goes minimalist with a series of up and down arrows to show which direction things moved. Even though there’s no magnitude or axes, it still works. In some ways, the simplistic view is more effective than regular charts. Tags: coronavirus, Larry Buchanan, New York Times

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An Incalculable Loss

The New York Times used their full front page to list 1,000 names of the 100,000 who died due to the virus. There is an online version, which is equally moving. Tags: coronavirus, deaths, New York Times

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They Were Us.

This is The New York Times front page for Sunday, May 24, 2020. Tags: coronavirus, front page, New York Times

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