infographics

493 posts
Active shooter endings

For The New York Times, Larry Buchanan and Lauren Leatherby used Sankey diagrams to show the endings from active shootings in the United States: Most attacks captured in the data were already over before law enforcement arrived. People at the scene did intervene, sometimes shooting the attackers, but typically physically subduing them. But in about half of all cases, the attackers commited suicide or simply stopped shooting and fled. Tags:...

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Diagram of watercolors from the 17th century

In 1692, artist A. Boogert published a guide to watercolors, showing the thousands of possibilities of mixing 31 shades. Nicholas Rougeux, as per his specialty, modernized the work into an interactive diagram. Tags: color, Nicholas Rougeux

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A German obstacle course

A twitter user sent me this chart from Germany. It came with a translation: "Explanation: The chart says how many car drivers plan to purchase a new state-sponsored ticket for public transport. And of those who do, how many plan to use their car less often." Because visual language should be universal, we shouldn't be deterred by not knowing German. The structure of the data can be readily understood: we...

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Garbage in space

There are thousands of satellites that orbit Earth, with about half of them launched in the past three years. Financial Times shows why that’s a problem in a scrolling piece through space debris: In 1978, Nasa astrophysicist Donald J Kessler outlined a theory of what would happen if space traffic continues to grow and collisions occur. The debris created by those collisions would skitter off into the paths of other...

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Calculating the new cost of your summer road trip

With gas prices a lot higher than usual, JĂșlia Ledur, Leslie Shapiro, and N. Kirkpatrick, for The Washington Post, provide a calculator to see how much more your road trip will cost in the United States. Just put in your starting point, destination, and the type of car you drive. Going the other direction, they also show how far you could go today on a 2019 budget with a handful...

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Examination of songs after virality on TikTok

Vox, in collaboration with The Pudding, looked at what happens when a song goes viral on TikTok. It heads down the TikTok-to-Spotify pipeline, which signals money to be made and draws labels to take advantage. Tags: music, Pudding, TikTok, viral, Vox

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Election modeling explained

In election reporting, there’s a gap between real-time results and final results, so news orgs use statistical models to show where results appear to be headed. For The Washington Post, Adrian Blanco and Artur Galocha explain the basic concepts behind their model, using a fictional state called Voteland. Tags: election, modeling, Washington Post

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Final texts

Alicia P.Q. Wittmeyer, for NYT Opinion, approached the one-million mark for Covid deaths with text messages. The piece starts on February 29, 2020, when the first person died because of Covid. The count to 1 million begins, and a recurring ticker reminds you of the increase over time. Thirteen text message threads between someone who died and a person who cared remind you that the numbers are real. Tags: coronavirus,...

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Lives cut short by Covid

Alyssa Fowers and Leslie Shapiro, for The Washington Post, used the stories of 114 individuals to show weekly Covid deaths. Each story is “cut short”, making the length of each fragment match counts for the corresponding week. My brain was slightly confused by the metaphor at first. The lower the count, the more an individual’s story is cut short, but my intuition expected that more deaths would mean stories were...

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Nuclear winter explained visually

Neil Halloran, known for his documentary films that lean strongly on data visualization, collaborated with RAND to explain the possibility (or lack) of a nuclear winter. In the last third of the film, Halloran also discusses the pursuit of absolute truth and whether it’s truly worth it in the end. Lots to think about. Tags: Neil Halloran, nuclear, RAND

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