Korea

2 posts
Which Countries Sent the Most Athletes to Pyeongchang?

Because I live in Seoul and work as a journalist, I’m paying close attention to the Winter Olympics as they open tonight in Pyeongchang, South Korea. I don’t know much about the Winter Games’ history, so I decided first to research which countries are here. Europe dominates: Here’s a world map (Russia has many athletes here, but they’re not eligible for medals because of a doping scheme): And a table,...

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Common Ground Between North and South Korea: Aging and Shrinking Populations

The birth rate in South Korea, where I live and work, hit a record low this year, leading to concern about the impact an aging (and, eventually, shrinking) population might have on the nation’s society and economy. These charts show the long-term trends, both in actual population and projected changes, according to United Nations data. I’ve added North Korea, which actually has a higher fertility rate today, for context. First,...

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Mapping South Korea’s Total and Foreign Populations — by Municipal District

South Korea, my adopted home for almost two years, has about 50 million residents as of the last census, in 2015. Most of them are settled in the country’s urban areas. About 22 million residents, for example, live in Seoul, the capital in the country’s northwest corner, and its adjacent province, Gyeonggi. As an experiment to create a choropleth map with D3 and NPR’s dailygraphics rig, which drives most of...

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Visualizing World Alcohol Consumption: What Beverages to Countries Prefer?

I posted recently about how countries consume

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Charting World Alcohol Consumption: How Much Does Each Country Drink?

A few weeks ago I posted about gender gaps in alcohol consumption around the world. In some countries — South Korea, for example — men and women consume quite different amounts of booze, according to the World Health Organization. Fueled by a love for sojo, South Korea’s men are among the heaviest drinkers in the world, consuming about 78 grams per day — nearly twice as much as other men on average....

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South Korea’s (Residential) Rise: How Building Heights, Home Sizes Vary

Note: I followed my wife, a foreign correspondent for NPR News, to Seoul last year. This is one of a series of posts exploring our adopted country’s demographics, politics and other nerdy data stuff. Let me know if you have ideas for future posts. I never lived in a high-rise building before moving to South Korea, but now home is 35 stories above central Seoul. The view is pretty great...

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Seoul’s Steamy Summer

Note: I followed my wife, a foreign correspondent for NPR News, to Seoul last year. This is one of a series of posts exploring our adopted country’s demographics, politics and other nerdy data stuff. Let me know if you have ideas for future posts. I’ve been away from Seoul for much of the summer, but now that I’m back it’s impossible not to hear all the complaining — among expats...

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Are People in Colder Countries Taller? (Continued…)

Earlier this week I posted two scatterplots examining the relationship between a country’s average temperature and its male residents’ average height. The data show some correlation, but there probably are several of other factors affecting height as well. The earlier plots shaded the country dots by income and region, allowing more context about the groupings of countries (hint: Europe is colder and taller). This next version, however, proportionally sizes the...

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Are People in Colder Countries Taller?

I got married in Amsterdam. One thing I remember most about my time in The Netherlands is the obvious height of the locals. Both men and women, generally, are quite tall. A new study supports my anecdotal observation. Dutch men are the tallest people in the World (women there are second), followed closely by some of their European neighbors. People in Southeast Asian and African countries are, on the other...

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Is South Korea’s National Assembly More Liberal Than South Koreans?

Members of South Korea’s legislative branch, known as the National Assembly, recently took a poll to determine where they land on the ideological spectrum. The group as a whole appears to be getting more liberal, according to an analysis of the results. The poll, conducted by the Korea JoongAng Daily and the Korean Political Science Association, gave lawmakers a 15-question ideological test. The questions focused on the Korean alliance with...

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