Line Charts

1 posts
How Wacky Has LA’s Weather Been in 2019? These Charts Help Explain

The famously temperate* weather in Los Angeles just can’t quite figure itself out this year. This year brought “Snowing in Calabasas!”, which was part of the “February to remembrrr”, and by April tempurates were unseasonably balmy. We also got rain and more rain and then some more rain. These charts help explain the wackiness (at least by Los Angeles standards): * Full disclosure: I grew up in Texas. The last...

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Charting the GOP’s Congressional Exodus

Another Republican in the U.S. House — Speaker Paul Ryan, no less — announced his intention not to seek re-election in 2018, adding to the number of members leaving ahead of what’s expected to be an unfavorable mid-term environment for the party. Even before Ryan’s announcement, HuffPost reported that the number of GOP congressmen leaving the chamber, either for retirement or other offices, has hit numbers not seen in decades. His exit...

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Jobless Claims at Five-Decade Low

The number of Americans filing claims for unemployment benefits hasn’t been this low since Richard Nixon was president, according to new data from the U.S. Labor Department. The figures suggest a tight labor market in which employers are retaining employees because there aren’t as many available qualified workers, Bloomberg reported: Overall, the employment picture remains solid, with payrolls continuing to increase and the unemployment rate at the lowest since late...

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Tracking Historical Twitter Followers: @elisewho vs. @stiles

My wife (@elisewho) and I (@stiles) had a silly social media moment yesterday when I replied to one of her tweets — despite the fact that she was sitting in an adjacent room of our Seoul apartment. USC professor Robert Hernandez (a.k.a. @webjournalist) captured it:   Among my favorite media couples are @elisewho and @stiles. pic.twitter.com/HLp3g90Tgc — Robert is in S. Korea (@webjournalist) February 12, 2018 The exchange, which we both...

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Visualizing the Historical Relationship Between White, Black Unemployment Rates

President Trump was right last month when he bragged that black unemployment rate was at a historical low. The rate in December was 6.8 percent, the lowest it’s been since 1972 (though it ticked back up nearly a percentage point last month). But the president’s statement excluded some important context about the historic movement of this rate by race and ethnicity. I’ve tried to explain in these graphics. First, here...

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Visualizing Income Equality in Major World Economies

Years after a global crisis, the world’s largest economies are again growing, The New York Times reported over the weekend. Every major economy on earth is expanding at once, a synchronous wave of growth that is creating jobs, lifting fortunes and tempering fears of popular discontent. A tweet on the subject prompted a friend to respond with a question about whether income inequality has grown — and that in turn prompted...

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The Curious Case of South Korea’s Vanishing Washing Machine Exports

The Trump administration last week announced that it planned to impose higher fees, known as tariffs, to countries that export washing machines and solar panels the United States. The tariffs, prompted by complaints from American companies who feel disadvantaged by global trade, were applied across the world — even though they seem primarily aimed at two nations who dominate the market: China and South Korea. That’s in part because both countries...

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The Curious Case of South Korea’s Vanishing Washing Machine Exports

The Trump administration last week announced that it planned to impose higher fees, known as tariffs, to countries that export washing machines and solar panels the United States. The tariffs, prompted by complaints from American companies who feel disadvantaged by global trade, were applied across the world — even though they seem primarily aimed at two nations who dominate the market: China and South Korea. That’s in part because both countries...

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Common Ground Between North and South Korea: Aging and Shrinking Populations

The birth rate in South Korea, where I live and work, hit a record low this year, leading to concern about the impact an aging (and, eventually, shrinking) population might have on the nation’s society and economy. These charts show the long-term trends, both in actual population and projected changes, according to United Nations data. I’ve added North Korea, which actually has a higher fertility rate today, for context. First,...

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Four Decades of State Unemployment Rates, in Small Multiples, Part 2

I posted recently about how the state-by-state unemployment rate has changed during my lifetime. The result was a small multiples grid that put the states in context with one another. Today I’ve created a new version aimed at identifying more precisely how each state has differed from the national unemployment rate during the last four decades. The lines show the percentage point difference — above (worst) or below (better) — from...

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