Maps

41 posts
Reducing methane to slow climate change

We often hear about increased CO2 in the context of global warming. Hayley Warren and Akshat Rathi for Bloomberg show why we should talk more about methane: In the fight against global warming, methane has flown under the radar for too long. But there’s increasing recognition that tackling the invisible, odorless gas is one of the easiest, cheapest, and most feasible ways to make a real difference in slowing climate...

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Mapping climate change in the Arctic

UnstableGround is a project from the Woodwell Climate Research Center that focuses on climate change in the Arctic: Climate change is transforming the Arctic, impacting people and ecosystems across this vast region. But because our climate system is connected globally, what happens in the Arctic doesn’t stay in the Arctic. Discover how Arctic landscapes are changing and learn about the consequences for communities across the globe. A stories section uses...

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Black neighborhoods split by highways

Rachael Dottle, Laura Bliss and Pablo Robles for Bloomberg on how urban highways often split communities: By the 1960s, the neighborhood’s business core was gone, replaced by newly constructed Interstate 94. Homes that had been a short walk to the shops now overlooked a six-lane highway shuttling commuters between the Twin Cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul. Homes and businesses were seized and destroyed under eminent domain. The neighborhood was...

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Atlas of the Invisible

James Cheshire and Oliver Uberti teamed up for another book of maps, Atlas of the Invisible: Sometimes we miss what we can’t step back to see. Sometimes the invisible only appears with the creep of time. And sometimes, in the case of historical events, the visible becomes invisible with the loss of a generation. Graphics give us the power to zoom out, to compare, to remember. This is their third...

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New Orleans power outage seen via satellite imagery

After Hurricane Ida, New Orleans experienced power outages. The NASA Earth Observatory show the outages by comparing night lights on August 31, 2021 against night lights on August 9, 2021: VIIRS has a low-light sensor—the day/night band—that measures light emissions and reflections. This capability has made it possible to distinguish the intensity, types, and sources of lights and to observe how they change. The data are then processed by the...

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Tracking wildfires in the west

Wildfires continue to burn in the western United States. The New York Times provides a tracker showing the ones burning now, along with air quality and a smoke forecast. A couple of weeks ago, it smelled of smoke in my area and the sky was orange. I guess this is the new norm. Tags: New York Times, tracker, wildfire

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Diversity within the Asian population

Robert Gebeloff, Denise Lu and Miriam Jordan for The New York Times looked at overall increases and variation within the Asian population: North Dakota, South Dakota, Texas, North Carolina and Indiana are among states that experienced major growth in the past decade. And people of Asian descent have been settling in ever larger numbers in states like West Virginia, where the overall population has declined. Tags: Asian, diversity, New York...

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Race and ethnicity map of dots

CNN goes with the dot density map for their first pass on the 2020 decennial. Each dot represents a certain number of people depending on your zoom level. Color represents race or ethnicity. Does CNN have a limited color palette that they’re allowed to use? I would’ve gone for more contrast between the light blue for white and darker-but-still-light blue for American Indian/Alaskan Native. See also: Dustin Cable’s racial dot...

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Shift in white population vs. people of color

The New York Times go with the angled arrows to show the shifts in racial population. The red-orange arrows show an increase in the share of white population, and the teal arrows show an increase in the share of people of color. Longer arrows mean a greater percentage point change. Whereas The Washington Post focused more on the changes for each demographic individually, NYT focused more on how two broad...

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Maps of racial population change

Using their peaks and valleys metaphor, The Washington Post shows the shift in racial population between 2010 and 2020. The open triangles, one for each county, show population with width, population growth with height, and fastest-growing race or ethnicity with color. You might recognize the form from the Post’s 2016 election results, but there’s a small wrinkle when you look at the breakdowns for individual groups. The triangles flip upside...

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