Maps

396 posts
Scale of the Tonga eruption

Manas Sharma and Simon Scarr used satellite imagery to show the scale of the Tonga eruption, which spurted a 24-mile cloud that grew to 400 miles in diameter in an hour. Notice the little Manhattan in the bottom left corner in the image above. However, instead of leaving it at that, Sharma and Scarr animated the eruption over familiar geographic areas to better see how big it was. The cloud...

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Global ripple effect from underwater volcano

An underwater volcano erupted about 40 miles off the coast of the main island of Tonga. Using infrared data from the GOES satellite operated by NOAA, Mathew Barlow animated the ripple from the the source to around the world. pic.twitter.com/bYTm3p78lz — Dr. Mathew Barlow (@MathewABarlow) January 16, 2022 The filtered view, which shows band 13 data from the satellite’s sensors, typically to view cloud cover, is really something. Tags: Tonga,...

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All-time temperature records broken in 2021

Using data from NOAA, Krishna Karra and Tim Wallace for The New York Times mapped all-time temperature records set in 2021. Red indicates an all-time high, and blue indicates an all-time low. Circle size represents the degree difference from the previous record. Tags: climate change, New York Times, temperature

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Drop rain anywhere in the world and see where it ends up

One of my favorites of the year, Sam Learner’s River Runner shows you a terrain map that lets you place a drop of rain anywhere in the contiguous United States. You’re then taken on a river tour that shows where the drop ends up. Learner just expanded the project to let you drop water anywhere in the world. Tags: rain, river, Sam Learner, water

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David Rumsey Map Center, cataloging historical works

The David Rumsey Map Center at Stanford houses hundreds of thousands of maps dating back to the 1500s. Andres Picon for San Francisco Chronicle wrote about the collection: At the heart of that endeavor is the digitization of Rumsey’s vast physical collection, a project he began in the late 1990s when he launched davidrumsey.com, a constantly growing aggregation of about 112,000 digitized historical maps from his personal inventory. Rumsey, 77,...

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Shifting currents and melting ice in the Antarctic

Based on data from autonomous sensors floating in the oceans, researchers are able to model the flows and characteristics of ocean currents in more detail than ever before. For The New York Times, Henry Fountain and Jeremy White show how the shifts have unwelled centuries-old water deep in the ocean, which releases carbon into the air. The scrollytelling format of this piece works well to show sensor estimates over time....

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Mapping the weather disasters of 2021

Zach Levitt and Bonnie Berkowitz for The Washington Post mapped and animated the natural and weather disasters from 2021. Differing from the 2019 version by Tim Meko, they framed it by month, which let them start with floods in January, through the storms in March, April, and May, to fires in July, up to the tornadoes in December. It was a rough year for many, only compounded by that virus....

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Animated map of microplastics in the ocean

Using estimates based on satellite data, Joshua Stevens for NASA Earth Observatory mapped the concentration of microplastics in the ocean over time: Researchers at the University of Michigan (UM) recently developed a new method to map the concentration of ocean microplastics around the world. The researchers used data from eight microsatellites that are part of the Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) mission. Radio signals from GPS satellites reflect off...

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Shrinking the Mercator projection to equal area

It’s been a while since we got our regular reminder that the Mercator projection is better for navigation on the tradeoff for distorted area at the poles. Neil Kaye provides an animation: Animating the mercator projection so countries and territories are correct size and shape in relation to each other.#dataviz #30Daymapchallenge #worldisnotflat #day28 pic.twitter.com/968GSBepA1 — Neil Kaye (@neilrkaye) November 28, 2021 See also the Mercator projection with the poles shifted...

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Map made of candy corn to show corn production

With candy corn as her medium, Jill Hubley mapped corn production in the United States, based on data from the USDA. With just three hues of yellow, orange, and white and three heights to match, Hubley was able to clearly show the geographical patterns. For reference, here is the USDA corn map: Finally, I have a use for my kids’ leftover Halloween candy. Tags: candy, corn, Jill Hubley, physical

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