Maps

38 posts
Maps of land required to get to net-zero emissions

Princeton University’s Net-Zero America project analyzes and models the infrastructure required to get to net-zero carbon emissions nationally. Dave Merrill for Bloomberg highlighted the group’s estimates for land usage to build things like wind and solar farms, which, as you might imagine, will require millions of acres. Tags: Bloomberg, carbon, Dave Merrill, energy, land

0 0
Melting glaciers

Niko Kommenda for The Guardian used small multiples to show 90 of the largest glaciers in the world and how they have melted over many decades. The animation transitions between two time periods for each glacier, showing what was there earlier and what is left. Tags: climate change, glaciers, Guardian, Niko Kommenda

0 0
States that gained and lost seats with 2020 count

The Census Bureau announced their state population totals, so we can see who gained and lost seats: The tables aren’t accessible yet, but during the live conference, the bureau noted that the difference between New York losing a seat (which they did) and staying the same was only a difference of 89 people. It’ll be interesting to see these small deltas for all the states. Tags: census, government, representation

0 0
Compare the scale of any area in the world

Riffing on the Ever Given Ever Ywhere, which lets you place the Ever Given container ship anywhere on a map, Stamen built Scale-a-Tron, which lets you place anywhere on a map, well, anywhere on a map. Just draw a polygon around an area and then pan to compare the scale of your selected area against anywhere in the world. It’s scale-rific. Tags: scale, Stamen

0 0
Maps of migration to smaller cities

Steven Bernard for Financial Times, in a report by Claire Bushey and Steff Chavez, mapped net inflows (paywalled), based on property searches on home listing site Redfin. This shows a slightly different angle from NYT’s analysis, which showed less change year-over-year. Tags: Financial Times, housing, migration

0 0
Rise of a variant in the U.K.

As you likely know, there are coronavirus variants around the world. Reuters mapped the spread of the Kent variant, which was detected in the English county of Kent. Tags: coronavirus, Reuters, United Kingdom, variant

0 0
Make the Ever Given get stuck anywhere

The Ever Given got stuck in the Suez Canal. It was refloated. So now you can use this “ridiculous thing” by Garrett Dash Nelson to get the Ever Given stuck anywhere in the world. Show the ship to scale and click-and-drag the satellite imagery, and you get a pretty good idea of how big the thing is. Tags: Ever Given, Garrett Dash Nelson, scale, Suez Canal

0 0
Steer through the Suez Canal

To better understand the challenge of steering a giant container ship through the Suez Canal, CNN made an interactive that lets you do just that. Control the power and point a silhouette of the Ever Given in the right direction without crashing. It is of course a simplification that doesn’t account for things like water depth and passing boats, but it does leave you wondering how giant ships don’t get...

0 0
Mapping all of the voters

In what seems to have become a trend of making more and more detailed election maps, NYT’s The Upshot mapped results down to the addresses of 180 million voters: The maps above — and throughout this article — show their estimates of partisanship down to the individual voter, colored by the researchers’ best guess based on public data like demographic information, voter registration and whether voters participated in party primaries....

0 0
Pandemic timeline as animated dot density map

As a lead-in and backdrop to a timeline of the past year by The Washington Post, an animated dot density map represents Covid-19 deaths. “Every point of light is a life lost to coronavirus.” Tags: animation, coronavirus, pandemic, timeline, Washington Post

0 0