mortality

83 posts
Comparing the coronavirus to past deadly events

One way to estimate the impact of the coronavirus is to compare it against expected mortality. People are still dying of other causes. The virus has increased the total counts around the world. The New York Times compared these increases against other deadly events: Only the worst disasters completely upend normal patterns of death, overshadowing, if only briefly, everyday causes like cancer, heart disease and car accidents. Here’s how the...

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Possible coronavirus deaths compared against other causes

Based on estimates from public health researcher James Lawler, The Upshot shows the range of coronavirus deaths, given variable infection and fatality rate. Adjust with the sliders and see how the death count (over a year) compares against other major causes of death: Dr. Lawler’s estimate, 480,000 deaths, is higher than the number who die in a year from dementia, emphysema, stroke or diabetes. There are only two causes of...

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With terminal cancer, a patient tracks drug does in a dashboard over her final days

Kelly Martin died of cancer on September 30. She was able to enjoy her final days at home, and as she knew the end was near, she kept track of her drug doses in a dashboard: Brain tumors are unpredictable. I don’t want my last days with a personality that isn’t mine. I wanted to laugh, to enjoy the days, and fart around in the garden as much as possible....

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Heatmap shows deaths by age in different countries

This interactive heatmap by Jonas Schöley shows mortality rates by age. Just use the dropdown menu to see the data for various countries. You can also compare male and female populations and countries. As you might expect, you can see mortality rates decrease steadily, especially in the younger ages. Spikes or abrupt color changes might indicate war or disease. [via @maartenzam] Tags: age, mortality

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Years of life lost due to breathing bad air

Researchers at the University of Chicago’s Energy Policy Institute estimated the number of years lost and the number of people affected due to particulate matter in the air. They estimated per country. The Washington Post used a mosaic plot, aka a Marimekko chart, to show the differences. The width of each column represents total population for a country. The sections in each columns represent the number of people who will...

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Shifting Death

The most common causes of death change as you age. They have also shifted over the years. This animation shows the details of these changes. Read More

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Weighing the risk of moderate alcohol consumption

A research study on mortality and alcohol consumption is making the rounds. Its main conclusion is that all alcohol consumption is bad for you, because of increased risk. David Spiegelhalter, the chair of the Winton Centre for Risk and Evidence Communication, offers a different interpretation of the data: Let’s consider one drink a day (10g, 1.25 UK units) compared to none, for which the authors estimated an extra 4 (918–914)...

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Life expectancy by state, against the US average

FiveThirtyEight continues their look at mortality by geography. This graphic by Anna Maria Barry-Jester compares life expectancy over time for each state. Purple means below average and orange means above. The good news is that all the lines trend upward. The bad news is that some states are trending upwards much more slowly than the rest. Tags: FiveThirtyEight, mortality, small multiples

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Life expectancy if all diseases were magically cured

Here’s a fun what-if simulation that imagines a world where all natural causes of death were gone. People only die of things like car crashes and homicide. The result: people who live to thousands of years old. Of course, this assumes that the likelihood of dying from external causes stays the same. With such a long life expectancy, do people start to take more risks? Or do we become more...

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Mapping death in America, 1980 to 2014

Nationwide mortality data relies on death certificates, and when cause of death is unknown, sometimes “garbage codes” are used to fill the space on the form. This leads to unwanted noise, because garbage in, garbage out as the saying goes. The Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation tried to soften the noise and strengthen the signal. Ella Koeze for FiveThirtyEight mapped the results. Flip through causes and animate over time....

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