National Geographic

92 posts
Curves for the 1918 flu pandemic

For National Geographic, Nina Strochlic and Riley D. Champine look back at the 1918 pandemic for clues about the future: The 1918 flu, also known as the Spanish Flu, lasted until 1920 and is considered the deadliest pandemic in modern history. Today, as the world grinds to a halt in response to the coronavirus, scientists and historians are studying the 1918 outbreak for clues to the most effective way to...

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Stay-at-home orders seen through decreased seismic activity

The pandemic has affected all parts of life, which can be seen from many points of view. For National Geographic, Taylor Maggiacomo and Maya Wei-Haas on the decrease in average ground displacement: Lulls in seismic activity have occurred in the past, generally in short spurts. But COVID-19—the disease caused by the novel coronavirus—has imposed a lengthy hush in populated regions across the planet. And seismometers on multiple continents are recording...

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Atlas of all the moons in our solar system

National Geographic went all out on their atlas of moons. Space. Orbits. Rotating and interactive objects in the sky. Ooo. You’ll want to bookmark this one for later, so you can spend time with it. Tags: moon, National Geographic, space

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Increasing ocean temperatures, decreasing ice

For National Geographic, Kennedy Elliot made a series of heatmaps that show the relative shifts in the ocean: The oceans don’t just soak up excess heat from the atmosphere; they also absorb excess carbon dioxide, which is changing the chemistry of seawater, making it more acidic. “Ocean acidification is one simple and inescapable consequence of rising atmospheric CO2 that is both predictable and impossible to attribute to any other cause,”...

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Growing similarity in global diet

Diet around the world is growing more similar. National Geographic charted estimates of the similarity over time: People increasingly eat the same types of food. They now get more calories from wheat, rice, corn, sugar, oil crops, and animal products. Meanwhile, consumption of grains such as sorghum, millet, and rye and of root crops such as cassava and yams has fallen. Comparing diets by country, the international agricultural research group...

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Mapping predominant race block by block

Based on data from the Census Bureau, National Geographic mapped predominant race in 11 million administrative regions in the United States. Many of the regions are the size of a single block. Looking at the national overview, the country looks predominantly white (represented blue), but as you zoom in for more details, you start to see the mix. Tags: National Geographic, race

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All the astronauts and their spaceflights

556 people have gone to space. In an article on their changed perspectives, Jason Treat for National Geographic shows when these select few went on their travels. Tags: astronauts, National Geographic, space

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Mapping happiness

Gallup surveyed Americans about their well-being across various factors. National Geographic gets into some of the geographic breakdowns. While Gallup’s survey doesn’t attempt to explain why individuals feel the way they do, it does expose some commonalities among the lives of Americans. Respondents from the lowest ranked states were more likely to report worse physical and financial health: They were more likely to smoke, be obese, and have little interest...

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Tour of Saturn through Cassini, the satellite that crashes on Friday

About two decades ago, the Cassini satellite headed towards Saturn and has been orbiting the planet for 13 years. The satellite is scheduled to crash into Saturn’s atmosphere on Friday so Nadia Drake and Brian T. Jacobs for National Geographic toured through the satellite’s best finds. This is quite the scroller and feels pretty grand. No matter how many times it happens, it still blows my mind that satellites are...

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National Geographic Infographics, the book

Infographics devolved a bit in recent years, but there was a time the term wasn’t immediately associated with content marketing. (And there is still plenty of good infographic work that actually informs.) National Geographic is one such source of inspiration, and now you can get a best-of collection in book form that spans over a century. With an essay by Nigel Holmes, charting the evolution of National Geographic over the...

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