Network Visualization

3 posts
Distorting geography to show train travels

Jan Willem Tulp visualized train travel times using distance and color as an indicator. His reasoning: When a train starts running from one station to the next station, conceptually, these two stations will temporarily be closer to each other. And that is exactly what this visualization shows: whenever a train moves to the next station — and only for as long as a train is moving — the origin station...

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Recursive painting in real life

It started with a mom holding her painting of a bird. Then someone painted that photo and took a picture of himself holding the painting. Then someone painted the photo of the man holding the painting of the picture of the mom holding the bird. The recursion continued. Luckily someone diagrammed all of the iterations: Just wow. Tags: painting, recursion

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See every member’s path to the House of Representatives

For The New York Times, Sahil Chinoy and Jessia Ma visualized the path to Congress for every member. See it all at once like above or search for specific members. The vertical scale represents previous categories of work and education and looks like it’s sorted by how common the categories were among Republicans and Democrats. The horizontal scale represents time, which starts at undergraduate and finishes at the House. Nice....

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Tree of Life

From Evogeneao: This Tree of Life diagram is based primarily on the evolutionary relationships so wonderfully related in Dr. Richard Dawkins’ The Ancestor’s Tale, and timetree.org. The smallest branches are purely illustrative. They are intended to suggest the effect of mass extinctions on diversity, and changes in diversity through time. This diagram is NOT intended to be a scholarly reference tool! It is intended to be an easy-to-understand illustration of...

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Relationships between philosophers over time

Maximilian Noichl visualized the relationships between philosophers from 600 B.C. to 160 B.C.: The Sociology of Philosophies is a fascinating book by Randall Collins, in which he attempts to lay out a global history of philosophy in terms of interpersonal relations between philosophers. These connections are layed out in the form of graphs. This my attempt to visualize a bit of that data, depicting 440 years of western ancient philosophy....

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Marvel Cinematic Universe as a 3-D network

The Straits Times visualized the Marvel Cinematic Universe with a 3-D browsable network. Link colors represent type of relationship, and proximity naturally represents commonalities between characters. Click on individual characters for information on each. Turn on the sound for extra dramatics. Tags: comics, fiction, Marvel

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A game to better understand the wisdom (and madness) of crowds

You’ve probably heard of the wisdom of crowds. The general idea, popularized by James Surowiecki’s book, is that a large group of non-experts can solve problems collectively better than a single expert. As you can imagine, there are a lot of subtleties and complexities to this idea. Nicky Case helps you understand with a game. Draw networks, run simulations, and learn in the process. The game takes about a half...

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Mappings for Choose Your Own Adventure books

Every now and then there’s a visual exploration of the Choose Your Own Adventure series. It seems that each gets a bit more complex, so I appreciate the simplicity of these official maps from Chooseco, which shows the structure of each book. Atlas Obscura provides the details. On the official maps, however, the endings aren’t coded in any way that reveals their nature. Instead, they operate according to a simple...

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How disinformation spreads in a network

Disinformation is kind of a problem these days, yeah? Fatih Erikli uses a simulation that works like a disaster spread model applied to social networks to give an idea of how disinformation spreads. I tried to visualize how a disinformation becomes a post-truth by the people who subscribed in a network. We can think this network as a social media such as Facebook or Twitter. The nodes (points) in the...

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Apple vs. Google company structure, as seen through patents

For Co.Design, Periscopic compared patent ownership between Apple and Google, which ends up providing a good idea of company structure. “Over the past 10 years Apple has produced 10,975 patents with a team of 5,232 inventors, and Google has produced 12,386 with a team of 8,888,” writes Wes Bernegger, data explorer at Periscopic. Those numbers are, frankly, pretty similar in terms of proportion. “The most notable difference we see is...

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