New York Times

24 posts
County stay-at-home orders and change in distance traveled

Based on cellphone data from Cuebiq, The New York Times looked at how different parts of the country reduced their travel between the end of February and the end of March. Some counties really stayed at home. Some not so much: In areas where public officials have resisted or delayed stay-at-home orders, people changed their habits far less. Though travel distances in those places have fallen drastically, last week they...

0 0
Coronavirus data at the state and county level, from The New York Times

Comprehensive national data on Covid-19 has been hard to come by through government agencies. The New York Times released their own dataset and will be updating regularly: The tracking effort grew from a handful of Times correspondents to a large team of journalists that includes experts in data and graphics, staff news assistants and freelance reporters, as well as journalism students from Northwestern University, the University of Missouri and the...

0 0
Unemployment spike

The Department of Labor released the numbers for last week’s unemployment filings. 3.28 million for the country. For The New York Times, Quocktrung Bui and Justin Wolfers show the numbers relative to the past and a breakdown by state: This downturn is different because it’s a direct result of relatively synchronized government directives that forced millions of stores, schools and government offices to close. It’s as if an economic umpire...

0 0
Mobile phone data shows decreased movement nationwide

Stuart A. Thompson and Yaryna Serkez for New York Times Opinion on decreasing movement, based on mobile phone data: The impact of social distancing and work-from-home measures has been captured using data on smartphone movements, an analysis of which was provided to the Times Opinion section by Descartes Labs, a geospatial analysis company. The data shows how states hit hard by the virus, like New York, California and Washington, have...

0 0
Particle flows show how the coronavirus ramped up

Using a combination of estimates based on cell phone movements and outbreak size, The New York Times shows how the coronavirus started with a few cases and then spread around the world. The particle flows to represent travel volume from city to city is something else. NYT used a scrollytelling format that starts on a geographic map. You see a few points at first, the virus spreads, and then there’s...

0 0
Lagging coronavirus testing in the US

Coronavirus testing in the United States has been a slow process to say the least. The New York Times shows how test counts contrast against other countries. There’s some catching up to do. Tags: coronavirus, New York Times, testing

0 0
Canceled flights due to coronavirus

With an animated side-by-side map, The New York Times shows canceled flights in efforts to slow down the spread of the coronavirus. The left map represents 12,814 flights within China on January 23. The right map shows 1,662 on February 13. Keep scrolling to see changes for flights leaving China to other countries. Tags: China, coronavirus, flights, New York Times

0 0
Privacy algorithm could lead to Census undercount of small towns

To increase anonymity in the Census records, the bureau is testing an algorithm that removes real people and inserts imaginary people in various locations. As you can imagine, this carries a set of challenges. Gus Wezerek and David Van Riper for New York Times Opinion ask what effects this could have on small towns. Tags: census, counting, New York Times, privacy

0 0
✚ Misleading or Not? A Chart Showing Coronavirus Fatality Rate (The Process #75)

Welcome to another episode of Misleading or Not? where we look at a chart and decide if it's misleading or not. Read More

0 0
To get your personal data, provide more personal data

File another one under the sounds-good-on-paper-but-really-challenging-in-practice. Kashmir Hill, for The New York Times, describes the challenges of new laws that allow users to request the data that companies collect on them: Since then, two groups of researchers have demonstrated that it’s possible to fool the systems created to comply with G.D.P.R. to get someone else’s personal information. One of the researchers, James Pavur, 24, a doctoral student at Oxford University,...

0 0