New York Times

83 posts
Comparing the coronavirus to past deadly events

One way to estimate the impact of the coronavirus is to compare it against expected mortality. People are still dying of other causes. The virus has increased the total counts around the world. The New York Times compared these increases against other deadly events: Only the worst disasters completely upend normal patterns of death, overshadowing, if only briefly, everyday causes like cancer, heart disease and car accidents. Here’s how the...

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Increase in cases since states reopened

Using the now all too familiar baseline chart, where all of the time series line up relative to to starting point, The New York Times shows how case rates have faired since states reopened. Up, up, and away. Tags: coronavirus, New York Times

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Race and the virus

The New York Times obtained data on race and those affected by the coronavirus. Not everyone has been affected equally: Early numbers had shown that Black and Latino people were being harmed by the virus at higher rates. But the new federal data — made available after The New York Times sued the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — reveals a clearer and more complete picture: Black and Latino...

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How the coronavirus won in the United States

Using a wide array of sources, The New York Times shows how the virus spread at a granular level. The foundation is a map with moving dots, and the piece takes you through movements based on cell phone data and air travel in concert with known coronavirus cases. Your jaw might drop a few times as you go through it. Back in March, NYT published a similar work for how...

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Gaps between black and white America

New York Times Opinion compared several demographics, such as unemployment and income, between majority-black and majority-white neighborhoods in the United States. They come back to the zipper chart technique where the dots start together and then separate to emphasize the gaps. Horizontally, dots are sorted by smallest to largest difference. Tags: demographics, New York Times, race

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Vaccine tracker

As we know, it typically takes years to develop a vaccine that is approved for wide scale use. For the coronavirus, researchers are trying to speed up that timeline. Jonathan Corum and Carl Zimmer for The New York Times have started a vaccine tracker to keep watch. They’ve categorized the vaccines by phase and those that are part of Operation Warp Speed. (Earmarked for later: a closer look at government...

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Challenges of reopening the meatpacking plant

To reopen safely, meatpacking plants have to take precautions to provide space and separation for workers. But the process typically involves a lot of people working close together. The New York Times illustrates the process and the challenges moving forward. Tags: coronavirus, meatpacking, New York Times, reopening

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Health conditions and income

A large proportion of those who died from Covid-19 had pre-existing medical conditions. The percentage of those who have pre-existing medical conditions changes a lot by income group. Based on estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, we can see by how much. For New York Times Opinion, Yaryna Serkez charted the difference for the largest cities in the United States. Tags: coronavirus, health, income, New York Times,...

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Failed CDC data pipeline

The New York Times reports on how the CDC struggled and failed on many levels. On the data front, where it was so important in the beginnings to gauge what was about to happen, the CDC failed to get accurate data to the people who needed to make decisions quickly: The C.D.C. could not produce accurate counts of how many people were being tested, compile complete demographic information on confirmed...

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54 ways coronavirus changed the world

The coronavirus has changed everything. Larry Buchanan, for The New York Times, goes minimalist with a series of up and down arrows to show which direction things moved. Even though there’s no magnitude or axes, it still works. In some ways, the simplistic view is more effective than regular charts. Tags: coronavirus, Larry Buchanan, New York Times

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