New York Times

114 posts
To get your personal data, provide more personal data

File another one under the sounds-good-on-paper-but-really-challenging-in-practice. Kashmir Hill, for The New York Times, describes the challenges of new laws that allow users to request the data that companies collect on them: Since then, two groups of researchers have demonstrated that it’s possible to fool the systems created to comply with G.D.P.R. to get someone else’s personal information. One of the researchers, James Pavur, 24, a doctoral student at Oxford University,...

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How police use facial recogntion

For The New York Times, Jennifer Valentino-DeVries looked at the current state of facial recognition in law enforcement: Officials in Florida say that they query the system 4,600 times a month. But the technology is no magic bullet: Only a small percentage of the queries break open investigations of unknown suspects, the documents indicate. The tool has been effective with clear images — identifying recalcitrant detainees, people using fake IDs...

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Squirrel census count in Central Park

In 2018, there was a squirrel census count at Central Park in New York. New York Times graphics editor Denise Lu participated in the citizen science project “to collect the kind of data that underlies the work I do every day.” Lu did a short but interesting piece on her experience counting squirrels. You can download the data via NYC Open Data. Now I’m wondering if I should apply to...

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Where the Australia fires are burning

The New York Times zoomed in on southeastern Australia where the fires have hit the worst. They also used small multiples to show the scale of the fires the past few months against previous years. Tags: Australia, New York Times, wildfire

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One leaked file, the location of 12 million smartphones

A file leaked to The New York Times contained location traces of 12 million unique smartphones. Stuart A. Thompson and Charlie Warzel went digging: The data set is large enough that it surely points to scandal and crime but our purpose wasn’t to dig up dirt. We wanted to document the risk of underregulated surveillance. Watching dots move across a map sometimes revealed hints of faltering marriages, evidence of drug...

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Making invisible gas leaks visible

For The New York Times, Jonah M. Kessel and Hiroko Tabuchi went to oilfields in Texas with an infrared camera to look for methane leaks. Okay, important topic here, and the contrast between regular photograph and infrared video is alarming, but I may have been drawn to the methodology at the end: To create images of methane emissions in the Permian Basin, The Times used a custom-built FLIR camera that...

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Compare your city’s air pollution to the rest of the world

High air pollution can lead to serious health risks, but you can’t usually see particulate matter floating in the air around you. So we have no base for comparison and only an abstract sense of what’s bad and okay. The New York Times tries to make the pollution more visible. They lead with moving particles across your screen at a density that matches approximately to what the Environmental Protection Agency...

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Paying for Elizabeth Warren’s proposed policies

Elizabeth Warren has big plans, and they would cost a lot with a big shift in government spending. The New York Times breaks it down. I realize the topic here is important, but NYT’s bubble game is on point in this piece. Check out those transitions as the bubbles funnel into the screen from the top and how the pie-like segments rotate as each segment is highlighted. Force-directed graphs, for...

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Animated line chart to show the rich paying less taxes

David Leonhardt, for The New York Times, discusses the relatively low tax rates for the country’s 400 wealthiest households. The accompanying animated line chart by Stuart A. Thompson shows how the rates have been dropping over the years, which are now “below the rates for almost everyone else.” Oh. Tags: New York Times, rich, Stuart A. Thompson, taxes

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Sprawling flood waters across the Midwest and South

The New York Times mapped the slow, wide-reaching flood waters this year so far: To measure the scope of the spring floods, The New York Times analyzed satellite data from the Joint Polar Satellite System using software, developed by government and academic researchers for flood detection, that is frequently used in disaster response. The data covers the period from Jan. 15 to June 30 and shows an interconnected catastrophe along...

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