New York Times

1 posts
Scale of the Hong Kong protest

You know those sped up videos where there’s a long line for something and someone walks the length of it? The New York Times did the scrolly equivalent for the recent Hong Kong protest, using snaps from aerial video and stringing them together geographically. A lot of people showed up. Tags: Hong Kong, New York Times, photography, protest

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Home zoning in major cities

The single-family home. It’s part of the American dream, but it can be awfully expensive when land grows scarce. Emily Badger and Quoctrung Bui for The Upshot map and discuss the current approaches of major cities: A reckoning with single-family zoning is necessary, they say, amid mounting crises over housing affordability, racial inequality and climate change. But take these laws away, many homeowners fear, and their property values and quality...

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Readability of privacy policies for big tech companies

For The New York Times, Kevin Litman-Navarro plotted the length and readability of privacy policies for large companies: To see exactly how inscrutable they have become, I analyzed the length and readability of privacy policies from nearly 150 popular websites and apps. Facebook’s privacy policy, for example, takes around 18 minutes to read in its entirety – slightly above average for the policies I tested. The comparison is between websites...

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Rise of the summer sequel

For The New York Times, Keith Collins shows the growing popularity of summer sequels among the big movie studios. If there is money to be made, they will come. Tags: box office, New York Times, sequel

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Stephen Curry scores every arena’s popcorn

I marked this article for later reading. It’s about Stephen Curry’s love of popcorn as a pre-game and half-time snack. Sounded amusing. Then I got to it and discovered that he scores every arena’s popcorn on a five-factor, five-point scale using a worksheet. Nice. See the full scorecard. Tags: New York Times, popcorn, Stephen Curry

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What happened at Notre-Dame

Notre-Dame in Paris, France was on fire. The New York Times describes what happened in a detailed yet concise information graphic. A 3-D model provides the imagery, and rotation and zooming highlight the relevant points. Tags: New York Times, Notre-Dame

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Facial recognition machine for $60

For The New York Times, Sahil Chinoy on privacy and how easy it is now to automate surveillance through public video feeds: To demonstrate how easy it is to track people without their knowledge, we collected public images of people who worked near Bryant Park (available on their employers’ websites, for the most part) and ran one day of footage through Amazon’s commercial facial recognition service. Our system detected 2,750...

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Bad data from a faulty sensor on the Boeing 737 Max

The New York Times illustrated what likely happened in the Ethiopian Airlines and Lion Air crashes. The walkthrough uses a picture of a plane, simple and clear annotation, and animation to help readers understand the dangers of a faulty sensor. Tags: Boeing, crash, New York Times

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Internet under the sea

To connect servers around the world, there are actual cables that run under the ocean. The New York Times mapped current and future cables, with a focus on the ones owned by Amazon, Facebook, Google, and Microsoft. “Content providers like Microsoft, Google, Facebook and Amazon now own or lease more than half of the undersea bandwidth.” Sure. Totally fine. Tags: Internet, New York Times

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How fast emissions would reduce if other plans were adopted

The United States is doing pretty poorly in reducing emissions. For The New York Times, Brad Plumer and Blacki Migloiozzi, show the current status and what could happen if the U.S. adopted more drastic plans already in place around the world. The moving particles underneath the trend line is a nice touch to bring the abstract closer to what the data represents. Contrast this piece with Plumer’s piece from a...

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