Population

1 posts
Rapidly growing African cities

In a multi-faceted piece, The Washington Post described the rapidly growing cities in Africa that are projected to be the most populated cities in the world: In three projections by the University of Toronto’s Global Cities Institute, Africa accounted for at least 10 of the world’s 20 most populous cities in 2100. Even in the institute’s middle-of-the-road development scenario, cities that many Americans may seldom read about, such as Niamey,...

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Census Mapper, a tool to visualize population and racial shifts

Pitch Interactive and the Census 2020 Data Co-op, supported by the Google News Initiative, made a tool that lets you easily map population shifts since 2010. It’s called Census Mapper. Built with journalists in mind, you can zoom in to the tract level and select any set of racial groups. The map updates. Once you’ve found what you’re looking for, you can embed the tool on a website. You can...

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Where Americans Live

Everyone gets a dot. You get a dot. And you get a dot. And you.Read More

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Race and ethnicity map of dots

CNN goes with the dot density map for their first pass on the 2020 decennial. Each dot represents a certain number of people depending on your zoom level. Color represents race or ethnicity. Does CNN have a limited color palette that they’re allowed to use? I would’ve gone for more contrast between the light blue for white and darker-but-still-light blue for American Indian/Alaskan Native. See also: Dustin Cable’s racial dot...

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Historical shifts in where people live

The places in the United States with the highest populations weren’t always like that. There were shifts over decades. With the recent Census release for state populations, Harry Stevens and Nick Kirkpatrick for The Washington Post go all in with a series of bump charts to show the changes in state population rankings since 1920. They point out historical markers along the way, split it up by region, and provide...

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Map of nighttime lights normalized by population

You’ve probably seen the composite map of lights at night from NASA. It looks a lot like population density. Tim Wallace adjusted the map for population, so that you can see (roughly) the areas that produce more light per person. Adjusting NOAA nighttime lights for population reveals areas that create an outsized amount of light per person living there. pic.twitter.com/k91cGyWvLd — Tim Wallace (@wallacetim) November 10, 2019 Tags: lights, population,...

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Game: How many US cities can you name?

How many US cities can you name? Here’s a quick and fun game by Ian Fisher to find out. Simply start entering as many as you can think of and rack up population counts as a sort of point system. Tags: city, game, population

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Searching for the densest square kilometer in different cities

Based on data from Gridded Population of the World, geographer Garrett Dash Nelson calculated the square kilometers in major cities with the highest population density. On CityLab: In the interactive visualization, I’ve taken GPW data for a curated selection of American cities. Some have old, historic cores, and others are dominated by more recent development; some have constricting physical geographies and others lie on relatively flat, open plains; some were...

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Population mountains

You’ve seen the maps of population density. You’ve seen the jokes. But you haven’t seen population at high granularity in a 3-D view. Matt Daniels for The Pudding used a mountain metaphor to show the peaks and valleys of population around the world. You get more out of the data in this view than you would the overhead, which tends to obscure the variation in large cities. Although if you...

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Ask the Question, Visualize the Answer

Let's work through a practical example to see how asking and answering questions helps guide you towards more focused data graphics. Read More

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