Quartz

1 posts
Stores that closed on famous shopping streets

Pre-pandemic, we walked around shopping areas casually browsing, but a lot of retail didn’t make it through. For Quartz, Amanda Shendruk looks at the closures on famous shopping streets, complete with a location-appropriate vehicle to drive in and a police car that appears if you scroll too fast. Tags: Amanda Shendruk, coronavirus, Quartz, shopping, streets

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Analysis of skin tones in beauty ads on Instagram

For Quartz, Amanda Shendruk and Marc Bain analyzed skin tones that appeared in beauty and fashion ads on Instagram. The graphics use Blackout Tuesday on June 2, 2020, when many brands vowed to improve diversity to better reflect the world, as a point of comparison. Using median skin color as the main metric, some companies shifted more than others. Tags: ads, diversity, fashion, Instagram, Quartz

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Machine learning to find movie ideas

Speaking of A.I. and fiction, Adam Epstein for Quartz reported on how Wattpad, the platform for people to share stories, uses machine learning to find potential movies: Wattpad uses a machine-learning program called StoryDNA to scan all the stories on its platform and surface the ones that seem like candidates for TV or film development. It works on both macro and micro levels, analyzing big-picture audience engagement trends to identify...

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Map shows where to go to get away from fireworks

Using a voronoi map, David Yanofsky for Quartz mapped the places in the US that are the farthest away from legal fireworks sellers in case you need to get away from the early celebrations. Or, people could just stop setting off fireworks at 1am. That would be okay too. Tags: David Yanofsky, fireworks, Quartz

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Coronavirus testing accuracy

Medical tests do not always provide certain results. Quartz illustrated this with the accuracy of a simulated antibody test that identifies 90% of those infected and 95% of those not infected: That means that if you took the test and got a positive result, there’s a 45.1% chance it’s correct. If you got a negative result, there’s a 99.6% chance your result is accurate. Of course, this doesn’t mean don’t...

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How parents spend time with their kids

For Quartz, Dan Kopf and Jenny Anderson on how time spent with kids changes with age: In the very beginning, it’s all about physical care, otherwise known as the stuff that makes your arms tired. A fifth of time parents spend with kids before their first birthday is on what could be described as keep-them-alive tasks. At age 1, this falls dramatically and it becomes playtime: peek-a-boo, stack the box,...

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The rise and sharp plummet of the name Heather

Hey, no one told me that baby name analysis was back in fashion. Dan Kopf for Quartz, using data from the Social Security Administration, describes the downfall of the name Heather. It exhibited the sharpest decline of all names since 1880. Talking to Laura Wattenberg: Wattenberg says the rise and fall of Heather is exemplary of the faddish nature of American names. “When fashion is ready for a name, even...

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Disney-Fox market share

Disney is set to buy 21st Century Fox for $52.4 billion. I honestly don’t have the mental capacity or imagination to comprehend such a large sum, much less figure out how such a deal works. At least Youyou Zhou, reporting for Quartz, provides breakdowns of market share for the two companies, which makes things a bit more understandable. If the deal goes through, Disney is going to be (an even...

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Iceberg scale, as described in different countries

A giant iceberg broke off from Antartica. Like, really big. Quartz collected the comparisons made in various countries to make the numbers more relatable to readers. As news traveled around the world that one of the largest icebergs ever observed had finally broken off from Antarctica, reporters were faced with a question of scale. Few among us can visualize just how large a 2,200 square-mile (5,698 square-kilometer) hunk of ice...

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Circle drawing as an indicator for culture

Thu-Huong Ha and Nikhil Sonnad for Quartz looked at the doodling dataset from Google, in search of cultural differences hidden in how we draw circles around the world. We used the public database from Quick, Draw! to compare how people draw basic shapes around the world. Our analysis suggests that the way you draw a simple circle is linked to geography and cultural upbringing, deep-rooted in hundreds of years of...

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