race

39 posts
Black neighborhoods split by highways

Rachael Dottle, Laura Bliss and Pablo Robles for Bloomberg on how urban highways often split communities: By the 1960s, the neighborhood’s business core was gone, replaced by newly constructed Interstate 94. Homes that had been a short walk to the shops now overlooked a six-lane highway shuttling commuters between the Twin Cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul. Homes and businesses were seized and destroyed under eminent domain. The neighborhood was...

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Black mortality gap

Anna Flagg, for NYT’s The Upshot, used dots arranged as a stacked area chart to show the difference between two mortality rates. Each dot represents 10 people, and they start as a random cloud. A transition to show rate by age lends focus to both an absolute and relative count. Tags: Anna Flagg, mortality, race, Upshot

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Race and ethnicity map of dots

CNN goes with the dot density map for their first pass on the 2020 decennial. Each dot represents a certain number of people depending on your zoom level. Color represents race or ethnicity. Does CNN have a limited color palette that they’re allowed to use? I would’ve gone for more contrast between the light blue for white and darker-but-still-light blue for American Indian/Alaskan Native. See also: Dustin Cable’s racial dot...

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Shift in white population vs. people of color

The New York Times go with the angled arrows to show the shifts in racial population. The red-orange arrows show an increase in the share of white population, and the teal arrows show an increase in the share of people of color. Longer arrows mean a greater percentage point change. Whereas The Washington Post focused more on the changes for each demographic individually, NYT focused more on how two broad...

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Maps of racial population change

Using their peaks and valleys metaphor, The Washington Post shows the shift in racial population between 2010 and 2020. The open triangles, one for each county, show population with width, population growth with height, and fastest-growing race or ethnicity with color. You might recognize the form from the Post’s 2016 election results, but there’s a small wrinkle when you look at the breakdowns for individual groups. The triangles flip upside...

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Collecting reports of anti-Asian hate crimes

The New York Times collected, categorized, and linked to reports of anti-Asian hate crimes over the past year. The levels of ignorance, cowardice, and stupidity is off the charts. Tags: Asian, hate crime, New York Times, race

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Excess deaths, by race

It’s clear that Covid-19 has affected groups differently across the United States. By geography. By education level. By income. The Marshall Project breaks down excess deaths by race: Earlier data on cases, hospitalizations and deaths revealed the especially heavy toll on Black, Hispanic and Native Americans, a disparity attributed to unequal access to health care and economic opportunities. But the increases in total deaths by race were not reported until...

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Gaps between mortality rates for black and white Americans

For NYT Opinion, Gus Wezerek charted the gaps between white and black mortality rate: If Black people had died at the same age-adjusted rate as white people in 2018, they would have avoided 65,000 premature, excess deaths — the equivalent of three coach buses filled with Black people crashing and killing them all every day of the year. …oof. The variable width bar chart above is one of several graphics...

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Race and the virus

The New York Times obtained data on race and those affected by the coronavirus. Not everyone has been affected equally: Early numbers had shown that Black and Latino people were being harmed by the virus at higher rates. But the new federal data — made available after The New York Times sued the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — reveals a clearer and more complete picture: Black and Latino...

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Gaps between black and white America

New York Times Opinion compared several demographics, such as unemployment and income, between majority-black and majority-white neighborhoods in the United States. They come back to the zipper chart technique where the dots start together and then separate to emphasize the gaps. Horizontally, dots are sorted by smallest to largest difference. Tags: demographics, New York Times, race

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