Reuters

83 posts
Anatomy of an outbreak

For Reuters, Manas Sharma and Simon Scarr animated a coronavirus outbreak in Singapore between January and April, going with the force-directed bubble view. It starts small, then there’s the spread, and clusters form. Tags: coronavirus, outbreak, Reuters, Singapore

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Moves towards reopening the country

Using anonymized cellphone data from SafeGraph, Reade Levinson and Chris Canipe for Reuters mapped the change in foot traffic for different types of businesses over time. Orange represents more movements since the first week of March. Blue means less. Yellow means about the same. We’re working towards all orange. Fingers crossed. Sidenote: Now isn’t really the time, but when it is, we’re gonna have to come back to this mobile...

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Who should receive care first, an ethical dilemma

At greater disparities between low resources and high volumes of sick people, doctors must decide who lives and who dies, which seems a moral burden with a single case, much less anything more. So systems are setup to relieve some of that pressure. For Reuters, Feilding Cage uses clear illustrations to describe possible policies to help healthcare workers decide who receives care first. Tags: coronavirus, Feilding Cage, healthcare, policy, Reuters

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Sheltering in small places

For many, sheltering in place means sheltering in relatively small places. Reuters zoomed in on the tight quarters in Tokyo, Japan. Not much room for movement. Tags: coronavirus, Reuters, shelter-in-place, Tokyo

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Slowing down the rate of deaths, aka breaking the wave

For Reuters, Jon McClure looks at the death counts for each country from a different angle. “Each line measures how much the number of fatalities grew in seven days.” The goal is to “break the wave” to get the rates down. The charts are a combination of flattening the curve and the daily updated charts from The Financial Times showing death tolls. I have a feeling the geometry will confuse...

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Social distancing isn’t available for everyone

For Reuters, Chris Canipe looks at social distancing from the perspective of household income: Anonymized smartphone data in the United States shows some interesting trends. People in larger cities and urban corridors were more likely to change their travel habits, especially in early March. By the end of the month, most U.S. residents were traveling dramatically less than they did in February, but social and demographic differences were strong predictors...

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Scale of Australia bushfires shown with unit charts

Outside of Australia, it can be a challenge to get a grasp of how bad the bushfires actually are. There have been some attempts that overlay a map of Australia over various locations, but they’ve varied in accuracy. This scrolling unit chart by Reuters Graphics makes the comparison more concrete. Each square represents a square kilometer, a counter at the top ticks up as you scroll, and geographic points of...

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Using old ship logs as a window into the weather in the 1800s

For Reuters, Feilding Cage describes a weather time machine project by NOAA that uses old shipping logs to build climate models for the 19th century: In the 19th and early 20th centuries, millions of weather observations were carefully made in the logbooks of ships sailing through largely uncharted waters. Written in pen and ink, the logs recorded barometric pressure, air temperature, ice conditions and other variables. Today, volunteers from a...

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Plastic bottles purchased in a day, Eiffel Tower for scale

Millions of plastic bottles are purchased every day around the world. What does that look like? Simon Scarr and Marco Hernandez for Reuters virtually piled the estimated number of bottles purchased in an hour, day, month, and up to the past 10 years. They used the Eiffel Tower for scale. The above is just one day’s worth. Tags: plastic, Reuters, scale

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Cost of a Census undercount

The citizenship question for the upcoming Census is still stuck in limbo. One of the arguments against the question is that it could lead to a significant undercount in population, which can lead to less funding. For Reuters, Ally J. Levine and Ashlyn Still show how this might happen with a highlight on federal programs that rely on population estimates. Tags: census, Reuters, undercount

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