satellite imagery

1 posts
Wildfires and floods, a geographic before and after

In 2021, a large portion of North America was stuck in a heat dome with record temperatures and wildfires. Gordon Logie for Sparkgeo mapped the before-and-after of major wildfires during the year in British Columbia, with a combination of satellite imagery, photos, and scrolling. Logie then shows major floods, which are not necessarily caused by the fires, but are highly correlated. The transitions for the before-and-after show the wildfire damage...

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Scale of Ukrainian cities

When you look inside the cities around the world, you will often find familiarity to where you live. For The Washington Post, Bonnie Berkowitz, Dylan Moriarty and Hannah Dormido look for the familiarity in the attacked cities in Ukraine. With side-by-side comparisons to U.S. cities, Ukraine feels less distant. See also Scale-a-Tron, which lets you compare the scale of anywhere in the world against anywhere else in the world. Tags:...

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Scale of the Tonga eruption

Manas Sharma and Simon Scarr used satellite imagery to show the scale of the Tonga eruption, which spurted a 24-mile cloud that grew to 400 miles in diameter in an hour. Notice the little Manhattan in the bottom left corner in the image above. However, instead of leaving it at that, Sharma and Scarr animated the eruption over familiar geographic areas to better see how big it was. The cloud...

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Sand mining viewed from above

Poyang Lake is China’s largest freshwater lake, but sand mining has changed its depth and structure, which messes up the ecosystem. Simon Scarr and Manas Sharma for Reuters used satellite imagery to show the scale and disruption of the mining activities. The ships look like little bugs slowly eating away at the coastline. Tags: mining, Poyang Lake, Reuters, satellite imagery

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Average color of geographic areas

Based on satellite imagery, Erin Davis found the average color of places around the world. The above is by county in the United States, but Davis also made maps by country, which are a mix of greens, browns, and yellows. See also the NYT piece from 2020, which framed color by political leaning. Tags: color, Erin Davis, R, satellite imagery

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Satellite imagery at a cute angle

Maybe you remember the SimCity-like views through satellite imagery from a few of years ago. Robert Simmon from Planet Labs returns to the topic discussing practical use cases and advantages over a top-down view: Satellite imagery surrounds us — from Google Maps and daily weather forecasts to the graphics illustrating news stories — but almost all of it is from a map-like, top-down perspective. This view allows satellite data to...

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Red-blue electoral map and the green-gray in satellite imagery

For NYT’s The Upshot, Tim Wallace and Krishna Karra looked at how the red-blue electoral map relates to the green and gray color spectrum in satellite imagery: The pattern we observe here is consistent with the urban-rural divide we’re accustomed to seeing on traditional maps of election results. What spans the divide — the suburbs represented by transition colors — can be crucial to winning elections. It’s part of why...

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DIY satellite ground station to receive images from NOAA

You can basically hook up an antennae to your laptop and start receiving images from space. This DIY guide from Public Lab amazes me. The NOAA satellites have inbuilt radio antennas that transmit the data collected by the AVHRR instrument on a frequency in the 137 MHz range. To minimise interference between satellites, each NOAA satellite transmits on a different frequency within the 137 MHz range. […] Your antenna is...

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Urban growth via satellite imagery

For The Upshot, Emily Badger and Quoctrung Bui looked for major urban developments in the United States by comparing satellite imagery of past to present: To grasp the scale of this decade of change, The Upshot worked with Tim Wallace and Krishna Karra from Descartes Labs, a geospatial analytics company, using a tool that has itself evolved significantly over this time: satellite imagery. With its growing power and precision, we...

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High-resolution satellite image of Kincade fire, up close from far away

I feel like satellite imagery has upped its skillset in recent years. According to Rob Simmon, the image below from Planet of the Kincade fire in Sonoma, California was taken from 600 miles away in Utah. Planet SkySat imagery of the #KincadeFire captured at an extreme angle yesterday, October 27th. pic.twitter.com/WQd7RKsM81 — Planet (@planetlabs) October 28, 2019 Tags: Planet, satellite imagery, wildfire

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