scale

396 posts
Scale of the Tonga eruption

Manas Sharma and Simon Scarr used satellite imagery to show the scale of the Tonga eruption, which spurted a 24-mile cloud that grew to 400 miles in diameter in an hour. Notice the little Manhattan in the bottom left corner in the image above. However, instead of leaving it at that, Sharma and Scarr animated the eruption over familiar geographic areas to better see how big it was. The cloud...

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Best chart I have seen this year

Marvelling at this chart:   *** The credit ultimately goes to a Reddit user (account deleted). I first saw it in this nice piece of data journalism by my friends at System 2 (link). They linked to Visual Capitalism (link). There are so many things on this one chart that makes me smile. The animation. The message of the story is aging population. Average age is moving up. This uptrend...

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Think twice before you spiral

After Nathan at FlowingData sang praises of the following chart, a debate ensued on Twitter as others dislike it. The chart was printed in an opinion column in the New York Times (link). I have found few uses for spiral charts, and this example has not changed my mind. The canonical time-series chart is like this:   *** The area chart takes no effort to understand. We can see when...

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Scale of the bigger, more detailed universe

We’ve learned more about the universe since Charles and Ray Eames produced Powers of Ten in 1977, so the BBC made an homage to the film, updating with what we know now. Spoiler alert: the universe is still big. Tags: BBC, scale, space

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Powers of Ten

The Powers of Ten by Charles and Ray Eames from 1977 shows the size of the universe by starting at human scale and then zooming out further and further. Then it comes back down to Earth and zooms in closer and closer. I’ve linked to this iconic film a few times but just wanted to put up an actual post here for reference. You should definitely check it out if...

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Scale of black holes

I’m not sure there’s any way to really understand the scale of the largest black holes in the universe, but Kurzgesagt gives it a good try. Tags: black hole, Kurzgesagt, scale, space

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To explain or to eliminate, that is the question

Today, I take a look at another project from Ray Vella's class at NYU. (The above image is a honeypot for "smart" algorithms that don't know how to handle image dimensions which don't fit their shadow "requirement". Human beings should proceed to the full image below.) As explained in this post, the students visualized data about regional average incomes in a selection of countries. It turns out that remarkable differences...

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Displaying convoluted indices

I reviewed another batch of projects from Ray Vella's class at NYU. The following piece by Carlos Lasso made an impression on me. There are no pyrotechnics but he made one decision that added a lot of clarity to the graphic. The underlying dataset gauges the income disparity of regions within nine countries. The richest and the poorest regions are selected for each country. Two time points are shown. Altogether, there...

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Scale of ocean depths

We know the oceans are deep, but it’s difficult to grasp the scale of just how deep, because, well, it’s underwater. MetaBallStudios, a YouTube channel that focuses on perspective and 3-D animation, guides you through the depths of major bodies of water. You’ll pass notable on-land monuments along the way. [via kottke] Tags: 3-d, depth, MetaBallStudios, ocean, scale

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Commuting calculator

Sergio Peçanha and Yan Wu for The Washington Post made a calculator that shows how much time you spend commuting in a year and what you could do with that time instead. The input, interaction, and calculations are straightforward. Just use the slider to specify your roundtrip commute time, and the numbers update. The easiest thing to do would be to just provide the total hours. You commute for an...

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