Science

1 posts
Evolution of the periodic table of elements

As more elements were discovered, the table grew and changed layout. For Science Magazine, Jake Yeston, Nirja Desai, and Elbert Wang provide a visual history. Tags: elements, Periodic Table, science

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Two views of earthquake occurrence in the Bay Area

This article has a nice description of earthquake occurrence in the San Francisco Bay Area. A few quantities are of interest: when the next quake occurs, the size of the quake, the epicenter of the quake, etc. The data graphic included in the article fails the self-sufficiency test: the only way to read this chart is to read out the entire data set - in other words, the graphical details...

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Environmental science can use better graphics

Mike A. pointed me to two animated maps made by Caltech researchers published in LiveScience (here). The first map animation shows the rise and fall of water levels in a part of California over time. It's an impressive feat of stitching together satellite images. Click here to play the video. The animation grabs your attention. I'm not convinced by the right side of the color scale in which the white...

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Graphical advice for conference presenters – demo

Yesterday, I pulled this graphic from a journal paper, and said one should not copy and paste this into an oral presentation. So I went ahead and did some cosmetic surgery on this chart. I don't know anything about the underlying science. I'm just interpreting what I see on the chart. It seems like the key message is that the Flowering condition is different from the other three. There are...

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Graphical advice for conference presenters

I've attended a number of talks in the last couple of days at the Joint Statistical Meetings. I'd like to offer some advice to presenters using graphics in their presentations. Here is an example of the style of graphics that are being presented. (Note: I deliberately picked an example from a Google image search - this graphic was not used in a presentation but is representative of those I've seen.)...

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Some Tufte basics brought to you by your favorite birds

Someone sent me this via Twitter, found on the Data is Beautiful reddit: The chart does not deliver on its promise: It's tough to know which birds like which seeds. The original chart was also provided in the reddit: I can see why someone would want to remake this visualization. Let's just apply some Tufte fixes to it, and see what happens. Our starting point is this: First, consider the...

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Please help the Delaware Dept of Education

Shane C. asked me to fill out a survey hosted by the Delaware Department of Education. This is a survey about designing their dashboard. And I'm very happy to see that they are doing this. In the survey, you are asked to comment on different ways of presenting certain data, and they want to know which version is "easier to understand". It takes about 5-10 minutes to complete it. The...

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Storm story, a masterpiece

The visual story published by the New York Times on hurricane Irma is a masterpiece. See the presentation here. The story starts with the standard presentation of the trajectories of past hurricane on a map: Maps are great at conveying location and direction but much is lost in this rendering - wind speeds, time, strength, energy, to name but a few. The Times then switches to other chart forms to...

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A pretty good chart ruined by some naive analysis

The following chart showing wage gaps by gender among U.S. physicians was sent to me via Twitter: The original chart was published by the Stat News website (link). I am most curious about the source of the data. It apparently came from a website called Doximity, which collects data from physicians. Here is a link to the PR release related to this compensation dataset. However, the data is not freely...

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Pints, water, fishes, pond

@apollo_0 on twitter asks me to comment on this, by Scientific Britain:   Here's my comment:  

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