scrollytelling

1 posts
Shifting currents and melting ice in the Antarctic

Based on data from autonomous sensors floating in the oceans, researchers are able to model the flows and characteristics of ocean currents in more detail than ever before. For The New York Times, Henry Fountain and Jeremy White show how the shifts have unwelled centuries-old water deep in the ocean, which releases carbon into the air. The scrollytelling format of this piece works well to show sensor estimates over time....

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Treemap tour of political donations

The Digital Story Innovation Team for ABC News in Australia looked at political donations from the gambling industry. The piece goes all-in with treemaps in a scrollytelling format to show categories and individual donations. It starts with an individual point and keeps zooming out more and more. Then when you think it’s done, it zooms out more. Tags: ABC News, contributions, politics, scrollytelling

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Collapse of Mexico City Metro explained

The New York Times investigated the collapse of the Metro, which killed 26 people. They explain their findings with a 3-D model of the train and the tracks: The Times took thousands of photographs of the crash site and shared the evidence with several leading engineers who reached the same conclusion: The steel studs that were vital to the strength of the overpass — linchpins of the entire structure —...

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An atlas for the world’s development indicators

The World Bank tracks global development through a number of indicators. (You can see and download much of the data through their catalog.) With a story-based approach, they published an atlas for 2020 that focuses on 17 development goals, such as end poverty, end hunger, and stop global warming. There’s one story per goal, charting out multiple indicators in each story. There’s a lot to look at, but one thing...

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Red counties mostly stayed red

For The New York Times, Denise Lu and Karen Yourish looked at the red and blue shifts for the counties that voted red in 2016: President-elect Joseph R. Biden Jr. won the popular vote by more than five million — and his margin is expected to grow as states finish counting. Still, results so far show that President Trump’s support remained strong in most of the counties that voted for...

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Maps of Home

Dots on a map can feel like, well, just a bunch of dots. Dylan Moriarty zoomed in on the dot of his hometown, making the dot feel more real: The map concept at the top of this piece has been kicking in my head for a long while. Came from a dream: Meandering in a museum space, from far, far away you see a map introducing a new exhibit on...

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Fires in the west and climate change

This is some advanced mapping and scrollytelling from the Washington Post. The piece examines climate change in the context of the fires in the western United States. Starting in the beginning of August, the piece takes you through the timeline of events as your scroll. Maps of temperature, wind, lightning, and fire serve as the backdrop. Berry Creek, California, a mountain town that burned to the ground, provides an anchor...

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If the unemployed lose $600 per week

A $600 per week benefit expires for the unemployed at the end of July. Congress is still deciding what to do after. For The New York Times, Ella Koeze highlights the percentage of usual income the unemployed will receive as a function of annual earnings and weekly benefit amount if the benefit goes away. Each dot represents a state. The percentage ranges in the background provide a point of reference...

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Comparing U.S. coronavirus case rates to other hot spots

The numbers are high here in the United States, and at this point, they look bad on their own. But compare it to other countries that are currently hit hard, the U.S. looks even worse. For The New York Times, Lauren Leatherby makes the comparisons. Tags: coronavirus, Lauren Letherby, New York Times, scale, scrollytelling

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How an earthquake can trigger others on the opposite side of the world

Speaking of earthquakes, Will Chase looked back at a 2012 earthquake in Sumatra that triggered not only a bunch of small ones in the vicinity, but other large ones around the world: In the ten days following the Sumatra mainshock, 44 earthquakes M5.5+ were recorded. The statistics were clear: this nine-fold increase was highly significant, and most researchers agreed the likely explanation was remote triggering by the M8.6 Sumatra earthquake....

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